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Full text of "La Vie Collegienne: Lebanon Valley College Student Newspaper (Fall 1930)"

LA VIE 
WELCOMES NEW 
STUDENTS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



HATS OFF 
TO THE FROSH 
SCRAPPERS 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1930. 



No. 1 



FRESHMEN WEEK 
IS SUCCESSFUL 



TESTS, LECTURES AND 
SOCIAL EVENTS 
PROVIDED 



For the second consecutive year, 
Lebanon Valley provided a special 
four-days' program for the Freshmen 
prior to the official opening of the 
semester. 

Orientation Tests, Lectures and 
Social Events were provided during 
this period for the Freshmen so as 
to enable them to begin their work 
in a successful manner. It served 
the double purpose of providing an 
opportunity for the faculty to get 
acquainted academically with the 
members of the class of 1934 and 
also for them to get acquainted with 
one another and familiarize them- 
selves with the college buildings. The 
pining Hall and Dormitories were 
open to the members of the entering 
class on Wednesday, September 17. 
at 9:00 A. M. 

Attendance was required of all 
who entered as Freshmen. The num- 
erous social events were espcially en- 
joyed, and doubtless went far towards 
dispelling the pangs of home-sickness 
which are always so keely felt by 
new students. So successful was 
this year's program that the practice 
will unquestionably be continued in 
the future. 

The full program appears below. 
Wednesday, September 17 

A. M. 9:00-12:00— Registration 
(names A-L inc.) 
P. M. 1:00-4:00 — Registration (names 
M-Z inc.) 

6:00 P. M.— Banquet in Honor of 
New Students— Dining Hall. The 
President, Faculty and Wives pre- 
siding. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 

8:30-9:30— Chapel Service, College 
Chappel. Address of Welcome by 
President G. D. Gossard. Announce- 
ments. 

9:00-12:00— General Science Tests 
—Chapel. 

10:00-12:00— Psychological Test- 
Chapel. 

2:30-3:00 P. M.— Talk by the Li- 
arian on How to Use the Library. 
—Chapel. 
3:00-4:00— English Test— Chapel 
5:30 P. M.— Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
w A. Hike and Camp Fire. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 
7:458:00 A. M. — Chapel Service— 
Chapel. 

8:00-10:00 A. M.— Mathematical 
fes t Chapel. 

11:00-12:00 A. M.— Section 1 in 
library Science— Library. 

2:00-4:00 P. M. — Civics and Gov- 
ei *ment Test— Chapel. 

44:00-5:00 P. M. Section 2 in Li- 
rar V Science — Library. 

6:30-8:00 P. M.— Faculty and Lit- 
rar y Societies at Home to Students 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 
ra 8; 00-9:00 A. M. — Section 3 in Lib- 

f y Science — Library. 

9: °0-11:00 A. M.— Foreign Lan- 
|N?e Test-Chapel. 
^1:00-12:00 A. M.— Section 4 in Li- 

*" y Science — Library. 
c P. M. — Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
J ' A - Reception to New Students— 

Um ni Gymnasium. 



br 



SOCIETIES PRESENT 

A JOINT PROGRAM 



For the benefit of the new student*, 
the four literary societies presentea 
a joint program on Friday night, 
Sept. 26 at 8:00 o'clock m the Engle 
Conservatory. Each society prepared 
its own section of the program. They 
entertained in the following order: 
Clio first, Philo second, Delphian 
third and Kalo fourth. 

"Just Like In A Story Book" was 
the theme of Clio's part in the pro- 
gram. Eulalie Morton, representing 
Mother Goose, in a short prolouge 
prepared the audience for the follow- 
ing scene which showed the dream 
of a little girl who had fallen asleep 
while reading a story book. Seated 
around the child on the stage were 
the numerous story book characters, 
such as Little Boy Blue, Old King 
Cole, Little Bo Peep, Jack Horner, 
etc. Out of the page of a huge story 
book stepped Jack and Jill (Mary 
Rupp and "Charlie" Mummert) whose 
acrobatics surely surpassed the 
tumbling acts of the real Jack and 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FROSH TRIUMPH 
IN CLASS SCRAP 

FIRST FROSH VICTORY 
IN MANY 
YEARS 



For the first time in many years 
the Freshman came out victorious 
in the annual Soph-Frosh class scrap 
last evening on the ground behind 
the men's dormitory after one hour 
and thirty six minutes of hard strug- 
gling. 

The fight was of the same type 
carried out the last two years. A 
banner of each class having been 
placed on a pole, it was the object of 
both sides to tear down the oppon- 
ent's standard and carriy it outside 
of the fighting ring. 

The Men's Senate had charge of the 
affair and refereed the melee. The 
rules were simple consisting of a ban 
on slugging. 

The actual fighting time was one 
hour and twelve minutes. Nearly all 
of this time was spent in trying to 
get a man up the pole clear of the 
mob below. When this was found to 
be futile the flags were lowered a 
few feet and within four minutes 
Bezell, a Freshmen ninty-eight pound 
man, was hoisted up and tore down 
the greater part of the flag. The 
victory was awarded to the Fresh- 
man class. 

Previously Clements had snatched 
a small piece off the corner but was 
not enough to get a good portion. 
Clements, Bezzell and Green, a soph, 
were all making good attempts at 
the end of the fight. Shrom, Hoover, 
Werner, and Shrope were towers of 
defense around the pole and were 
powerful in boosting the lighter men 
up. 

The fight became furious as it pro- 
gressed and was perhaps the rough- 
est one for some years. Lehman came 
out with a sprained wrist and Em- 

( Continued on Page 3) 



VILLANOVA TAKES 
OPENING GAME 

LOCAL SQUAD SHOWS 
GOOD MATERIAL 
FOR FUTURE 



Although Lebanon Valley was un- 
successful in her opening encounter 
with Viilanova on Saturday, tne team 
put up a hard fight. For a while it 
looked as if a hard battle was in 
store for L. V.'s opponents but after 
the first quarter Vilianova broke 
loose and won by the score of 19-0. 

Many weaknesses showed up on the 
defense and the offense was not ef- 
fective at any time. Three first 
downs was the entire extent of Leb- 
anon Valley's gaining. 

On the other hand Villanova's line 
opened up large holes for their back- 
field men. Highiield and Geisler did 
most of the ground gaining. Tne 
latter reeled off successive runs ot 
20, 24, 14, and 12 yards for the final 
touchdown. 

Lebanon Valley's passing attack 
was broken up by "Viilanova. Only 
one pass out of six was completed 
for a gain of about thirteen yards. 

Botli teams made many substiiu- 
tions in the second half. Six fresh- 
men saw action for Lebanon Valley 
and most of them showed up well. 
They held Vilianova in the last quar- 
ter bracing whenever a touchdown 
was threatened. 

The Lineup 
Lebonon Valley Pos. Vilianova 
Thrush L. E. McGann 

Bartolet L. T. Sheehan 

Wood L. G. Dietz 

Murphy C. Donovan 

Lechthaler R. G. Kobilis 
Kelly R. T. Bucker 

Heller R. E. Delabrida 

Patrizio Q. B. Morgan 

Daub R. H. B. Highfield 

Reeder L. H. B. Geisler 

S. Light F. B. Gardner 

Lebanon Valley 0—0 
Vilianova 13 6 0—19 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TREES ON CAMPUS 

HAVE BEEN LABELED 



No doubt all the students have 
seen the labels on the trees of the 
campus. They were put on for the 
edification of the student body under 
the supervision of Professor Derick- 
son and Professor Light of the Biol- 
ogy department. These signs how- 
ever are only the beginning of a pro- 
gram which will result in the label- 
ing of the trees and shrubbery on the 
campus. 

The signs are made of a metal 
that will not corrode or be in any 
way affected by the weather. The 
printing upon them include the com- 
mon name of the tree, the scientific 
name, the family to which it belongs 
and the region where it originated. 

As these signs lend considerable 
interest to the campus and also as 
they are very informative it is hoped 
that the student body will have some 
consideration for their preservation. 



W. S. G. A. MEETS TO 

ELECT NEW PRESIDENT 



The failure of Miss Madeline Shod- 
dy to return to L. V. C. this year 
made necessary a special meeting of 
the W. S. G. A. on Monday after- 
noon, September 22, at North Hall. 
The board met to select a new sen- 
ior member to take Miss Sheddy's 
place, and also to select a President. 

The place of Miss Sheddy as a 
Senior member of the board was 
filed by the election of Miss Mary 
Stager. An election was then held 
to fill the office of President left 
vacent by Miss Sheddy. This honor 
was confered upon Miss Caroline 
Fisher who immediately assumed the 
duties of her office. Miss Fisher's 
popularity promises her a success- 
ful regime as director of the women's 
'activities on the campus. 



NEW ENROLLMENT 
RECORD IS SET 

137 NEW STUDENTS SIGN 
FOR FIRST 
SEMESTER 



The registrar's office announced 
that all previous records have been 
broken by the enrollment, for the 
first semester of the 1930-31 term 
of new students. One hundred and 
twenty-six of the total 137 new ma- 
triculations are for Freshman work. 
The remainder will enter the three up- 
per classes. An exceptionally large 
number of applications had to be re- 
■ jected this year because of a lack 
of lodging accomadations. 

Of the various departments in the 
college, that of Business Administra- 
tion appears to have made the great- 
est gains, although it is the youngest 
of all the departments. 

The names of the newly enrolled 
students with their places of resi- 
dence and their class standing is as 
follows: 

FRESHMEN 

William Thad Abrams, Sunbury, 
Pa.; Marvin Lowell Adams, Adams^ 
dale, Pa.; James Orville Bemesder- 
fer, Lebanon, Pa.; Haidee Belle Blu- 
baugh, Myersville, Md.; Mildred Mab- 
el Bomberger, Lebanon, Pa.; Matilda 
Rose Bonanni, Myerstown, Pa.; Mir- 
iam Anna Book, Cleona, Pa.; Abram 
Landis Bower, Jr., Souderton, Pa.;; 
Mary Margaret Brace, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Emily Laura Brandt, Palmyra, Pa.; 
William Brown, Lebanon, Pa.; Geo. 
Yost Brubaker, Singing Springs, Pa.; 
Allen Eugene Buzzell, Sparrow's 
Point, Mid.; Rothermel Leon Caplan, 
Lebanon, Pa.; Paul Elias Deiber, 
Hummelstown, Pa.; George Valler- 
champ Derickson, Annville, Pa.; Wil- 
ber Koch Detwiler, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Gladys Viola Donmoyer, Lebanon, 
Pa.; Margaret Jean Dotter, Annville, 
Pa.; John Jacob Elser, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Dorothy Elizabeth Ely, Arendtsville., 
Pa.; Kathryn Marie Ely, Cranbury 
Station, N. J.; Cyrus Daniel Engle, 
Hummelstown, Pa.; De Witt Miller 
Essick, Downingtown, Pa.; Elvin 
Belden Fake, Lykins, Pa.; Emma 
Kathryn Fasnacht, Annville, Pa.; 
George Johnson Feary, Lebanon, Pa.; 
(Continued on Page 2) 



STUDENTS HEAR 
DR. KLONOWER 



INSPIRING MESSAGE 
OPENS FALL 
TERM 



The main feature of the Exercises 
Avhich officially opened the first 
semester of the 1930-31 scholastic 
year proved to be a very interesting 
address by Dr. Henry Klonower, head 
of the teacher's Bureau of the Penn- 
sylvania State Department of Public 
Instruction. In a very able and force- 
ful manner, Dr. Klonower pointed 
out to the students and others who 
crowded Engle Hall at 10:00, Mon- 
day Sept. 22, the advantages of a 
small institution. He called atten- 
tion to the increasingly aggressive 
attitude of the modern youth toward 
the problems of the day, and urged 
the students of L. V. C. to fall in 
line with this attitude. His talk was 
well spiced with humorous anecdotes, 
and was thoroughly appreciated by 
all. 

The remainder of the program was 
well carried out. Especially worthy 
of commendation were the splendid 
^endepings of the various musical 
features of the program, all of 
which were given by members of the 
faculty of the Conservatory of mus- 
ic. The entire program was carried 
out in a manner worthy of the rep- 
utation of Lebanon Valley College. 

A complete copy of the program 
follows: 

Doxology Audience 

Invocation Pres. Gossard 

Piece Heroique Franck 

R. Porter Campbell 
Scripture and Prayer Dr. J. O. Jones 

Berceuse from Jocelyn Godard 

Mazurka Wieniawski 

Harold Malsh 
Ballade in G. Minor Chopin 

Ruth Engle Bender 

Address Dr. HenryKlonower 

Hills of Home Fox 

Tommy Lad Morgeston 

Alexander Crawford 
Postlude R. Porter Campbell 



CLIOS ENTERTAINED 

BY THE MISSES SHENK 



On Thursday afternoon, September 
23, the Misses Lucile and Estella 
Shenk, alumnae of Lebanon Valley 
College, entertained at a tea in their 
home on Main Street, Annville, Pa, 
the members of the Clionian Liter- 
ary Society. The large number of 
girls who attended the tea returned 
with praises not only of the hospi- 
tality of their hostesses, but also of 
their fine spirit and interest in the 
society of which they were formerly 
members. 



Miss Yvonne Green '25 accompan- 
ied by her mother Mrs. Green, Dean 
of Women at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, and her aunt Miss Minnie Kapp 
went to France in August. Mrs. 
Green and Miss Kapp have returned 
but Miss Green has remained for a 
longer period. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Edito 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R .Morgan, '31 .... Managing Editor 

KEPORTOEIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31 

Madeline Sheddy, '31 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Hilda Buckley, '32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33 

General Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 .... Business Manager 
P. Keene, '32 Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 .... Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 

DA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



GREETINGS 



To its many new friends on the 
campus the LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 
extends its heartiest wishes for a 
profitable sojourn at Lebanon Valley 
College. We feel proud to witness 
an increase in the number who turii 
their faces toward our campus each 
year in search of educational advan- 
tages. Doubly proud are we to ob- 
serve that this increase is sustained 
in spite of a consistent raising of en- 
trance requirements. 

We would bid our new acquaint- 
ances rember, however, that they en- 
ter an institution whose honor we 
guard most jealously. We have tried 
our level best .to leave untarnished 
the record of the Blue and White; 
we will not permit our work to be 
undone without a struggle. Our aims 
are high, our hopes are lofty. Theirs 
it is to cooperate with us that these 
aims and hopes may be realized. We 
do not expect them to fully catch the 
spirit of our beloved campus at 
once. We simply ask that, as the 
days pass, and the life of our Alma 
Mater unfolds before them, they lend 
their support wholeheartedly to 
every activity that has as its objec- 
tive the exaltation of the name of 
Lebanon Valley College. 

The classroom, the dormitory, the 
grid-iron — each must contribute to- 
ward this end. It is not sufficient 
that we excell in one department. We 
must attain an excellence that is 
well-rounded and complete. Untried,, 
as the majority of the newcomers 
are, this particualr field in which 
greatest excellence is attainable in- 
dividually is as yet unknown, but this 
is highly ivelent. Of primary im- 
portance is that each shall do his 
best wherever he is engaged. 

There are doubtless many "rough- 
spots" which need to be removed be- 
moved before the newcomers can be 
considered full-fledged citizens. This 
applies especially to the "frosh". But 
no matter how hard the diamond may 
be, it can be polished, and regardless 
of how "green" the "frosh" may ap- 
pear, if properly taken in hand he 
can be thoroughly "ripened", figura- 
tively speaking. The agencies for 
the carrying out of this process al- 



ready exist. All that remains is for 
the "frosh" to be as clay in the hands 
of the potter. 

A painful process, this polishing? 
Well, perhaps. And yet, on the 
whole a highly profitable one. The 
adolescent youth who enters the typi- 
cal college of the day can usually 
afford to lose a considerable amount 
of self-complacency, otherwise 
known as "cockiness", before he be- 
comes a throughly civilized social 
animal. In fact we rather suspect 
that we ourselves have lost a consid- 
erable amount of the quality in ques- 
tion since the day we signed our reg- 
istration blanks. 

So there you are, new students. We 
are ready to do our utmost to help 
you. Will you accept the challenge? 



GROWING 



To be a member oi a progressive 
organization naj aiways oeen a 
source of pride to any person 01 in- 
telligence. rrogTesw, expansion 
growui — these aie Out synonyms 101 
the spine 01 the age. 

It bnoulu be quite evident by thio 
time tnac Leuanun Vaney ^oiiege it> 
determined to ao its snare 111 ioster- 
mg tnis spirit ox progress m tne ed- 
ucational neid. we t>ee evidence 01 
growtn ana improvement on every 
nand. A large and better qualified 
lacuity, more luiiy equippea buiiu- 
mgs, a constantly growing endow- 
ment, and a rapidiy increasing 
student body combine to piace be- 
yona question tne Administration's 
purpose to make L. V. C a progres- 
sive institution. 

We who have spent several years 
on the campus ot our Alma Matei 
cannot but view these evidences ot 
growth with a keen sense of satis- 
faction and juscinable pivde. We 
have somehow learned to love hei 
ivy-clad wails, imbued as they are 
with a wealth of tradition, and sur- 
rounded by many endearing asso- 
ciations with the past. To see her 
strike her colors now would make 
us hang our heads in shame. But 
of this we need have no fear. Sht 
is growing and from ail indications, 
will continue to do so. ' 

And yet we are reminded thae the 
greatest endowement which can be 
bestowed upon any school is a bod> 
of earnest and industrious students. 
Better equipement means little if it 
does not find expression in finer char- 
acter more effectively put to use in 
the service of humanity. Buildings 
and endowement funds are material 
things and as such are doomed to 
perish eventually. But character ana 
service are things of the spirit; they 
alone will abide. 

Our pride in bslonging to a grow- 
ing institution should therefore be- 
come an active one. We want L. V. 
C. to keep on growing. Are we will- 
ing to do our share in the classroom 
and elsewhare on the campus to con- 
tinue her progress? Let's think it 
over. 



APPRECIATION 



The returning students of former 
years have doubtless been favorably 
impressed by the many improvements 
in the equipment of the school which 
have been effected during the sum- 
mer. The administration is to be com- 
mended for the splendid work it has 
done in this connection. 

How deeply we apreciate these 
changes remain to be seen, however, 
In the past few years, several indi- 
viduals have come to L. V. C. and 
left their respect for property at 
home, apparently. We do not know 
whether or not one or two of this 
type of individual are to be found 
this year; we are shooting at ran- 
dom. But if any such turn up, we 
appeal to those of the student body 
who still retain a gentlemantly res- 



pect for the rights of others to do 
their duty and "sit upon" such per- 
sons, and "sit upon" them good and 
hard. That, we feel, is a mighty fine 
way of showing our appreciation, a 
way that is practical, at least, if noth- 
ing more. 



NEW ENROLLMENT 

RECORD IS SET 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Grant Quincey Feeser, Lebanon, Pa,; 
William Kemper Fishburn, Ephrata, 
Pa,; George Battdorf Flowers, Leb- 
anon, Pa.; James Jacob Fridy, Mount- 
ville, Pa.; Gem Caroly Gemmell, Glen 
Rock, Pa.; Mary Elizabeth Gossard, 
Annville, Pa.; Aubrey Goss Gaudie, 
Lebanon, Pa.; Harold Robert Green, 
Linden, N. J.; Richard Baker Green, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Verna Irene Gris- 
singer, New Cumberland, Pa.; Mary 
Spotten Groff, Columbia, Pa.; Daniel 
Dwight Grove, Felton, Pa.; Christine 
Gingrich Gruber, Lawn, Pa.; Robert 
Clinger Heath, Reading, Pa.; Cath- 
erine Fietta Heckman, Reading, Pa.; 
Henrietta Erb Heilman, Annville, 
Pa.; Hilda Thelma Heller, Harris- 
burg, Pa.; Melvin Clair Hitz, Harris- 
burg, Pa.; Earl Edward Hoover, 
Somerset, Pa.; Eart Sylvester How- 
ard, Broguivilie, Pa.; George Samuel 
Howes, De Witt, Iowa; Robert Sher- 
bine Hughes, Portage, Pa.; Dorothy 
Mary Jackson, Esterly, Pa.; Peter 
Handrat, Minersville, Pa.; George 
Martin Klitch, Harrisburg, Pa.; Mar- 
garet Elizabeth Kohler, Smithbury, 
Md.; Cyrus Bomberger Krall, Leba- 
non, Pa.; Anna Moran Krebs, Pal- 
myra, Pa.; Mark Kank Kreider, 
Cleona, Pa. Martha Ulrich Kreider, 
Media, Pa.; Evelyr Mabel Lampart, 
Trenton, N. J.; Helen Ruth Lane, 
Lodi, N. J.; Fred Deibler Lehman, 
Harisburg, Pa.; Homer Albert Light, 
Lebanon, Pa.; Kathryn Sara Light, 
Lebanon, Pa.; Max Henry Light, 
Lebanon, Pa.; Carl Phillips Long, 
Enola, Pa.; Annie Margaret Long- 
enecker, Middletown, Pa.; Floyd Ed- 
ward Mantz, Orwigsburg, Pa.; Floyd 
Pencratus March, Scotland, Pa.; Ruth 
Anna Mark, Hagerstown, Pa.; Gil- 
bert Thomas Marion, Hummelstown, 
Pa.; Galen Richard Martin, Annville, 
Pa.; Wilbur H. Mathias, New Cum- 
berland, Pa.; Anna Elizabeth Matula, 
Middletown, Pa.; Harry Algire 
McFaul, Baltimore, Md.; Clyde Sna- 
der Mentzer, Ephrata, Pa.; Charles 
Jacquith Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Harvey Joseph Miller, Lickdale, Pa. 
LeRoy Charles Miller, Tremont, Pa. 
Marian Grace Millerde Annville, Pa. 
Marjorie Alice Miller, Lemoyne, Pa. 
Rudolph Bradford Miller, Elizabeth, 
N. J.; Walter William Miller, Leb- 
anon, Pa.; Winifred Howard Miller, 
Elizabeth, N. J. Kathryn Maude 
Mowrey, Harrisburg, Pa.; Mildred 
Almeda Nye, Annville, Pa.; Gertrude 
Catherine Paul, Middletown, Pa.; 
Clarence Harrison Pike, Rutherford 
Heights, Pa.; Arnold Pano Pipilen, 
Farmingdale, N. Y.; Bernice Cynthia 
Raimon, Elizabeth, N. J.; John Allen 
Ranck, New Holland, Pa.; Lester 
Herbert Reed, Lebanon, Pa.; Arthur 
Sheridan Reeder, De Witt, Iowa; Jo- 
seph Sherman Rice, Annville, Pa.; 
Italo Louis Rossini, Cornwall, Pa.; 
Evangeline Bettle Saloris, Lancas- 
ter, Pa.; Elizabeth Louise Shaak, 
Lebanon, Pa. Edgar Bender Sehan- 
backer, Lebanon, Pa.; Richard Donald 
Schreiber, Lebanon, Pa.; Andrew 
Schwartz, Jr. Ephrata, Pa.; James; 
Heber Scott, Lebanon, Pa.; William 
Carl Shaffer. Johnstown, Pa.; Walter 
Russell Seeger, New York City, N. 
Y.; George David Sherk, Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Eva Louise Shissler, Lititz, Pa.; 
Thelma Irene Shoop, Tower City, 
Pa.jDonald Reigh, Harrisburg, Pa.; 
Luke Hornberger Shrom, Ephrata, 
Pa.; Francis Lee Mar Slack, Sun- 
bury, Pa.; Richard Sillik Slaybaugh, 
Biglersville, Pa.; Ester Lois Smes- 



ser, Camp Hill, Pa.; George Hanford 
Snowbill, Boonton, N. J.; William 
Edward Sparks, Linden, N. J.; Car- 
roll Sprenkle, York, Pa.; John Paul 
Todd, Jr. Flushing, N. Y.; Horaqe 
Trachtenberg, Coatsville, Pa.; John 
Wilson Trego, Ephrata, Pa.; Edmund 
ienry Umberger, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Leonard Volkin, Mount Pleasant, Pa.; 
Ada Charlotte Weirick, Enola, Pa.; 
Kenneth Samuel Whisler, Hanover, 
Pa.; George Carroll Wikoff, Trenton, 
N. J.; Edna Viola Williams, Lancas- 
ter, Pa.; Russell Lee Roy Williams, 
Winfield, Pa.; Kathryn Louise Wit- 
mer, Hummelstown, Pa.; Minna El- 
liott Wilfskeil, Elizabeth, N. J.; Rob- 
ert Daniel Womer, Lebanon, Pa.; 
John David Zech, Spring Grove, Pa. 
SOPHOMORES 
Leona Gray Allen, Clymer, Pa.; 
Herman Anthony Mariono, Hummels- 
town, Pa.; Dorothy Elizabeth Ely, 
Arendtsville, Pa.; Regina Mae Oyler, 
Arendtsville, Pa.; Miriam Irene 
Owen, Ormond, Florida. Virginia 
Gray Thrush, Shippensburg, Pa. 
JUNIORS 
Elwood Clarence Boyer, Bellaire, 
Pa.; Margaret Alice Lehn, Elizabeth- 
town, Pa. 

SENIORS 

Merle Weaver Eshleman, Hagers- 
town, Md.; Sadie Emma Light, 
Cleona, Pa.; Melvin Guy Sponsler, 
Halifax, Pa. 



Professor H. H. Shenk, '00, is pre- 
paring a History of the Lebanon Val- 
ley which will be published by the 
Harrisburg Telegraph Company 
about the first of November. It will 
include the area between Hummels- 
town and Sinking Springs all of 
which is rich in incidents connected 
with the early settlement of this sec- 
tion of Pennsylvania. His two 
daughters, Lucile, '23 and Esther, '26, 
^are assisting him in the research 
essential for the completion of the 
publication. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Kalo's opening program Friday 
night will be made up entirely of 
welcome talks by old and student 
Kalos. Refreshments and smokes 
will be served. All new male stu- 
dents are cordially invited to attend. 



SOCIETIES PRESENT 

A JOINT PROGRAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Jill. The next page showed "the lit- 
tle girl with a curl in the middle of 
her forhead," Ann Kiehl, who came 
to life and recited "The Moo Cow 
Moo". Next, Mary Stager and Jane 
Muth, looking just like story book 
characters, in a dance, displayed their 
ability. The closing scene showed 
Cynithia Benzing, with Mary Rupp 
excellently playing the part of her 
lover, singing "Just Like Me in a 
Story Book." 

Of the four programs that of Philo 
was the most varied, ranging in scope 
from the sacred to the humorous. 
Kermit Taylor, baritone, opened the 
program with a solo entitled "Not 
Understood." Charles (Skee) Wise, 
the "Chic" Sale of L. V. C. then gave 
a humorous monologue. The next 
number was a vocal duet, "When I'm 
Gone I Wont Forget You," by Ches- 
ter Goodman, tenor, and Paul Keene, 
baritone. The final number was a 
skit consisting of a series of jokes 
introduced by Edward Shellenberger 
and carried out by Fred Mund and 
Paul Keene. Remarks were also made 
Iby Earl Wolf, President of Phila, 
and Robert Rawhouser who assisted 
in the program. 



The Delta Lambda Sigma o[f erf , H 

a sample of their talent to thp >, 

... . c 

girls by presenting the Wa Work 

Clever as well as origina 1 , ideas w er 
portrayed. It was a well organi 2e ,j 
program due to the effort of g v 
Peck as well as the cooperation f 
the whole Society. 

The curtains were drawn! Behold' 
/There were twelve figures lookin 
as if they were indeed modeled f rom 
wax. It was early in the morning 
Madame Jardley had not as yet ar ' 
rived at her shop. Her two assist- 
ants — Jaine and Lucetts — were a 
musing themselves by rehearsing 
their new clog dance. "Mescheres^, 
Mescheres! What is ze n-eaning f 
dis" cried Madame Jerdley as s } le 
entered her shop. Immediately dus- 
ters and oil cans were busily used in 
preparing the figures for the gr^nd 
opening. 

Now the figures must be tested so 
;that they are in perfect condition 
for the customers. First, ;he un- 
usal acting of Jack Sprat and his 
wife was exhibited. Following this 
came Little Boy Blue, Cinderella 
Simple Simon (with the whale on the 
end of his line), Little Miss Muffet. 
Red Riding Hood, Prince Charming, 
and Sleeping Beauty, Little Orphan 
Anna (who had just that morning 
arrived), Jack in the Box, Giggling 
Girl, Dancing Doll, Singing Sue and 
Senonta. 

Then, the moment of moments. 
The first customer was ushered into 
the shop. Each one performed at once. 
What a commotion! But, the custo- 
mer — no other than the president of 
the Delta Lambda Sigma — recognized 
the talent exhibited. In a short 
speech she immediately bought all}, 
of it and offered it to the new girls 
that they might add to it teir talent 
and their ability to make the Delta 
(Lambda Sigma a more interesting 
and more talented Society. 

Personnal : 
Madame Jardeley — Eva Peck. 
J ape — Gladys Hershey. 

cette — Kit Yingst. 
Jack Sprat and his wife — Auguste 

Tracte and Tourle Koch. 
Cinderella — Mary Elizabeth Stevens. 
Simple Simon — Anne Gohn. 
Little Miss Muffet— Violet Morton. 
Giggling Girl — Ruth Shroyer. 
Singing Sue — Hester Thompson. 
Prince Charming — Dot Fovry. 
Sleeping Beauty — Marion Keneeger. 
Little Boy Blue — Corlene Hedceote. 
Little Orphan Anna — Marie Gel wick. 
Jack in the Box — Dot Slater. 
Dancing Doll — Helen Franklin. 
Senonta — Bets Engle. 
The President — Dorothy Hafer. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
enacted a typical "bull session" as its 
part of the joint society programs 
Friday night. The scene opened with 
a group of comfortably-clad upP er 
classmen sitting around in a circle 
attempting to harmonize on one oi 
the school's favorites. Next came a 
humorous intervention with a dumb 
frosh taking the lead. The latest 
wise cracks and jokes were cleverly 
handled with Krumbiegel acting a ^ 
the frosh and Hutchinson the "hard 
senior. Bill Barnes then ren ' 
dered a cornet solo with a rather 
odd but clever ending. Spegg th en 
favored the listeners with one of nlS 
many humorous vocal selections a 
quired during his stay in the Bron*' 
Salek and Clements pulled the {*>*' 
ous ticket "gag" with favorable 



suits — as usual the frosh got hoo 



Iced- 



Krumbeigel in disguise as one 



of t^ 



l. on e 

fair sex got away with a part ^ 
to the tune of "Saint Louis Blu eS ^ 
The grand finale came rather un ^ 
pected. Krumbiegel with the aid 
the rest of the cast pulled the BjJJ 
used but always welcome "Jack 
ton" climax. The whole prog ra .. 



was given in a spirit of fun 



and * 



an effort to stimulate the lagging 1 
terests in literary societies. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



FROM FROSH TESTS 
Pasteurization of milk is produced by evaporation. 
Glucose is found in large quantities in eggs, beefsteak, and onions. 
Radium was discovered by Burbank. 
The unborn young of an animal is termed the adult. 
Pneumonia is a disease of the muscle and brain. 

LVC ■ 



The tree labels have the native country of the tree marked on the bot- 
tom of them. Becker walked out of the Library and saw one of the tree 
labels for the first time. 

Becker (reading last line of label)— "C. and E. Usa. Why did they give 
such a big tree?" 

LVC 



Bluebaugh — "Conceit is worse than consumption. If that's so the men 
on this campus are in a bad way." 

—LVC 



Certain frosh wish they wouldn't have a fake murder. A certain upper- 
classman is glad it was a fake. 

LVC 



One frosh girl wanted to tip "Skee" Wise and Fred Christman for carry- 
ing her trunk. "Skie" doesn't mind carrying trunks but he hates to be call- 
ed a bell-hop. 

LVC 



One Soph girl, on being told that the frosh girls are dressed up in order 
to give the Sophs a chance, said, that she didn't think that they needed a 
chance. 

LVC 



A certain Prof, thinks that cocoa comes from cocoanuts. 

LVC 

Frosh Pipilen keeps track of the meals he cuts so that he may get a 
f ull rebate. Let's buy him kilts. 

LVC 



At least one freshman girl could have missed punishment, on the 
charge of being with men, if she would have told the fellow's name. 



FROSH TRIUMPH 

IN CLASS SCRAP 

(Continued from Page 1) 



-LVC- 



This school orchestra promises to be a fine one if everyone can play 
at they signed up to play. And it will be rather comic to see Becker play 

^ e harmonica, Snavely the pipe organ, "Red" Rugh the flute, and "Morose" 
or gan the accordion. If it is not successful as a concert orchestra theyj 

mi Sht try them on jazz. 



-LVC- 



Fishburn knows that a football coach doesn't have four wheels, but it is 
1 ted that he knows a tennis court isn't a place where they try tennises. 



-LVC- 



be ^jf. 111 " 8 has the frosh believing that he is a "big leaguer." Well, he may 
a bi g member of the "Dairymen's League." 



1 



-LVC- 



If 

tola i y ° U believe tne ministers don't play cards, look what Wolfe got from 
ym S three-handed Pinochle. 



-LVC- 



'tti Yankee (dining in Paris restaurant) — "There's a fly in my soup. 

& 0lI »g to complain to the waiter." 



*ibl e ^ 6C0rU * ^ an ^ ee — "You'd better not. Reading these French menus is ter- 
Maybe we ordered fly soup." 



enheiser with a large bump over his 
left eye. Various others received 
bumps which diabled them tempor- 
arily. No serious injury was receiv- 
ed, however. 

Those who took part were: Sophs 
Speg, Clements, Werner, Ulrich, Mor- 
rison, Shellenberger, Klein, Good- 
man, Dellinger, Knisely, Schrope, 
*Krumbiegel, Emenheiser, Barnes. 
Myers, Frantz, Focht, Green, and 
Brinser. Frosh: Towd Lehman, See- 
ger, Bezzell, Shrcm, Hoover, Kleitch 
Montz, Miller, Adams, Long Fridy, 
Brubaker, Essik, Trego, and Khen. 



VILLANOVA TAKES 

OPENING GAME 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Touchdowns — Highfield, Geisler 2. 

Points after touchdown — Gardner 
(place kick, 

Substitutions: Lebanon Valley — 
Orsino for Heller, Feeser for Reeder, 
Wogan for Murphy, Nye for Daub, 
Slack for Feeser, Morris for Wood, 
Kleinfelter for Leehthaler, Williams 
for Thrush, Sprenkle for Kelly, Val- 
kin for Bartolet, Kendrat for Spen- 
kle, Murphy for Orsino, Nye for 
Light. 

Referee — R. D. Evans, Ursinus. 
Umpire — H. N. Meritt, Yale. Field- 
judge — Harry J. O'Brion, Swarth- 
more. Head linesman — F. L. Gilbert, 
Williamson. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1930. 




Edward Balsbaugh '24 and Miss 
Margaret I. Hess, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. James Hess of Harrisburg 
were married August 19 in Salem 
Reformed Church, Harrisburg. Mar- 
lin Balsbaugh of the class of '32 was 
best man for his brother and W. Ells- 
worth Nitrauer '25 and Floyd Whist- 
ler '28 were the ushers. Mr. and 
Mrs. Balsbaugh will reside in Steel- 
ton where Mr. Balsbaugh is a teach- 
er in the schools. 



Grace Witmer ex '28 and Lester 
M. Kauffman '30 were married in 
Bethany United Brethern Church, 
Dover, Penna. on August 19, 1930 
by the bridegroom's father. Mr. 
Kauffman will attend the Gettysburg 
Theological Seminary this year. 



Wayne G. Sparrow '29 and Miss 
Adeline Mayhew of Colonial Park 
were married at a cermony per- 
formed in the Paxton Presbyterian 
Church in June. They are residing 
in Pittsburgh where Mr. Sparrow is 
connected with the Bell Telephone. 



In June Miss Ruth C. Harpel of 
Lebanon Penna. became the bride ot 
Albert Clemens ex '23 and later a 
graduate of Albright College. 



Edward J. Orback '28 and Miss 
Beryl Debarah Orth '28 were mar- 
ried this summer also. Mr. Orback 
has been teaching in the Galatin 
High School, Galatin, Penna. 



Miss Marian Perry of Dallastown 
became the bride of R. Rhodes Stal- 
ley '22, also of Dallastown, in June. 
Mr. Stalley has studied in Paris and 
is teaching in the Wayne High School 
this year. 



Miss Emma R. Meyer '28 and Ray- 
mond H. Koch '28 were married at a 
very pretty June wedding in Ann- 
ville. Miss Irene Miller '29 and Miss 
Anna Mark '28 were bridesmaids. 
Mrs. Koch had been teaching in tne 
Annville High School since her grad- 
uation. Mr. Koch has been teaching 
in the High School at Herminu Pa., 
where the couple are now living. 



In^ quite an elaborate June wed- 
ding Miss Ester Walmer '27 became 
the bride of Edmund Madciff of Mul- 
lica Hill, N. J. The affair took place 
in the United Brethem Church in 
Hershey. 



Mr. David Rank '28 and Miss Kath- 
erine Bowers ex '31 of York were 
married this summer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rank are now residing at Penn. 
State College where Mr. Rank is tak- 
ing some work. 



Miss Ruth Essick '29 and Grant Mi'- 
ler, ex '31 were married in Dowing- 
town i August. Miss Hazel Bailly 
'29, Marion Hoffman '29 and Ruby 
Ann Su Bateman '29 were members 
pf the bridal party. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller will make their home in Chat-, 
anooga, Tenn. where Mr. Miller at- 
tends the University of Chatanooga. 



Miss Dora M. Billet '24 became the 
bride of Robert Davis of Elensburg, 
at Harrisburg this summer. Mrs. 
.Davis for several years after her 
graduation taught in the Elensburg 
High School, but has taught in the 
Camp Curtin Jr. High School, Har- 
risburg for the past three years. 



Miss Marie Steiss '24 of Cones- 
toga, Ontario, Canada was married 
to William Spafford in Buffalo, N. 
Y., this summer. 



Miss Martha E. Early '19 and Mr. 
Harry W. Edris were married June 
26 in the Palm Lutheran Church in 



Palmyra, Penna. Miss Carrie E. Ear- 
ly '26 was bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. 
Edris are residing in Palmyra. 



Miss Mildred M,. Hackman '30 and 
and Mr. Kurtz King were married 
August 12, in the bride's home in 
Reistville. The couple are living in 
Union, New Jersey, where Mr. King 
a graduate of Juniata College, and 
a former teacher in the Cornwall 
High School,, is a member of the 
High School faculty. 



Dr. George R. bhenk '87, physician 
of KeaUing, jrenna. ched at nis no me 
sometime mis summer. 



Mrs. Rebecca Fisher Lehman, wid- 
ow of Dr. John iii. Lehman. '<4 ana 
later Proiessor ot Mathematics at L. 
;V., spent the month oi August in 
France with a group oi Ooid Star 
Mothers, bhe visited the battlefields 
and the grave of ner son, fciegt. Max 
Fisher Lehman 0/ and author of our 
Alma Mater, who was Killed in action 
at Montiaucon, September 2t, lyib. 



Donold E. Fields '24 and for the 
past two year Jrroiessor of Latin at 
-U V. has gone to the University oi 
Chicago wnere he is taking worlc in 
che graduate school. 



David H. Rank '28, Donald Rank 
32 and Roy Albright '30 motored to 
;he Pacific coast and Alaska this 
summer. 



Miss Marion Hoffman'29 and Miss 
Dorothy Kieinfelter '29 attended the 
session of the summer school at 
State College this summer. 



Miss Kathryn Long '23 who the 
past year taught m the Pitcairn 
iiigh School has accepted a position 
as teacher of French m the High 
School at Freehold, New Jersey. 



Mr. Russell Bowman '22 spent the 
summer in travel and study in Eur- 
ope. Mr. Bowman who is stuaying in 
.he Graduate School, Harvaid uni- 
versity, is also a member of tne fac- 
-ilty of Boston University. 



Robert T. Comly '26 was graduated 
from the Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania at the Uni- 
versity Hospital. 

F. Douglass Beidel '20 received his 



A. M. degree from Columbia Univer- 
sity at the end of the summer ses- 
sion of 1930. Mr. Beidel since his 
graduation has been connected with 
the schools of Enola, Penna. 



In June Miss Lucille Shenk '23, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Hiram H. 
Shenk was granted the A. M. degree 
by the University of Pittsburg. 



The summer of 1930 found an un- 
usual number of Lebanon Valley 
ammni in Europe. Among those were 
a party conducted by Mr. T. B. 
Beatty, '05 including Mrs. Beatty, '04, 
Miss Marp Bortner, '21, Miss Ruth 
Hiester, '22, Miss Pearl Seitz, '22, 
Miss Effie Hibbs, '22, and Miss Elsie 
Clark, '25. Miss Olive Darling, '21, 
secretary-registrar of the School of 
.Library Science, Western Reserve 
University, Cleveland, Ohio, . also 
spent several weeks on a European 
tour. 



Several alumni engaged in courses 
of study in foreign universities. 
Among these were Monroe Martin, 
'28, studied Mathematics under the 
noted Professor Bioschke in the Uni- 
versity of Hamburg. 



Russel Bowman, '22, was continu-i 
ing his graduate studies begun at 
Harvard in the University of Ox- 
ford, England. 



Orin J. Farrell, '21, who is a mem- 
ber of the faculty of Pennsylvania 
State College and who completed his 
work for the Ph.D. in Mathematics 
at Harvard in June, is spending the 
year in the Universiay of Munich, 
Germany, where he is enjoying the 
oenefit of a Travel Fellowship. 



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Address 



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NEW STUDENTS, 
HAVE YOU VISITED 
A SOCIETY? 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1930. 



No. 2. 



DR, BENDER DOES 
CREDITADLE WORK 



FINE EXHIBITS WILL 
BE OF INTEREST 
TO ALL 



Considerable credit is due to Dr. 
Bender, head of the Department of 
Chemistry, for his fine exhibits ar- 
ranged in the new cases recently in- 
stalled in the entrance to the Admin- 
istration Building. These cases will 
all be filled with displays of chemical 
interest, and to judge by the work 
already done, will be most interest- 
ing and instructive when completed. 
All of the work will be personally 
handled by Dr. Bender. 

The chemical processes involved in 
the manufacture of many common 
household articles is clearly shown 
by many of the displays, the mate- 
rials being provided through the 
courtesy of large manufacturing con- 
cerns with which Dr. Bender is in 
correspondence. Very complete ex- 
hibits have been obtained from the 
Aluminum Company of America, the 
Armstrong Cork Co., the Johns- 
Manville Corporation; and other- 
large firms, while several important 
displays are now being prepared for 
shipment. Among the latter are what 
Dr. Bender considers the two most 
noteworthy exhibits of the collection, 
a complete set of the important oils 
obtained from tropical plants and a 
complete set of all the important 
mineral ores of all the metals. 

In addition, set-ups of apparatus to 
illustrate the more common physical 
and chemical phenomena have been 
arranged, and will form a most in- 
structive part of the exhibit. 



MEN MEET TO DISCUSS 

PLANS FOR DEBATING 



On Tuesday afternoon a;. 1:00 
clock under the supervision of Pro- 
fessor Stokes, a meeting of all men, 
interested in debating was held in 
R oom 16 of the Administration Build- 
* n g- Plans were made for the com- 
ln g debating season. 

Arrangements were first made to 
s end a representative to the meet- 
m S of the Debating Council, an inter- 
collegiate organization, which will 
convene at Harrisburg on Saturday 
^ternoon. It was then decided to di- 
J J de the candidates into two groups 
0r the formation eventually of two 
^en's teams. Preliminary debates 
* e *e arranged for. 
Plans for debating with a foreign 
ani were also discussed. Professor 
°kes was quite optimistic, and did 
hesitate to express the opinion 
at the material was available for 
aking even a finer showing than 
j. e s Plendid record of last year. The 
of candidates include: Etter, 
GiT ^ e ^ man ' Herman, Mariano, 
i„ ^ert, Mariano, Shellenberger, 



■■tote 



usker, Mentzer, and Evancoe. 



Sub: 



scribe For La Vie Collegienne, 
Alumni. 



A SPECIAL NOTICE 

TO ALL ALUMNI 



It is the purpose of the LA VIE 
staff to publish from time to time 
items concerning the activities of var- 
ious alumni. In the past, the Alumni 
Editor has found considerable diffi- 
culty in obtaining such items. The 
staff has therefore decided to enlist 
the aid of the Alumni themselves in 
obtaining material for the Alumni 
department. 

Any alumnus having information 
at any time concerning the actions of 
other Alumni and feeling that such 
information would be of interest to 
others, is urged to forward such 
items to the Alumni Editor of the 
LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, Lebanon 
Valley College, Annville, Pa. AH 
such communications should be made 
promptly, and over the signature of 
the sender. 

The Editor thanks in advance all 
those who are willing to contribute 
in this manner toward the improve- 
ment of the newspaper of their Alma 
Mater. 



HANSEN LECTURES 
ON GANGLAND 

CHICAGO LAWYER TELLS 
OF UNDERWORLD 
EXPERIENCES 



Mr. C. Ray Hanson gave a lecture 
Tuesday morning in Chapel through 
the auspices of the Redpath Bureau. 
His topic concerned Chicago and its 
gangland rule. 

Mr. Hanson is ably qualified in 
lecturing on that specific topic in 
that he himself has experienced all 
the "rottenness of gang rule." 

The first thing that Mr. Hanson 
did was to dispell the assumption 
that Chicago led the world in crime. 
It is true, he stated, Chicago has re- 
ceived more publicity than any other 
city, but that is no reason for con- 
demning it. 

The rule of the gangs, he went on, 
was of course, due to the laxity of 
police enforcement, and this in turn 
was due to power that gangs had in 
electing certain desirables to office. 
Here Mr. Hanson related his own ex- 
perience. 

• He had been sent with another man 
to a certain election Ward to see that 
the election was carried honestly 
out. For a time nothing happened. 
fThen a high-powered car drove up to 
the place where the election was be- 
ing held and six men stepped out. 
Five entered the place and proceeded 
to vote. Mr. Hanson had however 
become suspicious and asked his as- 
sistant to get the license number of 
the car. The assistant came back 
and informed him that there was no 
license. Then the five who had evi- 
dently finished voting ordered Mr. 
Hanson and his assistant to step into 
the car. The two men did so at the 
point of four revolvers and a sawed- 
off shot gun. They were taken to a 

(Continued on Page 3) 



PEACE REIGNS 
AT CLASS HIKES 



AMBASSADORS OF GOOD 
WILL SECURE A 
TRUCE 



Evidently the efforts of the peace- 
makers in our fair land are beginning 
to bear fruit, for, when the tradition- 
al frosh hike was staged and all of 
the hikers were calmly assembled for 
the entertainment, a delightful visit 
was paid by a group of agreeable 
sophs. The boys were most obliging 
and aided in several ways to make 
the evening more enjoyable, espe- 
cially for the young ladies of the 
group. Those musically inclined 
crooned the latest, while those less so 
beat time to introduce the pugnacious 
element. After assuring their frosh 
friends that there would be no 
charge for the amusement providing 
that their hikers would not be molest- 
ed, the sophs departed in good will. 

As usual, eats were then served, 
everyone present managing to get a 
good supply. 

The chaperones were Miss Fencil 
and Prof. Behney; the guest, Eva 
Peck. 

Sophs Go Unmolested 

The following evening (Tuesday) 
the sophs held their hike. True to 
their promise, the frosh saw, heard, 
nor spoke no evil of their neighbors. 
A few of the limeilghters yodeled 
several wolf calls which served to re- 
mind the sophs that a lower class ex- 
isted, but no fireworks resulted. 

The sophs settled at a camping site 
located about three miles from the 
school. 

The main event of the evening was 
of course the food. Departing from 
the traditional weenie roast, rolls, 
cup cakes, coffee, and marshmallows 
were substituted. A program, which 
was conducted by Percy Clements, 
consisted of a talk by the president, 
a reading of Noyes "The Highway- 
man," by Miss Wallace community 
singing; solo by Early and Kruger; a 
song by the New Jersey Mosquitos — 
Speg, Morrison, and Barnes — another 
song by Goodman, and the Alma 
Mater. 

The chaperones were Miss Mary K. 
Wallace and Prof. Ohle; the senior 
guests, Willard Trezise and Dot 
Hofer. 



ANNE KIEHL IS NEW 

Y. W. C. A. TREASURER 



Due to the failure of Miss Hen- 
rietta Wagner to return to L. V. C. 
this year, the office of treasurer of 
the Y. W. C. A. to which she was 
elected last spring was left vacant. 
Miss Anne Kiehl was elected to fill 
the vacancy; she will take office im- 
mediately. 



A NOTE OF THANKS 



The Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. extend 
their sincere thanks for the delicious 
cakes donated by Fink's Bakery for 
their reception held recently for the 
benefit of new students. The cakes 
were very much appreciated by 
everyone. 



DUNMOYER TO ENTER 

TENNIS TOURNAMENT 



Claude Donmoyer, a sophomore, 
has recently indicated his purpose to 
take part in the National Inter- 
collegiate championship tennis tourn- 
ament at Haverford, Pa., next spring. 
This will be the first time that L. V. 
C. has ever had a representative to 
attempt winning such an honored and 
valued prize in intercollegiate circles. 

Donmoyer has shown what he can 
do on L. V.'s own courts, as a mem- 
ber of the tennis team, and the stu- 
dents sincerely hope that he will win 
with the same ease with which he 
took the Kiwanis trophy of Lebanon 
county this past season. 



IMPROVEMENTS 
ALMOSTCOMPLETE 



MANY ALTERATIONS ARE 
MADE IN AD 
BUILDING 



The extensive program of improve- 
ments undertaken on the campus im- 
mediately following the close of the 
Spring and Summer sessions is rap- 
idly nearing completion. With the 
completion of the work on the roof 
of the Carnegie Library Building, 
and a few finishing touches here and 
there around the Administration. 
Building, the most complete renova- 
tion to occur in many years will be 
brought to a close. 

Students of former years were 
made aware of the extent of these 
improvements at once when they re- 
turned to matriculate this Fall. Fresh 
paint was everywhere in evidence, 
particularly around the Men's Dormi- 
tory and the Administration Building 
where it was greatly needed. A beau- 
tiful retaining wall of limestone had 
been started along the south side of 
the campus, extending from College 
avenue to the south entrance to the 
campus; it will soon be completed. 
At approximately the centre of the 
wall, a fine approach, also of lime- 
stone masonry, has been constructed 
to serve as a convenient entrance to 
the campus from South Hall. 

Ad Building Is Renovated 
' The Administration Building shared 
most largely in the alterations. The 
entrance was completely renovated. 
A single set of lighted doors was 
used to replace the double set of solid 
doors which was formerly used. The 
old wooden floor was replaced with a 
tile floor, while along the walls have 
been ranged a fine set of cases for 
the display of specimens of scientific 
interest. Similar cases were installed 
in the hall outside of the Chemistry 
lecture room. 

A complete transformation was 
wrought in the men's wash-room in 
the basemen of the Administration 
Building. The walls and ceiling were 
replastered, the floor and washboard 
were completely tiled, a new set of 
lavatory equipment was installed, 
and four new showers, supplied with 
hot water by two automatic gas heat- 
ers, were obtained. Similar improve- 
Continued on Page 4) 



NITTANY LIONS 
DROP MYLINMEN 



SECOND-HALF SPURT IS 
DISASTROUS TO 
L. V. C. 



After holding Penn State scoreless 
for half a game, Lebanon Valley 
weakened and the Lions rolled up a 
score of 27-0 at State College last 
Saturday. 

Lebanon Valley not only held State 
in the first period but several times 
put them on the defensive. Our of- 
fensive worked much better than 
against Villanova while much im- 
provement was shown in the passing 
attack. Seven first downs were scoreu 
and nine passes were completed dur- 
ing the day. 

Lebanon Valley's best chance for a 
touchdown came in the first quarter. 
With the ball on our 40-yard line 
Reeder threw a long pass to Slack 
that was good for a 51 yard gain put- 
ting the ball on State's 9-yard mark. 
Williams then took in a pass and was 
forced out of bounds just a lew feet 
short of the Nittany goal line. Thia 
bid for a score was cut short how- 
ever by a disastrous fumble. 

The second half was a different 
story with the Lions doing most of 
the gaining. Their line opened up big 
holes in Lebanon Valley's line whicn 
enabled Lasich, husky fullback, to 
slip through for consistent gains, he 

Continued on Page 4) 



NEW ALBERT ACADEMY 
PROJECT IS PROPOSED 



Last Wednesday morning, during 
the regular chapel period, the Rev. 
Dr. Zeigler, head of the Board of 
Foreign Missions in the United 
Bretheren in Christ Churdh, ad- 
dressed the student body and pre- 
sented an entirely new project to 
take the place of the annual Albert 
Academy drive. Later he confered 
with the heads of tne local "Y" cab- 
inets who are now giving the matter 
their personal attention. 

The plan, which calls for the co- 
operation of Lebanon Valley's sister 
colleges, Otterbein and Indiana Cen- 
tral, is to create a fund by the joint 
(subscription of the students from 
the three institutions which shall be 
used to defray the expenses of sev- 
eral years of study in a foreign 
school for some student chosen by 
his fellows from one of the three 
schools. This student would then 
return, complete his work in his 
home school, and thus serve as a 
bond for the creation of a more sym- 
pathetic understanding between A- 
merican and foreign colleges. 

As soon as the fund would become 
sufficiently large, the first student 
would be chosen, preferably from the 
Junior class, and thereafter one stu- 
dent would be selected each year, 
alternating between the three schools. 

The. project was already enthus- 
iastically endorsed by Otterbein and 
Indiana Central. It remain? to bo 
seen what sort of action L. V. C. will 
take with reference to the proposal. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

KE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Madeline Sheddy, '31 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



IMPROVEMENTS 



In keeping with the spirit of prog- 
ress and. of improvement which seems 
so prominent on the campus at the 
present time, the LA VIE staff has 
decided to undertake a series of 
changes in the publication for which 
it is responsible. Several new de- 
partments are contemplated, as well 
as changes in some of the now exist- 
ing departments. 

As these changes become appar- 
ent, the staff sincerely trusts that it 
can depend upon the helpful criti- 
cism of the student body. Do not 
hesitate to give us your honest opm 
ion at any time about any of the lea 
tures of the paper. Remember that 
after all it is your paper and tnat 
you share in the responsibility for its 
success or failure. 

We do not invite a lot of destruc- 
tive criticism; nor do we promise to 
follow every suggestion that is oher- 
ed. Only chaos could result from 
such action. But bring in your sug- 
gestions. We want to improve the 
LA VIE and make it a really worth- 
while periodical. And we can do it, 
too, if you give us your support. 



THE DAY-STUDENTS 



Among the ariapy resuks of the 
development of rapid and cheap 
transportation is tbu remarkable in- 
crease in the number of men and 
wjnien who enroll as day-students 
in our colleges and universities. Of 
this increase, Lebanon Valley has 
reaped the full benefit, in fact, a 
most phenomenal growth in the num- 
ber of day student matriculations 
has been evident in the past few 
years. 

Since the accomadations of the col- 
lege for resident students have be- 
come fairly constant, this increase 
has of course meant that the propor- 
tion of the entire student body made 
up of non-resident students has 
steadily risen and will, in all prob- 
ability, continue to rise in future 
years. As a result, a series of new 
problems faces tjhe students of L. V. 
C, and it is an open question as to 
whether or not the most judicious 
means are being employed with a 
view towards reaching a solution. 

The first difficulty is, of course, 
that the amount of participation in 
the extra curricular activities of the 
school on the part of day students 
must necessarily be limited by their 
other engagements outside of school. 
This is their most serious handicap. 

To miss the social contacts that a 
college career affords is to miss a 
goodly part of the benefits that col- 
lege training has to offer. But the 



handicap is two-fold, for the resident 
students also lose through the non- 
cooperation of the day students in 
campus activities. A rapid decay of 
campus tradition and school spirit is 
inevitable. 

Now just how can the situation be 
met? Many suggestions might be 
offered, some practical, some ot 
doubtful value. We shall try to con- 
fine our attention to a few which we 
consider practical. 

First of all, the day-students 
themselves should try to eliminate 
the feeling that they form a separate 
group, and should make it a point to 
take part in every possible activity 
on the campus, ihey should try to 
become more thoroughly imbued 
with the spirit of tne campus, 
and more thoroughly acquainted 
with its traditions. They should 
cultivate friendsmps with dor- 
mitory students, numerous friend- 
ships if at all possible, and they will 
quite naturally be lead into a fuller 
share of campus life. 

The freshmen day-students should 
be especially urged to form such con- 
tacts. All too often the day students 
awake to the fact that they have 
been missing a great deal of pleasure 
when two or three years of their col- 
lege life are already past. Vain re- 
grets are a poor consolation. Get 
busy now, Frosh, and you'll soon 
begin to see that the Administration 
building is not the only one on the 
campus. 

Our next suggestion has to do 
with the dorm students. In spite of 
all the efforts of the Administration 
toward cementing the two groups 
there still remains too much of an 
attitude of aloofness on the part of 
resident students. Out of fairness it 
should be said that this attitude is 
only natural, but we believe that it 
can be conquered. And we further 
believe that to conquer it would ben- 
efit the dorm students just as much 
as the day students. 

Let those who are responsible for 
the various activities make a special 
effort to prove to the day students 
that they are welcome to participate. 
After the day students have caught 
the cue no further efforts will be 
needed. Then let all the dorm stu- 
dents make it a policy to welcome 
non-resident students at all their ac- 
tivities, and to cultivate friendships 
with them and the barriers will soon 
be removed. 

Finally, let there be more of those 
affairs which embrace the whole stu- 
dent body, and fewer of those which 
are held for either dorm or day stu- 
dents alone, and when the one group 
needs the cooperation of the other, 
there should be little difficulty in 
securing it. Let friendship and mu- 
tual understanding prevail, for "a 
house divided against itself will fall." 



CLASS OFFICERS ARE 

ELECTED BY JUNIORS 



In a short but important session, 
the Junior Class met in Room 18 of 
the Administration building, Oct. 6, 
for the election of officers. George 
Nye handed over his cloak of author- 
ity as president to Paul Keene who 
will capably manage the affairs of 
the Juinor Class for the first semes- 
ter. The other officers elected were 
as follows: Ruth Armacost, vice- 
president; Anna Kiehl, secretary; 
Ray Pickle, financial secretary; John 
Morris, treasurer. 

In view of the work on the year 
book, these officers have been en- 
trusted by their classmen with a con- 
siderable responsibility in the dis- 
charge of which they will need the 
full co-operation of their fellows. 



Subscribe For La Vie Collegienne, 
Alumni. 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



CONCERNING MYSELF 



My early life was that of the aver- 
age American boy. In our back yard 
I made the usual mud pies and built 
the usual moated castles and in the 
orchard I scalped the usual Indians 
and scuttled the usual pirate ships. 
I had many good friends, with one 
of whom I had particularly jolly 
times. We had constructed, in part- 
nership, a vehicle which had the gen- 
eral appearances of a baby coach 
and a delivery wagon. When, after 
a day of riding, there would be a dis- 
agreement between us, the cart would 
be disassembled immediately. Ar- 
thur, in a huff, would carry home the 
wheels, while I, in equally high dud- 
geon, would stalk off with the chassis. 
The following day the wagon would 
be reassembled and would operate as 
a whole until the next severance of 
relations. 

I early showed an astounding apti- 
tude for acquiring long, unusual 
words and a fund of general knowl- 
edge. Teachers were often surprised 
and amused to hear a boy of eight 
years use words such as "ejaculate" 
and "hallucination". This trait, as I 
grew older, became less pronounced 
and was supplanted by a genuine de- 
sire for useful knowledge. 

The bulk of my attention in high 
school was claimed by such dissimi- 
lar subjects as mathematics and 
music. My heroes were not those 
of the battlefield or gridiron; they 
were Beethoven and Leonard Euler. 
I read the biographies of these two 
men and was particularly fascinated 
by the story of how Euler completed 
in three days a calculation for which 
other great mathematicians asked 
four months. I endeavored earnestly 
to follow his example and assidious- 
ly worked at difficult problems until 
I realized that time and resolve were 
not sufficient to produce a correct 
solution. Instruction also was need- 
ed, so I commenced a course of spe- 
cialized study which eventually led to 
college. 

My musical education started 
when I was seven years old, at 
which time I was enrolled as a boy- 
soprano in a church choir. Although 
the choir boys were a group of hard- 
ened reprobates, they were well 
trained, and the instruction I re- 
ceived there was very useful in later 
musical activiites. When twelve years 
old, I took up the study of the clar- 
inet at the suggestion of my mother. 
I played in the school band and or- 
chestra and in a local concert band, 
so the clarinet proved to be a source 
of pleasure and profit. 

My liking for mathematics, espe- 
cially geometry, interested me in the 
principles of correct reasoning, so it 
was natural that I should be attract- 
ed to debating. Here I was con- 
fronted by an awkward difficulty, an 
excessive diffidence which made me 
self-conscious when speaking in pub- 
lic. To overcome this, I sought every 
opportunity for speaking before an 
audience, and by sheer repetition and 
practice accustomed myself to pub- 
lic appearances. 

During my last year in high 
school, I endeavored to cultivate a 
scientific manner of thinking. My 
efforts went somewhat awry, result- 
ing in a type of silly cynicism. I am 
now convinced that a scientific mode 
of thought will come only through an 
intelligent study of science and is not 
to be assumed at will. 

My life has been, and will be, occu- 
pied largely in trying to change my 
personality for the better. The good 
traits I have endeavored to develop, 
the undesirable ones I have made an 



effort to conquer. Whether this Is 
for the best and whether I will suc- 
ceed remain to be seen. Time alone 
will tell. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



"Welcome" was the theme of 
Kalo's program last Friday night. 
An effort was made to show the real 
value of the society's work. 

Russell Morgan, the president, 
gave a short but inspiring talk. He 
told of Kalo's extensive program for 
the year and stressed the value of 
cooperation in modern societies which 
are so different from the "cut and 
dried" type of former years. Prof. 
Stokes, Kalo's faculty speaker for 
the evening gave a short talk, map- 
ping out the ideal college year which 
consists of just enough pleasure and 
just enough work. "A well balanced 
college life is just as beneficial as a 
well balanced diet," he said. 

Alvin Killey and Charles Salek 
then entertained with a snappy mind 
reading act. Kinney was the "won- 
der man" and Salek the "bather."* 
Kenneth Russell gave a talk entitled, 
"Welcome From a Senator" which 
was humorous at times but demon- 
strated the true Kalo spirit. He told 
his listeners exactly what Kalo 
meant to him and what it had done 
for his acquaintances of former 
years. Robert Roudabush, Kalo's Y. 
M. C. A. man, gave a short talk ex- 
plaining the advantages of societies 
and the real value of Kalo. He re- 
lated incidents that actually hap- 
pened, thus proving his statements. 
Incidentally, Bob made a little prom- 
ise to which Kalos of the future may 
look forward — say about 1951, if 
"they" all pass the entrance require- 
ments. 

After the close of the formal pro- 
gram smokes, ice cream, and pretzels 
were served and the whole crowd 
gathered around and joined in a 
hardy song fest. The popular airs 
both old and new were sung and 
favorable attempts to harmonize were 
made. Before departing a short pep 
meeting was held — all of the boys en- 
tering in good wishes for the State 
trip. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The first literary session of the 
season was called to order by Earl 
Wolf, president. After roll call, the 
president made his inaugural speech 
and also welcomed new students on 
the campus to Philo. 

The opening number of the pro- 
gram was a novelty number rendered 
by Warren Lebo. He played two se- 
lections, "Goin' Home" and "Spring- 
time in the Rockies," with both cor- 
net and piano at the same time. The 
rendition proved both interesting and 
enjoyable to all. 

A propos the time of the school 
year, Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace gave 
a talk on "Customs and Initiations 
of Medieval Universities." The con- 
stant titter of laughter which swept 
over his audience manifested the in- 
terest and quality of the speech, and 
also showed that the literary aspecr 
of society programs need not be 
shelved for lack of interest. 

The last numbers were two violin, 
clarinet and piano trios by Fred W. 
Mund, Harry Zech and Warren Lebo. 
"Melody in F," a classical selection 
was first given, and a lighter num- 
ber, "Plantation Melodies," was used 
as a closing selection. This trio de- 
lighted their audience and thereby 
earned instant applause. 

After the program proper, a social 
period was held in which fun and 
frolic reigned. Songs were sung, re- 
freshments were served, and stories 
were told. The whole affair was end- 
ed by a wholehearted singing of the 
Alma Mater. 




The worst disaster in flying history 
occurred on October fifth when the 
giant British dirigible, R-101, largest 
flying craft on earth, crashed to 
earth on a hillside near Beauvais 
about forty miles north of Paris. The 
crash came at 2:08 A. M. when the 
majority of the passengers were 
sleeping. Forty-seven out of the 
fifty-four passengers were killed 
The dirigibles had left Cardington 
England, on a voyage to India, to in- 
augurate air connections between the 
two countries. After the dirigible 
had reached the French coast it ran 
into a heavy storm. The weight of 
the rain beating down on the ship, 
together with its great weight, is one 
of the causes assigned to the horrible 
catastrophe. Half the results of six 
years planning, labor, and expense of 
the British Air Policy were wiped 
out, for this dirigible, together with 
the R-100, which made a trip across 
the ocean to Canada, were intended 
to link the home government, by air 
routes, with the scattered dominions. 



King Victor Emmanuel and Queen 
Helena, of Italy, have officially an- 
nounced the betrothal of their daugh- 
ter, Princess Giovanna, to King 
Boras, of Bulgaria. King Boras, 
who is thirty-six, has been known as 
the Bachelor King of Europe, having 
occupied the throne alone since 1918. 



The leaders of the Democratic 
party of New York have begun their 
campaign to elect Governor Roose- 
velt and the wets of the Democratic 
ticket. They are sending out five 
motor vans, equipped to show talking 
pictures of the candidates. They ex- 
pect to show these pictures in at 
least 200 cities and villages through- 
out the state. 



It has been discovered that Joseph 
F. Crater, missing Supreme Court 
Justice, sold $16,000 worth of secur- 
ities on May 27th, about five days 
after he was sworn in as a member 
of the judiciary. He also withdrew 
$7500 in cash from two of his bank 
accounts that same day. It has been 
indicated that Crater sold his securi- 
ties for cash, making a total of 
$23,500 in currency which he re- 
ceived in one day. Crater has been 
missing since August 6th. Efforts to 
learn what was done with this sum 
have been unavailing. 



More than 20,000 miners in the 
lower anthracite regions have re- 
sumed work. Most of the miners are 
opening up on full time schedules, 
since the approach of cold weather 
has increased the demand for coal- 
Most of these mines have not worked 
a full month since last winter. 



The annual bill for intoxicating 
drinks in the United States has in- 
creased to $2,848,000,000 despite the 
18th Amendment, according to a re 
port of the economic aspects of na- 
tional prohibition issued by the Asso- 
ciation against the Prohobition 



Amendment as a broadside aga 
arguments of prohibitionists on 
economic 



inst 
the 



benefits of the dry law. This 



figure tops by more than a 



billi 011 



dollars the drink bill of 1913, said to 
have been the peak year of Ifa 1101 
consumption before prohibition. 



■ ■ £ 

Premier Mussolini, the wearer 
many orders, has a new ribbon 
put over his chest. It is the Gran^ 
Cordon of Solomon, the hig ^J, 
{Ethiopian honor, which was con fe 
red by Emperor Haile Sallassie ' 
Ras Tafari of Abyssinia. The ord<^ 
is usually resumed for members^ 
royal family and Princes of 
blood. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1930. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



"What's the matter, old fellow? You act like you were afraid some one 
was going to shoot you?" 

"I am! I write the Dawg-gone!!" 

LVC 



Ruth (emerging from a phonetic French class) — "An-ugh, uh!" 
Truly — "With all those ug-a-ugh's, you'd think we were a lot of little 



pigs. 



Ruth— "Oui, oui." 



-LVC- 



SOME MORE FROSH EXAM ANSWERS— 

Nicaragua probably has the status of an American seaport. 
Congressional debates are printed in the Literary Digest. 
In the U. S. the official who issues and signs federal pardons is the king. 
The chief income of the modern newspaper is the sport section. 

LVC 



Don't you remember me?" 

"Well, you do seem rather fresh in my mind.' 

LVC 

"Do you dance?" 
"I love to." 
"Then let's love." 

LVC 



"I'm cutting quite a figure," said the chorus girl as she sat on a broken 
bottle. 

LVC 



Babe— "Did you kiss last night?" 

Spuggy — "Naw. After taking her to a show and dance, I thought I had 
done enough for her." 

LVC 



floor 



Don't go out 

With Rosie Teddy; 
Her old man slugged 
Three guys already! 

LVC ■ 

"Well, I've lost another pupil," said the Prof, as his glass eye fell to thte 



-LVC- 



Collegiate Clara fell out of a rumble seat the other night. When asked 
it hurt, she replied, "Only my digni ty." But we noticed that she drank a 
cak e standing. 



-LVC- 



"Why did you buy that referee's whistle ? " 
I have a date with a football player tonight." 

LVC 

Prof. — "I'll have to give you a zero this semester." 
Stude — "Well, that means nothing in my young life." 

LVC 

"I'd like to try that dress on in the window|" 

Clerk — "Sorry, Miss, but you'll have to go in the dressing room." 
LVC 

B EUEVE IT OR NOT— 

We" didn't write this column last week. 
' Queen Victoria led the rebellion against the Romans, in the third cen- 

ur y— J. O. B. 

A miss is as good as — she wants to be. 

* at first you don't succeed, remember that all co-eds are not the same. 
<l e j. ° me co-eds are so aloof and beautiful that they remind you of som<e 
C 5. te ' v Phrased poem. Others just remind you of free verse. 
Many a girl's broken heart isn't all it's cracked up to be. 

s Uli tile frosn wno eat in tne dining hall were laid end to end, they'd 
*«ach across the table. 
e was only a ragman's daughter, but she wasn't the least bit frayed: 
e loved a custom officer's daughter— but hated to declare himself. 
of ^ milv Post's book on etiquette is the most popular work in the library 
University of Oklahoma. 



[Sport Sho ts 1 

There was a large following of 
students from L. V. at Penn State on 
Saturday while an even larger fol- 
lowing is expected at Muhlenberg. 



The games with the U. S. Marines 
and Washington College are to be 
played at York under the flood lights. 
Undoubtedly a large crowd will be- 
out for the night games. The first 
one is on Friday night, Oct. 24th, 
with the Marines as the opponent. 



The boys at L. V. had a great time 
last Saturday afternoon when 
Charlie Gelbert was nearly the whole 
show in the world series game. 



Nearly everybody was rooting for 
St. Louis while all were solidly in 
back of Gelbert. 



With baseball out of the way and 
the football season in full swing, the 
large colleges start playing their big 
games this week. 



Springfield won their game last 
week. L. V. C. isn't going to make 
that long trip for nothing. Distance 
adds charm and we expect our 
"charm" to work against Spring- 
field. 



Slack continued his fine play 
against State last week — that fifty 
yard gain via the aerial route sent a 
thrill through the L. V. C. rooters. 
Keep up the good work old boy— 
we're expecting great things from 
you this season. 



Williams, another Sunbury boy, 
almost chalked up a six-pointer for 
L. V. C. against State when he caught 
a forward and stepped out of bounds 
on the one-yard line — a close call 
Williams — you'll find the "Mules" 
easier picking, we think. 



L. V. C.'s forward wall cracked dur- 
ing the last half at State week but 
they are all determined to buck the 
"Mule." 



A certain husky Albright team 
held a huskier Bucknell team, with 
the east's leading scorer galloping 
around in the backfield, to 26 voints 
last week. "Turky Day" is the date 
— Reading is the place. Sounds like 
a promise for; a good football game. 



The Gettysburg Bullets went over 
with a bang at Villanova Stadium 
last week. When the smoke cleared 
away the score was Villanova 0. Get- 
tysburg 3. Imagine the time they 
had in the old town that night — and 
why not? 



Reeder hurled some beautiful pass- 
es at State last week. Quite a bit of 
our yardage was gained via that 
t route. One pass to Slack was good 
for fifty yards. Those are the gains 
that count! 



George Nigh is nursing a swollen 
ankle he received during the game 
Saturday. He made some nice gains 
through the line too. Take care of 
it. George. We need you to help lick 
the "Mule." 



Last year Muhlenberg beat us but 
we beat them the year before. Looks 
as though this is our year, boys. 
We're out to gring home the bacon. 
Doubt if "Mule" bacon will be so good 
but we're willing to try it. Beat 
Muhlenberg! 



HANSEN LECTURES 

ON GANGLAND 

(Continued from Page 1) 



dingy room and kept there until the 
election was over. Then they were 
taken for another ride and dumped 
off in the outskirts of the town. Both 
men also received a beating at the 
hands of the gunmen. Also they were 
warned to keep silent otherwise they 
would be taken for a "good ride". 

Then Mr. Hanson told of the meth- 
ods of the gun-men. If a certain 
politician did not care to run for of- 
fice and the gangs desired his elec- 
tion a "pineapple" or bomb was 
placed on his back porch. This usu- 
ally brought results. If votes were 
needed, persons could be invented. 
This was one of the main reasons for 
the success of certain officials. Mr. 
Hanson while investigating such a 
situation discovered that seventeen 
persons whose names had been regis- 
tered never even existed, and that the 
address given for the seventeen was 
the address of a barn where only one 
man lived. And this was not the 
only fake address! 

Then Mr. Hanson cited the case of 
Mr. Becker, a cleaning and dyeing 
merchant. Mr. Becker was the goat 
of a few gunmen who sought to 
"muscle in" on his business. As Mr. 
Becker refused to give any money to 
the gentlemen they speedily resorted 
to various devices through which they 
might ruin the merchant. But Mr. 
Becker remained firm. When how- 
ever things had gone too far and po- 
lice protection had availed nothing, 
he sent for Al Capone. With this 
man Mr. Becker formed a partner- 
ship which involved the company. 
Afterwards there were no more 
bombings and Mr. Becker could truly 
sneer at the police department of 
Chicago. 

In describing that King of Gang- 
land, Al Capone, whom he has met 
personally Mr. Hanson says, "He is 
essentially a gangman but also a 
very astute business man in that he 
supplies a public demand. He is an 
organizer of industry illegitimate 
though it be and a leader of men. It 
is unfortunate that no one can say 
what heights he might have reached 
had he applied his powers to some 
legitimate enterprise." 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9; 1930. 




Samuel Meyer, '28, teacher of 
Mathematics in the High School in 
East Orange, N. J., also spent sev- 
eral weeks in European travel and 
study. 



Dr. Charles H. Arnda, '14, recently 
returned from Haiti where he wa? 
directing the work in control of cof- 
fee diseases and coffee culture at the 
government experiment station at 
Port au Prince has accepted a posi- 
tion as associate in Plant Pathology 
in the state experiment station at 
Clemson College, South Carolina. He 
will have charge of the work in cor- 
trol of diseases effecting the cotton 
plant. 



ington, superintendent of the Penn- 
sylvania Conference of the United 
Brethren church, assited by Rev. Paul 
E. Shannon, '18, of Dallastown. Mr. 
and Mrs. Oyer will be at home at the 
/Bonebrake Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 
where they will continue their 
studies. 



Among Lebanon Valley Alumni 
travelling in Europe during the past 
summer months on a tour conducted 
by T. Bayard Beatty, '05 and Head 
-of the English Department of L. V. 
from '19-'25, were Clara Eisenbaugh 
Beatty, music '04, Effie Hibbs, '22, 
Pearl Seitz, '22, Ruth Hiester, '22, 
Mary Bortner, '21, Elsie Clark, '25 
and Alice C. Hoffman, '05. 



William Hudson Behney, '25, wh 
received his masters degree at the 
University of Vermont in June con- 
ducted a course in Animal Ecology 
in the university summer school and 
is continued on the faculty for the 
coming year as instructor in Zoology 



Paul S. Ensminger, '23, has return- 
ed to Cape May, N. J., as head of 
the science department of the high 
school. He was a teacher in the de- 
partment which he now heads a few 
years ago. 



Joseph K. Hollinger, '16, directed 
the physical culture work at the Scy 
land Camp for Boys at Glcnbrook 
Lake Tahde, Nev. He was accom- 
panied by his wife, Ruth Heffelman 
Hollinger, '17. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Hollinger are engaged in teaching in 
the high schools in Los Angeles, Cal. 



Miss Edna Graham, '28. is teach- 
ing Biology in the Conemaugh High 
School and has registered in the de- 
partment of Zoology of the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh for courses lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Sci- 
ence. Her work will be done n n + V 
Johnstown extension school of that 
institution. 



Lawrence B. Derickson, '29. nn as- 
sistant in Zoology in the University 
of Pittsburgh, will teach in the Jun- 
ior College conducted by that insti- 
tion in Johnstown during the coming 
year. 



David Rank, '28, who has been 
registered in the chemistry depart- 
ment of The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania Medical School 
since graduation is attending the 
Pennsylvania State College where he 
is pursuing a course in Physics. He 
was recently married to Miss Kath- 
arine Bowers, ex '31. 



Rufus H. Lefever '17 h"8 b^e 1 " 
elected Vice Principal of the Ithaca 
High School and Principal of th" 
Night School which has an attend- 
ance of eight hundred pupils. M-" 
Lefever, after his graduation from L 
V., was graduated from Boneb"pk r 
Seminary, taught in Dayton High 
School, Dayton, Ohio, for two y?ar? 
was missionary to China from '25-'27 
and prior to his acceptance of trr 
Ithaca positions was a minister in 
Seneca Castle, New York. 



Monroe H. Martin, '28, a graduate 
i student at Johns Hopkins University 
i spent the summer studying in Ger- 
many. 



IMPROVEMENTS ARE 

ALMOST COMPLETED 

(Continued from Page 1) 



ments are nearing completion in the 
girl's rest room on the first floor of 
the Administration Building. 

In addition to the work now under 
way on the roof of the Carnegie Li- 
brary Building, the northeast reading 
room has been renovated, and new 
periodical racks have been installed. 
Quite a few miscellaneous repairs oi 
lesser importance were also made. 

The students, as well as the 
friends of the college, who have ob- 
served these renovations, all voice 
their approval. It is the unanimous 
opinion that Lebanon Valley is de- 
termined to forge ahead in every 
way, and it is hoped that the students 
will cooperate with these endeavors 
by doing everything possible to pre- 
serve these new additions to the 
property of the school. 



NITTANY LIONS 

i DROP MYLINMEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 



did most of the ground gaining and 
scored two of his team's touchdowns. 

Our team is improving steadily and 
should be in top form for Muhlen- 



berg on Saturday. Muhlenberg has a 
strong team this year but local fans 
feel sure that the Blue and White 
will score its first victory of the sea- 
son this week. In all probability 
Heller, who was out of the State 
game because of a leg injury, will be 
back at his regular place against 
Muhlenberg. 

Lebanon Valley Penn State 

Thrush L. E. Martz 

Bartolet L. T. Shawley 

Wood L. G. Zorella 

Murphy C. Kane 

Lechthaler R. G. Curry 
Kelly R. T. McMillen 

Williams R. E. Edwards 

Patrizio Q. B. French 

Slack H. B. Diedrich 

Reeder H. B. Snyder 

Nye F. B. Lasich 

Score by periods — 
Lebanon Valley 0—0 

Penn State 14 13—2? 

Touchdowns — French, Lasich, 2, 
Hoguet. Points after touchdowns — 
Diedrich 3 (placement). 

Substitutions — Lebanon Valley: 
Light for Nye, Wogan for Murphy, 
Morris for Wocd, Daub for Reeder, 
Kleinfelter for Lechthaler, Volkins 
for Kelly, Feeser for Reeder. 

Referee — M. G. Crowell, Swarth- 
more. Umpire — J. A. Buchhout, 
Holy Cross. Linesman — R. F. Steine, 
W. & J. Field Judge— F. R. Wallace, 
Washington. 



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Robert T. Knouff, '27, is now teach- 
ing English in the Camp Curtin Jun- 
ior High School of Harrisburg. H : r 
address is now 1811 Market Street 
Harrisburg, Penn a. 



On August 12, 1930, following the 
Sunday morning service in the Dal- 
lastown United Brethren church 
Mary Elizabeth Jackson became the 
bride of Russel C. Oyer, '29, of Shlp- 
pensburg. The ceremony was per- 
formed by Dr. C. E. Fultz, of Wash- 



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CONGRATULATIONS 
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ILLUME VII 



AXNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16 19:50. 



Lebanon Valley Defeats Muhlenberg 14-12 



MYLINMEN'S FIRST WIN OF SEASON 

SENSATIONAL COME-BACK AFTER FIRST QUARTER 
SLIUMP RESULTS IN CLOSE VICTORY. SLACK 
AND LIGHT STAR FOR LOCALS 



In a game which took the Leba- 
non Valley rooters from the depth 
of despair to hope and finally gave 
them the thrill of the first victory 
of the season, the Blue and White 
gave Muhlenberg a 14-12 defeat on 
their own field at Allentown last Sat- 
urday. Seven thousand people, a- 
mong which were many local fans, 
watched "Hooks" Mylin's team fight 
a great uphill battle after a very 
poor start. 

"Pete" Slack, Freshman halfback 
was the hero in this comeback. With 
Lebanon Valley having the ball on 
Muhlenberg's 25 yard line, Slack took 
in a nice pass from "Gus" Daub and 
went across the goal line for the 
winning touchdown. 

However the thrills were not yet 
over, for with one minute to play 
Muhlenberg nearly pulled the game 
out of the fire with some long pass- 
es. A Muhlenberg man nearly got 
free after taking in a long toss and 
was downed after a ,50 yard gain on 
L. Vs. 30 yard line. The next one 
was grounded over the goal line giv- 
ing Lebanon Valley the ball and end- 
ing the threat. 

Muhlenberg started the game like 
real champions as they spun off two 
touchdowns before L. V. got started. 
A fumbled punt which they recov- 
ered helped them on their way. With 
their passing attack working to per- 
fection they completed dominated the 
first quarter so that the Berg root- 
ers confidently expected their team 
to roll up a large score for an easy 
victory. 

However, the tide turned and the 
Bl ue and White showed that they 
c °uld also play a neat aerial game 
an d in addition show better ground 
Plays. Our first touchdown came al- 
m °st like the one Muhlenberg scored 
gainst us last year. Heller was in- 
terfered with on a long pass giving 
Us a large gain. From there the 
team went on steadily with "Sweeny" 
'ght taking the ball across. A fake 
lc k ending in a pass was unsuccess- 
ful for the extra point. 

Lebanon Valley kept on the offen- 
^ 1Ve > running deep into Muhlenberg's 
/'ritory. The next score came when 
he y tried to kick near their goal 
e< The L. V. line was through 
j^d blocked the ball. However a Muh- 
enbevg player recovered the ball for 
safety giving L. V. two points. 
Lebanon Valley received the kick 
again took the offensive. On a 
J* Pass, Williams grabbed the ball, 
. er a Muhlenberg man had almost 
^tercepted it, and raced to the 4 yd. 
% ^fore being downed. However 
^ e line bucks and a lateral pass 
^ e unsuccessful and Muhlenberg 
lcke d out to the 25 yard line. The 



ne xt 



of 



P'ay made up for the failure 



a few seconds before as Slack 



took Daub's pass for a touchdown. 
Lechthaler's kick for the extra point 
was unsuccessful. 

The game was wide open, being 
full of passes both forward and lat- 
eral. Both teams were working good 
in that field as nearly every pass 
found waiting arms for it. 

L. V. completely outplayed Muh- 
lenberg after the first quarter. Slack 
and Light took the ball for gains 
time and again, while Daub and Reed- 
er threw some nice passes. The rest 
of the backfield and the line played 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Y.M.-Y.W. HIKE IS 
WELL ATTENDED 

PLENTY OF FUN AND 
REFRESHMENTS 
FOR ALL 



A jolly group of about one hun- 
dred and fifty "eds" and "coeds" met 
on North Hall steps on Wednesday 
at 6:15, having responded ncbly to 
the Y. W. and Y. M. invitation. All 
were dressed in hiking attire ready 
for a good jaunt to Kreider's woods 
where a gay bonfire was burning in 
a most inviting grove. There were 
many stragglers en route but all 
were gathered together for perhaps 
five minutes — and what enthusiasm! 
Even the trees looked down and en- 
vied the merry hubub and laughter. 
Many a longing eye by many a bash- 
ful Freshman was cast toward many 
3 fair maiden around the campfire 
but those who lost their shyness in 
the scuffle for marshmallows and 
"hotdog" probably did not straggle 
home alone! All the popular L. V. 
songs were rendered in various pitch- 
es and keys, but no one cared abou' 
the noise— that's what they were 
■here for. After many dogs and par- 
ticularly the marshmallows, had dis- 
appeared, a large group circled abou 4 
u he dying embers, and the rest fur- 
nished the shadowy background. W il- 
lard Trezize acted as introducer 
spokesman, or que voulez-vous! And 
during the next twenty minutes, our 
Y. W. C. A. and our Y. M> C. A. pres- 
idents first greeted the students and 
pcke a few words and were follow- 
d by a few words from each class 
president (those that could be locat- 
d and centralised). Then sevei'al 
mtertaining solos were rendered by 
'Babe" Early, Chester Goodman and 
: 'Speg" — and Martha Kreider re-ren- 

Continued on Page 4) 



BONFIRE IGNITED 
BY RUFFIANS 

STUDENTS INCENSED AT 
UNSPORTSMANLIKE 
ACTION 



What promised to be one of the 
finest bonfires ever erected on L. V. 
C's campus was treacherously burn- 
ed by a group of six malicious in- 
trouders when, shortly after the com- 
pletion of the structure, they ap- 
peared in a car and set fire to the af- 
fair. 

Wilbur Mathias, a Freshman who 
had remained on the site, was at- 
tacked by the men, tied, and placed 
in the nearby orchard until the incen- 
dicry had accomplished the : r work 
He managed to set himself free short- 
ly after the departure of the men. 
but to late to prevent the distruction 
of the bonfire. As a result, those 
who h^b spent the day in gathering 
the meterial, those who had erected 
the bonfire itself, and the student 
body in general were deprived of the 
thrills of a celebration of victory. 

It is with keen regret that we pub- 
lish this information. The sports- 
manship of little things goes a long 
way with us. As College students 
we can appreciate a joke, and find a 
good deal of pleasure in that spirit 
But when felons take it n there own 
hands to interfere with the activitier 
of an independent body, it is time 
to the sith oyn zzworcfo- shrdl cmf 
to express cur indignation. Owing tc 
+ he insignificance of the matter, it i r 
ot likely that any investigation shall 
be launched. However, let it be known 
that it ill behoves the culprit to ex- 
pose their identity while L. V. C. re- 
mains in session. 



NEOPHYTES ATTEND 

COUNTY INSTITUTE 



The class in practice teaching was 
adjourned for the week, under in- 
structions from the office of Dr. Rey- 
nolds, head of the Department of Ed- 
ucation, to attend the various ses- 
sions of the Lebanon County Teach- 
ers' Institute which meets this week 
n Lebanon. Reports of lectures at- 
tended are required of all students 
r n the Class of Methods. 

Several of the students also at- 
tended the Dauphin County Teach- 
ers' Institute now in session at Har- 
irisburg. 



If we can't go to Springfield let's 
^o up to Harmburg and pull for the 
•eserves agaist Beckley College — 
they are wearers of the Blue and 
Wh'te too remember — they need and 
deserve cur support. 

Beckley was swamped by West 
Chester last week 46-0. 



i REZISE AND SALEK 

CALL TUG PRACTICE 



Practice has commence for the an- 
nual tug of war wnich is schedulea 
for the very near future. 

Trezise, the Sophomore coach, has 
already called practice and is pre- 
paring to surprize the spectators 
with a crack squad. Salek, who has 
been selected coach of the yearlings, 
has also begun a search of likely ma- 
terial and has high hopes of a vic- 
tory. 

Both classes have an abundance of 
huskies, and from all indications the 
tug of war this year should be a real 
struggle for the survival of the fitter. 



STAR COURSE 
'PRESENTS DRAMA 

WELL ACTED PERFORM- 
ANCE OPENS 1930 
SERIES 



On Wednesday evening the first of 
the series of Star Course numbers 
was presented in the chapel. It wat 
in the form of a Musical Comedy 
Drama and was entitled "The Violin 
Maker of Cremona." 

The story, briefly, is as follows: 
The scene is laid in the shop and 
salesroom of Taddes Ferrai, a fam- 
ous violin maker of Cremona ii 
about the year 1750 A.D. Wishing 
to make Cremona violins still more 
famous, Old Podesta left his gola 
chain to the apprentice, who wil 
make the best violin. Inspired bj 
this fine example, Ferrai has pledgee 
his daughter and his house to the 
winner of the prize. Filippo, the 
hunchback, and Sandro — a dashing 
handsome, fellow, both pupils oi 
Ferrai are favored to win. The twt 
are in love with the daughter, 
Grannina. 

Filippo and Sandrc> make violins 
which look exactly alike but yet the 
Hunchback's has a more mellow torn 
than does that of Sandro. In order 
that he may win the girl Sandro se 
:retly exchanges the violins as they 
lie in their cases — Filippo wanting 
to do a good turn and help Sandn 
win Giannina also exchanges the vie 
lins and they are played by then 
original owners at the contest. 

Filippo decidedly the better easily 
wins the the prize of the gold chain 
but, even though Giannina says she 
is in love with him, he refuses to ac 
accept her. In order that she may 
not be required to marry him, a 
hunchback, he confesses that h 
traded the violins and makes them 
believe that the violin which he 
played was really made by Sondro. 

Sandro finally marries the daugh- 
ter, Diannina and "The Violin Makei 
of Cremona" ends, well deserving it? 
title — A Musical Comedy Drama Tha" 
Will Live Forever. 



DELPHIANS HOLD 
ANNUAL HIKE 



TRADITIONAL CANDLE 
CEREMONY IS 
ENACTED 



On Thursday afternoon Oct. 9, the 
members of Delphian Literary Socie- 
ty entertained the Freshman girls on 
a hike which led them to their usual 
haunt along the "Quittie." 

All the glamor and romance of the 
"Robinson Crusoe" life pervaded the 
atmosphere, as the skit, '"Hidden 
Treasure", was presented by a group 
of old Delphians. A sea-fight in which 
real pirates participated, and in which 
the heroine, a charming English gin, 
was captured, formed the basis of 
this feature of the entertainment 
Suspense filled the minds of the on- 
lookers as the rough, uncouth pirates 
tortured their frightened captives 
with taunts and jeers, and then again 
when the hero, to all appearances 
lifeless, was discovered and dragged 
on the scene, his body searched, and 
a map secured; and finally when, bent 
on obtaining the treasure, the pirated 
dashed off, forgetful of their cap- 
tives. What exciting action followed 
when the lover awakened from his 
lethargy and reclaimed his own, and 
when both began digging frantically 
for the treasure which was just in, 
sight when the loud shouts or' the 
pirates again rent the air! Buc retiei 
followed, as the returning group 
proved to be the friends of the lov- 
ers with the pirates in chains; and 
the affair ened delightfully when all 
present were invite to a share in the 
treasure! 

Those taking part in the above pre- 
sentation were: Hero, Dorothy For- 
ry; Heroine, Eva Peck; Pirate Chifc- 
tan, Mary Elizabeth Engle; Pirates, 
Kathryn Yingst, Anne Gowan, Marie 
Gel wicks, Auguste Trachte and Ru.h 
Shroyer; Friends of hero and heroine 
Trula Koch and Helen Peterson. 

Much fun an frolic followed as the 
hikers participated in a number of 
group games in charge of Mildred 
Christiansen. But a "leaping, roar- 
ing" camp-fire an appetizing odors 
soon wrought their magic effeet up n 
the crowd, and all were summoned 
to an ample outdoor repast. 

Then, in the silence and gathering 
darkness, tradition exercised full sway 
Two figures arrayed in white, ap- 
peared by the water's edge; and the 
President, Dorothy Hafer, sang "Bv 
the Waters of Minatauquet" wh ch 
lent an effective touch to the closing 
scene; Caroline Fisher then read a 
paper concerning the giving of the 
aracle at Delphi. Both girls finally 
enacted the beautiful candle scene, 
always a part of the Delphian pro- 
gram; in awe and quietness the g ro#p 
watched the lighted candles sailing 
silently down the stream— a beacon 
and a guiding ray to Delphian; down 
through the years. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE; THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1930, 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

REPORT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Madeline Sheddy, '31 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krunioeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '62 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Ciionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Fhilokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

F. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
oftlce as second ciass matter under tne 
Act of March 3, lS7a. 



rival schools. But be that as it may 
the remedy for such ills is the same 
in all cases: keep a guard of suffic- 
ient strength on duty at all times. 

Every effort will of course be made 
to give those who were responsible 
for the premature kindling of the 
fire their proper due for the unlaw- 
ful measures taken. But whatever 
we may do now, the men of L. V. C. 
ought to be ashamed of themselves 
for leaving the protection of a pros- 
pective bonfire to one Freshman. 



ijrtje; LiTEKAliY SOCIETIES 



A great improvement has been ob 
served by many of the upper-class- 
men in the programs rendered by the 
Literary Societies in their first ap- 
pearance on the campus. ''More up 
to date" is the common characteri 
zation of these initial attempts, in 
view of the rapid decline in the in' 
terest taken in Society work, this new 
attitude is most significant. 

This decline is now generally con- 
ceded to be real, and not imaginary 
Although it was gradually becoming 
apparent over a period ox five years, 
the last two years brought out the 
lack of interest in sharpest reliet 
Failure to modernize programs anu 
to devote /sufficient time to their 
preparation were doubtless the main 
causes. It is still a question whether 
both have been removed entirely, but 
at any rate, steps have been taken in 
that direction, and these steps are 
meeting with success. 

It is sincerely hoped by all to whom 
the traditions of the campus are dear 
that interest in the Literary Societies 
will again be revived. We believe 
this is possible, if the proper meas- 
ures are taken. Much depends upon 
the officers now in charge. If the 
interest of the Freshmen can be a- 
roused the problem will in large meas- 
ure be solved. A more up-to-the- 
minute program, based upon topics 
of current interest will go a long 
way toward obtaining this interest. 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



CONCERNING MYSELF 



BON-FIRES 



The celebration of a football vic- 
torp with a bonfire is an ancient cus- 
tom on many campuses. In this re- 
spect, Lebanon Valley is no exception. 
Her alumni can testify to the cele- 
bration of many glorious victories, 
and the building of many magnificent 
bonfires during the course of those) 
celebrations. 

In recent years however, the local 
traditions seems to be changing. We 
still send the Freshmen all over the 
township in search of combustible 
material; we still pile that material 
as high as the combined ingenuity of 
the men can devise. And then we 
toddle off to our rooms in the dorms, 
slump comfortably into our easy 
chairs, and invite the youngsters of 
Annville to see if the pile will burn. 
As a rule, too, their efforts are most 
notably successful. 

Isn't it just about time for this 
nonsense to stop? It is quite time 
that local "hoodlums" can scarcely 
be blamed for the occurrance of Mon- 
day night. The whole affair looks 
suspiciously like a case of poor sport- 
manship on the part of one of our 



There must have been a party in 
heaven the night I was born, and the 
Gods were so busy that they gave me 
the mixture of what they had on, 
hand. That was bad luck enough for 
me, but to make it worse, one of the 
little imps from the lower regions 
must have sneaked in during the ex- 
citement. Standing by the Grand 
ivlixig Pot, he proceeded to donate 
his contributions to me — or the mix- 
ture that was to be me. He had al- 
ready thrown in a good share of tem- 
per, an insane desire to do outland- 
ish things, and, worse than any, the 
excellent proverb, "Always put oil 
till tomorrow what you could do to- 
day," before my Guardian Angel 
came around, surprized him in the 
act, and ejected him with all the 
usual formalities and trimmings. My 
imp was gone for the present, but he 
overtook me on my way earthward, 
and "sticketh closer than a brother" 
to me ever since. 

No one seems to have discovered] 
sex of the angels as yet; but I'm pos- 
itive mine must have had the female 
gender, and more or less feline char- 
acteristics, which, indicentally, she 
handed on to me. But, to come back 
to my story, after kicking him 
through the Golden Gates, she stole;! 
back to look at the debris. She hated 
to interrupt the crap game in which; 
the Head Mixer was engaged at thatj 
time, so she took it upon herself to? 
try to doctor me up, in order to make 
me look all right at least.. I haven't 
any idea of what she put in except 
that she did give me the Heavenly 
Blessing of being able to forget 
everything I don't want to remember. 
Of course this doesn't always run 
true to form as there is an exqep-; 
tion to every rule. Then my Angel'; 
very generously put a bump on my| 
nose as a distinguishing characteris- 
tic, as she was slightly bewildered at 
the time from drinking too much nec- 
tar; dispatched me earthward under 
the chaperonage of the stork, and,^ 
hasted back to join the Head Mixer. \ 

When I arrived, I immediately set 
up a mournful howl, which my fondj 
parents explained was caused by the!; 
coming of my teeth. Well, my teeth 
arrived one by one, usually being! 
cut, with a vengeance, on the finger 
of some too curious visitor, but the 
howling still went on. I might add 
that my good disposition was not 
very much improved by having the 
name of Mary Elizabeth bestowed 
upon me. At length the Family was 
forced to explain that I was exercis- 
ing my "unusual lungs." My favor- 
ite position was reclining on my back, 
feet in air, with both little fists tight- 
ly clenched in the little bit of fuzz-, 
which adorned by cranium, screaming 
at the top of my voice. Oh, it was 
quite exciting to see the big "giants" 
run when I emitted- a particularly 
blood-curdling war-whoop! 

I managed to wreck the place when 
I was a baby. I had the happy fac- 
ulty of grasping articles in just the 
right place to be pulled off and brok- 



en. It was the Reign of Terror in 
the house at that time. The Family 
was seriously considering putting up 
sheet iron curtains. Beads were ban- 
ned; coal was kept under lock and 
key; all the bric-a-brac was removed. 
Once, while in my carriage, I saw the 
paternal watch and lifted my voice 
unto the hills in a long, drawn-out 
wail of despair.. Before my mouth 
was in the proper position for 
resonance, that watch was in my 
hands. The celestial smile, which they 
say all babies have, wreathed my 
lips and was, for a second, the little 
cherub I should have been. Two min- 
utes later the watch was through the 
opposite window, and I was posed 
gracefully upon my head on the 
floor. Then indeed the tears de- 
scended and the floods came. 

As I progress through my infancy 
my Guardian Angel and my Imp 
were forever fighting together and 
leaving m to go on alone. At one of 
these times I was christened; but I'm 
sure the Imp won. The event took 
place in the front parlor, with the 
minister and the parents artistically 
grouped on a new rug. With my 
usual presence of mind, I was the 
perfect child and everyone was 
beaming with pride when, during the 
prayer, I received my inspiration to 
drink from the shiny cup. I reached 
for it but it was out of my grasp. 
Then began a series of squirms and 
wriggles; but the minister prayed on. 
The family exchanged agonized 
glances. At last my temper and one 
fat little leg came to the fore and I 
gave that cup a kick which would 
have been a credit to a football 
player. Is there enough said, or must. 
I enlarge on the subject? 

I was also blessed, or cursed, with 
a girl cousin my own age, with whom 
I was practically brought up. She 
must have had a pet imp too, for 
what I didn't think of she did. We 
passed a very peaceful and calm 
childhood, as you can imagine. About 
the first thing I can remember is the 
historic Great Valentine Battle. We 
had received about a million valen- 
tines, more or less, and one morning 
we stood them all up around the nurs- 
ery wall. All went merry as a mar- 
riage bell until it was time to put 
them away. Like the lilies of the 
field, we toiled not, neither did we 
put away, but we stood back and 
bossed the job. When they were al- 
most all in their places, the inevit- 
able dispute arose over one poor little 
"two for a cent" one. Soon we were 
in each other's arms, but not very 
lovingly. 

My first real accident was when the 
craze to be Indians overtook me. We 
made a wigwam out of clothes props. 
First came a fight about names. Jane 
decided to beat me and became Big 
Chief Know-It-All. For the life of 
me I couldn't beat that, until my Imp 
whispered "Big Chief Know-Even- 
More." From that moment we were 
savage braves, besieged by the Pale- 
faces. Big Chief Know-Even-More 
was the head scout and had the posi- 
tion of honor on top of the wigwam. 
There had been mutiny in the ranks 
over this position but Big Chief 
Know-It-All, being smaller took the 
lower place. In the act of trying to 
climb from the top of the shed roof 
to the top of the tepee, he stepped on 
a loose pole, and the wigwam pro- 
ceeded to collapse. Big Chief Know- 
Even-More made a three point land- 
ing on the ground to the horror of: 
his comrades. Much honor and atten-i 
tion were his, however, for he broke 
his toe in the noble service of a dying' 
race. 

A little later the desire to earn 
our own living struck us. I was again 
visiting my cousin and, after a ser- 
ious talk on the problems of man- 
kind, we decided to revolutionize the 



soap industry. We smuggled all the 
soap we could find to the bathroom 
and made as many soapsuds as we 
could, ours Imps at our shoulders 
urging us on. First we had to over- 
come our terrible distaste for soap 
and water, but once we were started 
and thoroughly soaked, we were hav- 
ing the time of our lives. As the 
families were away, we spent a most 
enjoyable and progressive afternoon. 
It was with a smug smile, and a 
sense of well doing, that I set the 
pan containing soapsuds into the ice- 
box, to turn to soap — the soap that 
would make history, and our family 
fortunes. As it was a rather warm 
day, the icebox was crowded, so we 
moved the butter, milk, and prob- 
ably some other things to make room. 
We didn't know what to do with the 
things, so we left them on the floor, 
meaning to return later and clean up. 
Soon we forgot all about our soap, 
and went out to play. In the mean- 
while, Nemesies, in the guise of the 
families, followed and caught us. 
They returned home, saw the wreck 
of the bathroom, the butter melted, 
the milk soured, and set up a great 
hue and cry for their darlings. I 
shall draw the curtain of silence 
over the painful scene which follow- 
ed; although between each downward 
sweep of the hair brush we were as- 
sured that it hurt them more than it 
did us! My illusions about the grat- 
itude of the human race and the hon- 
esty of our elders took wings that 
day. 

There was one more "high light" 
of my early life that I remember 
vividly — too vividly in fact. The 
high light appeared on our faces — it 
was the day we discovered the use 
of cosmetics. When we were about 
eight years old Jane and I were both 
secretly enamoured of the boy who 
lived next door — a young man of 
twenty. We despaired of being no 
ticed until one day Divine guidance 
led me to see the rouge box. That 
afternoon I held a seance all by my 
self, and when I was in the act of 
beautifying myself for my hero's 
eyes, Jane bounced into the room. 
After the usual preliminaries of "I'm 
going to tell on you!" Jane was per- 
suaded to be a partner in crime 
When we arrived at the end of the 
rouge and powder, not to mention 
the rest, we looked as if we had 
sneezed in a flour barrel and run 
against a freshly painted barn, while 
the fronts of our starched white 
frocks were a sight! Something seem- 
ed to warn us, probably our respec- 
tive Guardian Angels, to sneak out 
the back way in search of the object 
of our affections, but Fate was 
against us when we heard with hor- 
ror the maternal footsteps approach- 
ing. No hiding place being near, we 
sat down in the middle of the floor 
and buried our heads in our arms. 
When discovery came, no one could 
have been more surprised than I. 
Ah, cruel and unjust world! 
(To Be Continued) 



lations one encounters when travel. 

Sonny Russell and Corker Becker 
played a number of snappy unusual 
selections that were received with the 
usual "glad hand". Russell played the 
trumpet and Becker his trusty banj 
Philip Barnes gave a vivid descrip. 
tive account of his camp life this 
summer. He spent quite a lot f 
time in the great out-of— doors arid 
had some very unusual experiences 
to pass on. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Kalo held its regular meeting Fri- 
day night in the society hall. A well 
balanced literary program was pre- 
sented with a little music now and 
then to add the necessary "spice". 
Russell Morgan, the president, gave 
a short talk and welcomed those who 
were present for the first time. 

Joe Hutchinson then gave an in- 
teresting account of his travels this 
summer. Joe toured the western 
section of the country extensively and 
had many thrilling incidents to re- 
late. His means of travel was the 
much talked of "Model A"— this fact 
made the talk all the more interest- 
ing because everyone was well ac- 
quainted with the trials and tribu-' 
ing "A la Henry". 



The opening program of the Ciio- 
nian Literary Society was presented 
Friday, October 10, at 8 p. m. After 
the devotional exercises which were 
held in Clio Hall, the new girls and 
Clio members were ushered to North 
Hall parlor. There, seated at small 
tables which were artistically deco- 
rated and arranged in Spanish cab- 
aret fashion, the girls witnessed a 
program typically Spanish. 

The scene was laid in the Patio 
Royale, where a great celebration 
was about to take place. All the fam- 
ily was assembled and in merry 
spirits as Kathryn Lutz, the "Mad- 
re" beautifully sang a selection from 
"Carmen." After having excitedly 
discused the coming festivities, the 
family wondered away and left the 
salon to two lovers, Carmelita and 
Carlos (Ann Kuhl and Dorothy Gar- 
ber). These two young folks, uncon- 
scious of the hustle and excitement 
going on all about them, chatted and 
sang to each other the song which 
Carlos had written for Carmelita. 

The second scene, in the Patio it- 
self, opened with Carmelita's singing 
"Do You Love Me?" The next e- 
vent in the festival was the dance of 
the tambourines by Jane Muth, "Char- 
lie" Mummert, and Mary Anne Rupp 
concluded the celebration with an ex- 
cellent demonstration of the tango. 

Refreshments, colorful as well as 
appetizing, were served to the spec- 
tators. After this, the tables were 
removed, and the remainded of the 
evening was spent in dancing and 
jollity. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



President Earl Wolf called the 
second meeting of the Philokosmian 
Literary Society to order on Friday 
evening. Acting Chaplain, Harry 
Zeck, conducted devotions, using Ro- 
mans XII as his basis. After roll 
call Robert Rawhouser presented the 
first number of the program. He gave 
an interesting detailed account of the 
recent R 101 disaster. In the talk 
he showed graphically that man has 
not yet completely conquered nature. 
This current event proved both M" 
teresting and helpful. 

The next number was given by 
Robert Eshleman. He rendered "Son- 
ata Pathetique" by Beethoven, and 
then in responce to very hearty ap- 
plause he played "Polichinelle" by 
Rachmaninoff. His splendid rendition 
and faultless technique! combined 
with the attitude of ease with which 
he played throughly delighted every 
hearer. 

The final number was given by an 
"old Philo", professor Behney. ^ ltn 
great solemnity he proposed in nlS 
talk that inasmuch as Philo is V v ° m [ 
inent in all progressive campus 1 
ovations she should foster and exe 
cute a "new Proposal" which 
would suggest. The proposal pr° 
exceedingly attractive, especially 
the Frosh, for it was that we trans- 
fer all Frosh rules to the Faculty ^ 
the near future. The following tn ^ 
this revolutionary suggestion £ alfl 
was attested by the great apP laUS J 
Warren Lebo, critic, gave h |S 
marks, and the meeting closed 
open in a social and recreation P erl 
immediately afterward. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



I've seen a house sans chimney 
— A ship without a sail 

But the coldest thing in winter, 
Is a shirt without a tail. 

LVC 



"He says he's from New York." 
"New York? Why that big four-flusher! He's from a town so small, 
they don't even have movies!" 
"How do ya know?" 

"I talked with him for half an hour, and he didn't say 'Yeah?' once." 
LVC 

"Keep this on tap," said the director as he showed the chorus a new step. 

LVC 

Mother — What do you want for your birthday, darling ? 
Modern Child — I wanna have one of those "rich man's playthings" I've 
read so much about. 

LVC 

Along with the sailor who spends his leave rowing in Central Park, and 
Jthe mailman who goes for a walk on Sunday, we nominate the riveter who 
takes his Saturday afternoon off to go to a 'talkie.' 

LVC 

EXPERIENCE SHOWS THAT: 

1. The graduate who was always late to class will become mayor of 
New York. 

i 2. The student who lived to play pranks on people will become Phila 
delphia's Director of Public Safety (whether or not he raids the Ben Frank 
lin will of course, be optional). 

3. The debater who was never out-talked in college will become a hen- 
pecked husband. 

4. The incurable bridge fiend will remain the incurable bridge fiend. 

LVC 

Simile — As despairing as the little boy who ran away from school, only 
to find he'd stowed away on the Floating University. 

LVC — 



She — Have you heard the last thing about Rudy Valee? 
He— No, but I'd like to. 

LVC 



About the only large thing about these miniature golf courses is our 
score. 

LVC 

Ruth — You want zoup? 



Ann — Do I got to take zoup ? 
Ruth — That's zoup to you. 



-LVC- 



"Every morning you are my first thought." 
"Your roommate tells me the same thing." 
Oh, but I get up an hour before he does." 

LVC 

"Is Jack hot?" 
"I'll say he is." 
"How do you know?" 

"Didn't you see the cinders on the track after his race." 

LVC 

"That was a dirty trek," said the African exployer, dusting off his 
Rothes. 

tho 



-LVC- 



"Will you love me forever?" 

f'l don't know," coyly replied the fragile young thing, as she gazed at 
^ beautiful necklace he had given her, "but I love you for the present." 

LVC 

^LIEVE IT OR NOT— 

' SLove laughs at locksmiths, but anything that's laughed at as much as 

Ve has to retaliate somehow. 
, The big question of the hour is whether or not a Siamese twin would 
^Ve to pay double tuition at a university. 

Once a Scotchman didn't go to a banquet because he didn't know what 

e Word gratis (incidentally, this is pronounced 'graytis') on the invitation 

6 ^nt. The next day he was found dead before an open dictionary. 



MYLINMEN DEFEAT 

MUHLENBERG 14-12 

(Continued from Page 1) 



great football. 
The Lineup: 
Lebanon Valley 



Thrush 

Bartolet 

Wood 

Murphy 

Lechthaler 

Volkin 

Heller 

Patrizio 

Daub 

Slack 

Light 



Muhlenberg 
G. Gernerd 
Sobel 
Weiner 
Vincent 
Parillo 
Matuska 
Giltner 
Palladino 
Weber 
Batalin 
Majercik 



L. E. 
L. T. 
L. G. 

C. 
R. G. 
R. T. 
R. E. 
Q. B. 
H. B. 
H. B. 
F. B. 
Score by periods: 

Muhlenberg 12 — 12 

Lebanon Valley 6 2 6 — 14 

Touchdowns — Batalin, 2; Light, 
Slack. Safety — Majercik. Substitu- 
tions — Lebanon Valley: Wogan for 
Murphy, Reeder for Daub, Kelley for 
Volkin, Kleinfetler for Wood, Will- 
iams for Thrush, Orsino for Slack, 
Daub for Reeder, Slack for Orsino, 
Reeder for Daub. Referee — R, E. 
Kinney, Trinity. Umpire— R. L. Fite, 
Dowdoin. Head linesman — M. S. 
Scureman, Princeton. Time of per- 
iods, 15 minutes. 



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ANNVILLE, PA. 



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STEVE WORNAS 



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Annville, Pa. 



WE PHOTOGRAPH 
ANYTHING, ANYTIME, 
ANYWHERE 

ULRICH'S STUDIO 

820 Cumberland Street 



For 



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Colored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Attention Alumni! 

Your check or money order for $1.50 enclosed with the following 
blank properly filled out will secure for you a full account of the activ- 
ities of your Alma Mater each week. 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 
I am enclosing $1.50 for a year's subscription to the LA VIE COL- 
LEGIENNE. 

Signed 

Address 



SHEET MUSIC MUSICAL BOOKS 

MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 



738 Cumberland Street, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 



TELEPHONED 

fJMother and Dad 

p 




IT GIVES SO MUCH 

and 

TAKES SO LITTLE! 

There are few things you can do that will 
give the folks as much pleasure as a tele- 
phone chat with you; and mighty few 
that will give you such a thrill! 

All it takes is a few minutes of your time; 
a very small bit of effort, and a tiny share 
of your pin money. (Charges can be re- 
versed, for that matter.) 

Go to a telephone tonight, give your 
home telephone number to the Operator 
— and in a jiffy you'll be home again. 

Make a date to telephone home on a certain 
evening every week. 





PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOl'.F? U>. 10:O. 



Sport Sho 



L. V. will be after its second vic- 
tory at Springfield where a hard bat- 
tle is expected. Springfield lost to 
Harvard 27-0 last Satuiday. 



While the regulars are up in Mass- 
achusetts, the reserves will play a 
game against Beckley College in Har- 
risburg on Friday afternoon. That's 
the chance many of the boys are 
waiting for. Good luck gang. 



Cal. Heller got back in the Muh- 
lenberg game and played the whole 
time. 



"Ollie" Orsino made his debut in 
the backfield having been shifted 
there from end. He played well while 
he was in the game. 



The "Reeder to Slack" combincv 
tion that made its debut in the State 
game surely did "click" Saturday. 
Muhlenberg is still wondering how 
it all happened. 



Overcoming the Mule's 12 point 
lead proved that L. V. C's gridiorn 
crushers are not beaten until the last, 
play is over. That was a wonderful 
comeback, gang — keep up the good 
work. 



Kelly almost had a touchdown S it 
when he helped to block a kick b3 
hind the goal line. That's alright 
Kelly — we don't want the linemen to 
outscore the backs anyway. The two 
points was enough to win the game. 



Sweeney Light was the first L. V 
C. man to chalk up a six pointer thh 
season. He also made the first touch- 
down last season when he intercept- 
ed a Villanova pass and raced 75 yds. 
for a score. 



L. V. C. will be well represented 
at the Springfield game Saturday 
Rumors indicate that at least a half 
dozen cars are planning on making 
the three hundred and fifty mile 
jaunt. 



Albright nosed out Mt. St. Mary 
12-7 in the last five minutes of play 
last Sat. Seems as though there's er> 
ing to be a tcu^h battle in Emmits- 
burg, Md. on Nov. 1st. 



Juniata lost to Drexel last Sal 
but they are not to be overlooked 
They have a pair of good backs and 
a fast charging line. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

HOLD FIRST MEETING 



On Thursday evening the eombin 
ed Ministerium and Life Work Re- 
cruits of the college hcM their firs 
meeting. After some singing, devo- 
tions were conducted by Joseph Ret- 
tew. Following this, Chester 0. G^od 
man and Paul K. Keene rendered a 
sacred duet entitled "Jesus Lover of 
My Soul". The fine tone and har- 
mony of the pair in their rendition 
created a proper spiritual atmosphere 
for the gathering. 

' Ray Harris then introduced the 
speaker, Rev. Harry Miller, D. D., of 
Lebanon. Speaking out of the full 
ness of his heai't, and from an exper 
ience of thirty-seven years in the 
ministry, he suggested solutions to 
certain pi-oblems which the young 
Recruits must face. Among other 
suggestions he recommended a solid 
Scriptural basis for young ministers 
In the business meeting, Harry 
Zeck was elected secretary, and com 
mittees were appointed for the com- 
ing school year. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



The monoplane Columbia, enroute 
from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, to 
Croydon, England was forced down 
on the island of Tresco, one of the' 
Scilly Isles, off the southwestern 
coast of England. Motor trouble 
forced the plane down when within 
300 miles of her goal. 



Jack (Legs) Diamond, notorious 
gangster, rachateer, and beer-runner 
who recently gained world-wide fame 
when he was refused admittance to 
several European countries, was ser- 
iously wounded by four bullets from 
pistols of unknown assailants. He 
told detectives he was sitting in his 
\-oom in the hotel when the door was 
suddenly opened and four men step- 
ped in, firing at him immediately. 
The assailants made a quick and safe 
?et-away. 



Pernambuco, the largest city in 
Brazil, was captured by the rebel 
rorces, after a 48 hour fight. Cacual- 
ies resulting from the outbreak were 
50 dead and wounded. 



Delegates from 62 countries (at- 
ended the International Road Con- 
gress, held at Washington, D. C. last 
week. This was one of the most] 
'osmopolitan gatherings held in this 
•ountry. There were 218 foreign del- 
■gales frcm Europe, Asia, Central 
lid South America. Four official 
languages, English, French, German 
were used by the interpreters to 
broadcast all speeches simultaneously 
in each of the four tongues. 



Governor Long, of Louisiana, has 
ppointcd Miss Alice Le Grosjean, his 

private secretary, as Secretary of 

^tate, fucceed'ng the late James J 

Baily, who died recently. 

Miss Le Grosjern becomes the first 
.cm-n State official in Louisiana 
nd perhaps the y. ungest Secretary 

rf State in the country, being only 

24 years old. 



Through the courtesy of authori- 
ties of Villanova College M^yor 
Mackey will invite more than 10 000 
of the city's children to attend the 
opening football game at the Mun : e- 



ipal Stadium on October 18th, when 
Villanova will play Boston College. 



Leaders of the Brazilian revolt 
have declared that the triumph of the 
revolution is only a few days away. 
An army of 80,000 men are now 
marching upon Rio Janeiro and nine 
states in both the North and South, 
rebelling against the government of 
President Washington Luis. This 
army is made up of infantry, cavalry 
and artillery from Rio Grande Do 
Sul, Santa Caterina and Parana. Gen- 
eral Da Cunha, Federal Deputy and 
leader of the revolutionary troops as- 
serted that if the revolution triumphs 
a provisional civil government will 
take charge, with elections for a 
president and congress to be called 
later. 



Y. M.— Y. W. HIKE 

IS WELL ATTENDED 



(Continued from Page 1) 



dered a number popularized on a 
previous hike. 

After another "songster" spell by 
the body-at-large, the road between 
Kreider's and the Pennway was dot- 
ted with here a group, there a group, 
and everywhere a couple, couple! 
Everyone came back evetnually — just 
another Y. W.-Y. M. hike made his- 
tory! 

Believe It Or Not! 



H. GOODMAN & SON 

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Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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CLOTHING OF QUALITY 



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Lebanon, Pa. 



NEW COATS AND DRESSES ARRIVING DAILY 
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Rose Singer Shop 

761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



LET'S GO— " 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

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_ „ 38 N. 8th St. -:- - : - Lebanon, Pa. 

W - Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 
Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 




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Morton Early Mary Burlington 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
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SINK T^E 

I.IARIKE^, TEALi! 
LET'S CO! 



rOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1930. 



No. 4 



Varsity Loses to Springfield; Reserves Win 



pR. GOSSARD CONFINED 
' TO HOME BY ILLNESS 



For several days this week, the 
president, Dr. Cossard, was confinea 
to his home by a severe cold. Stu- 
dents and tacuity unite in hoping lor 
his speedy recovery and return to 
the assumption ot nis duties. 

WOMEN MEET TO LAY 

PLANS FOR DEBATING 



On Wednesday afternoon, Prof. 
Stokes called a meeting of ail girls 
interested in debating. The results 
seem to indicate that it will be 
possible this year to organize at 
least one strong girls' team. 

Tryouts will be held in the near 
future to select a team or teams, U 
possible, from among tne following 
candidates: Eulalie Morton, Martha 
Dahly, Christine Gruber, Betty 
Shaak, Gertrude Paul, Anna Matula, 
Kathryn Mowry, and Elizabeth Le 
Fevre. 



GL10S ENTERTAIN 
JRESHMAN GIRLS 



NOVEL FEATURES ADDED 
TO TRADITIONAL 
EVENT 



L. V. C.'s new girls we^e pleasantly 
entertained at a hike of the Ciionian 
Literary Society on Thursday, Octo- 
ber 16. 

The group left North Hall at 5 
o'clock, wending their way in the di- 
rection of a picturesque spot in 
Steinmetz's woods which members of 
Clio hold dear. Here and there, over 
the entire route, were sign posts di- 
recting the adventurers toward their 
destination. At intervals along the 
w ay, the group was urged by clever, 
Mysterious injunction, tacked to 
^ees, to halt and remain there for 
a short time. Each stopping space 
represented a year of college life. 

For the first year, Lenora Bender, 
lr * the attire so familiar to the Frosh 
girls, green beret and green hose, 
Presented candy sticks to each per- 
Son - After traveling on for some dis- 
tance, a second halt was called. Here 
entered the comedy: Mary Rupp 
gave a demonstration of a frivolous 
young Sophomore busily engaged in 
her favorite sport — catching butter- 
es - Mary's appearance alone 
brought forth outbursts of laughter, 
s ay nothing of her comical acting. 
Following the directions of a wise 
d owl perched in a tree, the hikers 
Proceeded to a quite charming part 
the woods, where a short skit was 
jfesented for their approval. It was 
he story and Hansel and Gretel, two 
^ddren who wandered into a forest 
Play. Becoming tired, they lay 



wn to rest, and soon fell asleep. 



d a m , e<Il ately, fairies appeared, and 
ncil >g about the babes, pledged 
(Continued on Page 2) 



GELBERT WEDDING 
OF SPECIAL NOTE 



CAMPUS ROMANCE ENDS 
HAPPILY, AS 
USUAL 



In a beautiful wedding ceremony, 
Charles Mangus Gelbert of Ambler 
and Miss Mabel Grace Hafer of 
Chambersburg were united in mar- 
riage in the Washington Memorial 
chapel at Valley Forge. The cere- 
mony was performed by the Rev. Dr. 
W. Herbert Burk. The single ring 
ceremony was used. Mrs. Paul 
Mackey of York, presided at the 
organ. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by Alvin B. Hafer, her brother, a 
student at Raleigh College, N. C. 
The maid of honor was Miss Jean J. 
Hafer of Wilmington, Delaware, a 
sister of the bride. 

The bridesmaids were Bernice 
Hoover, of Harrisburg: Pearl Watt- 
man, of Ephrata; Mrs. Paul Piersol, 
of Coatesville, and Miss Meda Gel- 
bert, of Ambler, a sister of the 
groom. 

Fred Heilman of Lebanon, a college 
chum of the groom acted as best 
man. The ushers were Roy Albright 

Continued on Page 4) 



MEN ORGANIZE 
FOR DEBATING 



PLENTY OF SEASONED 
MATERIAL THIS 
YEAR 



On Tuesday at 1:00 P. M. the can- 
didates for the Men's Debating teams 
met in room 17 of the Administra- 
tion Building to lay the plans for the 
coming season. Questions were sub- 
imtted, a manager was selected, and 
arrangements were made to hold 
preliminary debates to determine who 
shall hold positions on the two var- 
sity teams. Twelve men were present. 

The questions submitted by Prof. 
Stokes, faculty advisor, were the 
three following, which were decided 
upon by the Intercollegiate Council 
at their recent meeting in Harris- 
burg. 

Resolved: That the nations should 
adopt a policy of free trade. 

Resolved: That the emergence of 
women from the home is to be de- 
plored. 

Resolved: That the states should 
enact laws providing for unemploy- 
ment insurance. Of the three, the 
last praved to be most popular. In 
all probability, however, debates on 
several questions will be prepared. 

It was definitely decided that Pa- 
Continued on Page 4) 



lii ueiidij. or UiO lllv.ic; stu- 
dent;.-", vve Wion t^ cacci.u ^ui 
sincere cuiig'i<rtUiai J .uiis to uic 
r acuity auu tne mku s senate 
for tne rme spirit ox Compro- 
mise ana cooperation mailn.es t- 
ed in tne course or their nego- 
tiations during tne eariy part 
of this weeic. it is tne genera '. 
opinion among the men, in- 
cluding those who were tne ob- 
jects of discipline, that tne fair- 
est settlement posibie was 
arrived at by the joint action 
of these two bodies, a settle- 
ment wnich was wen calculated 
to maintain the dignity and re- 
spect ot both. 

Vve sincerely appreciate the 
gentlemanly attitude which 
those who made tnis action 
necessary have taken toward 
the results of the negotiations. 
Their example may well be fol- 
lowed by every man on the cam- 
pus who would cultivate that 
respect for authority which is 
essential to the character of a 
gentleman. 

In view of their willingness 
to compromise m this instance, 
we feel that the Faculty espe- 
cially deserves the full cooper- 
ation in the future of every man 
on the campus. It must be 
borne in mind, that all final 
authority in matters of disci- 
pline are vested in that body, 
and, that the authority exer- 
cised by the Men's Senate is 
delegated and not original. 

We trust that in the light of 
these events and facts, there 
will be maintained in the fu- 
ture an evergrowing respect on 
the part of the men for their 
own governing body. May the 
name of Lebanon Valley College 
never be besmirched by the 
stigma that her men were dis- 
loyal to their elected represent- 
atives, and that by virtue of 
their disrespect for their super- 
iors, they lost both the power 
and the right to govern them- 
selves. 



LEBO ANNOUNCES THE 

BIRTH OF A SON 



Mr. Warren Lebo, a Senior, has 
announced the birth of a son, War- 
ren Harman Lebo, at the Polyclinic 
Hospital, Harrisburg, on Thursday, 
October 16. The child and his moth- 
er are doing fine, and needless to say, 
Mr. Lebo is in excellent spirits. 

Warren was married last Novem- 
ber to Miss Anna Marie Harman of 
Halifax, Pa., a graduate of Temple 
University, and a Dental Hygienist 
in the public schools of Halifax and 
Millersburg during the 1929-30 school 
term. 

Congraulations, old top, and 
thanks for the "smokes". 



INTERCEPTED PASSES BRING DEFEAT 

PATRIZIO, LIGHT AND SLACK STAGE UNFRUITFUL 
RALLIES. NEW MEN MAKE FINE 
SHOWING 



Lebanon Valley failed in its attempt 
to get its second successive victory 
when they lost to Springfield College 
20-0 at Springfield last Saturday. In- 
tercepted passes and several long 
runs by Springfield men proved to be 
our undoing. 

White, Springfield quarterback, ac- 
counted for the first touchdown by 
virtue of several large gains he made 
near the close of the first half. Start- 
ing on their own 30-yard line, Spring- 
field advanced to Lebanon Valley's 
12-yard mark from where White 
scored on a lateral pass play. 

Lebanon Valley came right back 
and two forward passes, Reeder to 
Slack and Reeder to S. Light, brought 
two first downs for us and put us in 
Springfield territory. However, the 
whistle ended play before any fur- 
ther damage resulted. 

Lebanon Valley marched right into 
Springfield territory following the 
start of the second half, going down 
to the home team's 30-yard mark with 
an aerial attack. This rally was cut 
short when Thompson, Springfield 
captain, intercepted the next pass. 
For a while neither team gained un- 
til Thompson intercepted a pass the 
second time near midfield. On the 
next play White went around left 
end for a touchdown. 

The final touchdown came when 
Ruscoe intei-cepted a pass on our 28- 
yard line and went on over the goal 
line. 



RAWHOOSER SETS 
REGORDIN MATH 

SCORE IN CARNEGIE 
TEST IS STATE'S 
HIGHEST 



On Tuesday the Registrar received 
the final reports of the results of the 
Carnegie Tests, a series of examina- 
tions in various subjects submitted 
to Sophomores in the majority of the 
colleges and universities throughout 
the United States. The item of 
greateist interest to Lebanon Valley 
was the fact that Mr. Robert Raw- 
houser, a pre'sent Junior, made the 
highest score on the Mathematics 
quiz of anyone in the State. A fairly 
good average in general ability was 
also shown, by these reports to ob- 
tain among last years Sophomores. 

Congratulations are certainly in 
order for Rawhouser. His fellows 
have always recognized in him the 
ability and application that have 
made this honor possible. Lebanon 
Valley may well be grateful for its 
be'stowal. 



Lebanon Valley was able to get 
off on only a few long runs; these be- 
ing contributed by Patrizio, Max 
Light and Slack. Max Light made 
his initial appearance in the game 
■and was one of the stars during the 
time he was in the contest. Stone 
and Abrams also played for the first 
time this year and did well while 
they were in. All of the men who 
made the trip saw action at some 
time during the afternoon. 

Continued on Page 4) 



SCRUBS NOSE OUT 
BECKLEY ELEVEN 

WYKOFF AND KANDRAT 
EXHIBIT VARSITY 
TECHNIQUE 



Lebanon Valley's Reserve football 
squad journedey to Harrisburg last 
Friday afternoon and came home 
with a neat 7-6 victory. A touch- 
down in the last quarter on a pass 
from Wood to Wykoff, and Kandrat's 
beautiful placement kick were the 
plays that did the trick. 

Much credit must be given the 
boys who battled hard throughout 
the game. Having had no practice 
on offensive plays and no actual ex- 
peiiance in games, they put up a fight 
;hat was truly noteworthy. 

Among the highlights of the game 
was the fine kicking of "Pete" Kan- 
drat. With the score tide he dropped 
back and sent a placement kick 
straight over the bars for the extra 
point. That was not his only good 
effort, for on both of Lebanon Val- 
ley's kickoffs he sent the ball back 
to the opponent's goal line with his 
powerful boots. 

Lebanon Valley's touchdown came 
in the last quarter. By consistent 
gaining the ball was pushed deep in 
Beckley's territory. With the ball 
n the 15-yard mark George Wood 
threw a pass to Wykoff who went 
over the goal line for a touchdown. 

Beckley College was fortunate to 
get their touchdown. It came on the 
last play of the first half as the re- 
sult of a pass. Then too, there was 
a doubt whether the pass was beyond 
the end zone, but the referee ruled 
that it was not giving Beckley the 
touchdown. 

With more experience the Re- 
serves wculd undoubtedly have had 
an easier victory. As it was they 
played a fine game throughout while 
the kicking above normal. Wykoff 

Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1930. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, .si n,uitor-in-Chief 

Kutii Liilier, '31 Associate Editor 

K. KouUaUush, '31 . . . . Associate Ji&ltOl' 
K. Morgan, '31 Managing Kditor 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Robert hiuniuuian, '31. 
ALaUelilltj bneuuy, '31 
Rutu tonroyer, 'o2 
Hilda tsucKiey, 32 
Walter KruuiDelgel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Uosnert, oZ Conservatory 

RoOcrt Kawnouser, '32 Atnietio 

JJorotny uarber, '32 ciioiuan 

Mary i^ppiy, '32 Uclyiu 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozeteall 

Fred fiiund, '32 PhiioKosinian 

Eana Lariy, '31 Alumni .Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, 'oi ..business Manager 

P. Reeiie, '32.. Asst. isusniess Manager 

C. \Vise, '31 Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul Am VV. Wallace, imisiish Dept 

Miss Mary K. Wanace, Jiiiisnsn Ueyt. 

L»r. Paul SS. Wagner, matn, Ueyt 



LiA VIE COLLEdENNB, a membei 
of tne intercoiicfei<j.te i\ewspaper asso- 
ciation or tne iviiuuie Atlantic otatcs. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

buo^ciiptioii $1.50 per yeai 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
ofiice as secona class matter unUer tne 
Act oi Marcn 3, io i J. 



SCRUBS 



The success of the Reserves in 
their recent skirmish with Beckiey 
merits our attention. The victory 
confirms what was already a pretty 

general opinion, that there are some 
mighty fine men, and some promis- 
ing football material among the 
scrubs, but the question arises at> 
to how much the contribution wnicn 
theoe men make toward tne succesb 
of tne varsity is appreciated by tneir 
lehows ? 

It is the common tendency of stu- 
dent groups to iorget the scruo ana 
to idolize the hero of a spectacular 
play, but is it fair'/ bnouid no6 
these men be given at least an occa- 
sional word of encouragement": 
Wouid not more frequent oppor- 
tunities of exhibiting tneir aomcy, 
as m Friday's game, inspire them to 
greater achievement, ana compensate 
in some measure for the sacrifice 
made in the interest of the regulars*/ 



LET GEORGE DO IT! 



There is a little statement in the 
annual catalogue of Lebanon Valley 
ooliege which informs us that every 
student is to be limited to participa- 
tion in two of the major extra- 
curricular activities there listed. The 
wisdom of the rule is obvious. But 
we wonder what wouid happen if the 
regulation were "according to the law 
of the Medes and Persians which tl- 
i-ereth not." 

Now here's the point. Under pres- 
ent conditions, if the extra-curricu- 
iar work of the school is to be done, 
there is a small group of students 
who must work like the proverbial 
frojans simply because the larger 
group prefers to lounge, gossip, 
oleep, conduct "bull-sessions" and the 
nke. Some must burn three persons' 
uhare of the midnight oil because 
others are laying down on the job. 

Isn't it about time to quit it? 
Haven't some of us been slackers 
iong enough? Are we such milksops, 
are we so yellow-streaked in the re- 
gion of the spine that we'll let the 
other fellow go out and fight through 
to victory while we stick a share oi 
the glory in our pockets and proudly 
join in Te Deum? 

All the excuses and arguments in 
the world won't change the fact that 
there are some individuals on this 
campus who are being greatly over- 
worked. When Societies call, they 
are there. Anywhere a worker is 
needed you'll find them, silently, effi- 
ciently doing their many tasks. Are 
hey tired of it? Certainly, but they 
must carry on regardless. Do they 
need a rest? Absolutely. Is there a 
hance of their getting one? Not as 
long as the rest of us shrug our 
shoulders and mumble: 
'Let George do it." 




CONCERNING MYSELF 



MORE ABOUT SOCIETIES 



A number of interesting conclus- 
ions are to be drawn from the re- 
ports of the Literary Society presi- 
dents. It appears that all but a 
small fraction of the new girl stu- 
dents have applied for membership 
in one of the two societies for women, 
while only a third of the men have 
applied for entrance to one of the 
two, male organizations. 

It can scarcely fail to strike any- 
one of intelligence, that this situation 
is to be deplored. That the presi- 
dents of Philo and Kalo have done 
their share cannot be questioned. 
Likewise the energy of the other offi- 
cers of these two groups is scarcely 
open to doubt. Just why, therefore, 
the new male students should mani- 
fest so marked a lack of interest is 
rather puzzling. 

This much is perfectly clear: that 
if this lack of interest continues, the 
societies are doomed to pass out, and 
to take with them, too, a wealth of 
tradition that is firmly rooted in the 
past. The plans of the officers for 
a finer type of society work for this 
year must necessarily be hindered. 
Without the support of the incoming 
class, numbers must dwindle, and 
with them must diminish the chances 
for adding variety to programs. 

How about reconsidering the mat- 
ter, men? Would it not be a good 
idea to think it over? 



The next year or two seem to have 
faded into oblivion. Then, when 1 
was at the age of ten or eleven, 
came the eventful day when I was 
preparing fo go to my cousin's 
dancing class. What vague fears 
and hopes filled my breast are hard 
to recall, but I remember living in 
a rose-colored haze for a week be- 
fore. Of course I knew I might 
meet the Fairy Prince, but I com- 
promised on the son of the Presi- 
dent of the United States (that the 
President had no son, mattered not 
at all in my young life). I saw my- 
self at a White House reception, 
receiving ambassadors and royalty 
from all over the world. I could 
imagine myself in a long, black lace 
dress, which trailed along the floor, 
and a tiara of diamonds, waving my 
feather fan back and forth. I prac- 
ticed in front of the mirror in a 
long skirt of the maternal parent, 
md a feather duster. 

When the time came, I was 
slightly disappointed at seeing my 
black lace and high heels turn to a 
short sleeved peach silk, while rib- 
bed sicks and black, flat heeled 
pumps. I was escorted by the par- 
ents, after a hectic hour of hair 
dressing, but now my tangled mop 
was as neat as water and brush could 
make it, and hung about my shoulder 
like eight stiff little sausages. When 
we arrived the families sat along the 
wall watching their little darlings en- 
joying themselves. We bounced 
about like so many wooden puppets* 
I found myself dancing with a fat 
boy with red hair whom I cordially 
detested; and my new pumps pinched 



unbearably. I waited in vain for the 
President's son to appear, my temper 
getting worse all the time, and my 
Imp whispering in my ear. At last 
when I was brought ice cream by 
what seemed to me to be the person- 
ification of all grinning idiots, the 
storm broke. I listened to the 
promptings of my Imp and jogged 
his elbow to make him spill the 
cream down the front of his new 
knickers of which he was so sicken- 
ingly proud. His Guardian Angel 
must have been stronger than mine 
for the plate went hrdling through 
the air and descended in the lap of 
my new dress. My new dress — my 
cherished "evening gown" as I called 
it — ruined, my woe was boundless, 
and I hurled myself with a howl of 
rage at him. My fingers closed on 
his red hair, and I hung on like Grim 
Death, wailing like all lost souls in 
Purgatory. With the howl of a 
banshu he returned the compliment. 
For ten minutes we were the chief 
attraction, until we were pried apart 
by our horrified families. 

Then came the Age of Dramatics, 
in which I played leading parts in 
all the plays which I wrote myself, 
and my cousin and whoever I could 
find played the minor characters. 
Even the dog became the enchanted 
princess, and after playing the good 
fairy godmother, I became the re- 
leased princess. A charge of two 
cents apiece was required, nay de- 
manded, from all members of the 
family, unless bribery was resorted 
to. I became quite rich from the 
quarters I received from the pater- 
nal side to be allowed to stay away. 
All I can say of the rest is: "They 
came; they saw, they suffered." 

But time rolls on and I found my- 
self in high school, past my first pair 
of silk stockings; my high-heeled 
slippers; past my dangling curls, to 
a wobbly "bird's nest" at the back of 
my head, even past that to the heav- 
enly bliss of a short bob; past a fur- 
tive dash of the powder puff to the 
open use of an enameled complexion; 
past the mumps, the measles, the 
whooping cough and all those other 
little blessings; past my first date 
and first real dance and out of high 
school. Of course lessins, those both- 
ersome but necessary evils, I remem- 
ber slightly from the far distant 
past, not being able to forget quite 
all — but that will come in time. Time 
is the cure for all things. 

At last I am in college. A ver- 
dant Freshman to be sure, but still 
in college. Why am I here? At 
present I can tax my brain with such 
a momentous question, so I'll just 
be satisfied with being here. No 
doubt I'll get an inspiration about 
that later on, so until then— why 
worry ? 

Looking backwards though, I ad- 
mit that, although life so far hasn't 
been everything I'd like it to be, I 
certainly would hate "like sin" to 
leave it. Between my rather negli- 
gent Guardian Angel and my ever 
present Imp, I have managed to en- 
joy myself at least. In the future I 
hope my Angel doesn't turn over a 

new leaf and overcome my Imp I 

have too much fun with him even 
though he does get me into trouble 
at times. Any way I like Imps bet- 
ter than Angels! 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Sophomores from Ursinus College 
were routed by police from the Hotel 
Adelphia, Philadelphia, when they 
sought to abduct two Freshmen class 
officers from a dinner dance. When 
the Sophs appeared the Frosh class 
president fled and locked himself in 
a room. The chairman of the dinner 
dance was hidden by classmates. The 
hotel management called in the police 
and soon evicted the Sophs from the 
hotel. 



The Delphian Literary Society pre- 
sented its opening program Friday 
evening, Oct. 17, in Delphian Hall. 
The latter was transformed, for the 
occasion, into a typical Hindu home 
with all its oriental background and 
setting. As friends and visitors were 
ushered into the "Home of Mamba", 
they were greeted with the pungent 
odor of burning incense, and with an 
interesting display of curios, draper- 
ies, rugs and native costumes — all of 
which helped to create a fitting at 
mosphere for the events which fol 
lowed. 

A short oriental play entitled "The 
Home of Mamba", and having its set- 
ting in India, was the outstanding 
feature of the evening's entertain 
ment. Occidental civilization and 
training had lifted the pressure ol 
age-old traditions and customs from 
the shoulders of Leila, the young 
Hindu bride; so she, accompanied by 
her husband, Kreshua, withdrew 
from the bonds of Hindu Cult and 
rejoiced in the sweet companionship 
that English culture had taught her 
But their families, steeped in an- 
cient tradition, fought against their 
own human kindness and natural 
love, and brought about the separa- 
tion of the youthful couple. Kreshua 
was kidnaped and carried off into the 
desert; he finally escaped, and re 
turned in time to find Leila, who had 
become an outcast, slowly dying of a 
broken heart, while her parents look 
ed on, still bound in hardened Stoic 
ism. 

The cast included the following: 
Leila, young Hindu bride — Anne 
Gohn; Kreshua, young Hindu lord 
Caroline Fisher; Mamba, father of 
Leila — Trula Koch; Sarajine, mother 
of Leila — Hilda Buckley; Komari 
dancing-girl — Kathryn Yingst; Na- 
tive women — Ruth Shroyer and Dor- 
othy Thompson; Slave girls — Gladys 
Hershey and Augusta Trochte. 

After the above presentation, the 
"Home of Mamba" was changed into 
a ball-room where slave girls wan- 
dered to and fro serving the guests 
with unusual refreshments which 
were both attractive and appetizing. 
Music, dancing, and much gayety fol- 
lowed, and served as final numbers 
to a very enjoyable program. 



gather about a pleasant fire which 
had been built. There, by the lig^ 
of the fire and many jack-'o-lantern s 
scattered about the nook, the gj r ] s 
busied themselves with songs and the 
delicious refreshments which prov e( j 
delightful after the long hike. Aft er 
all had eaten their fill, the jolly g rou 
of girls made their way back to Ann 
ville. 



CLIOS ENTERTAIN 

FRESHMAN GIRLS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



them their protection. Upon awak- 
ing the children found that darkness 
was coming on, and they were not 
able to discover the path which led 
out of the forest. Presently, an old 
witch, horrid and ugly, appeared and, 
taking a liking to babes, decided to 
lure them to her hovel, fatten them, 
and finally make a delicious meal of 
them. She tempted the young ones 
with promises of candy and ginger- 
bread. In the meantime, their moth- 
er, badly frightened, came in search 
of her children. The old witch en- 
countered her, but denied having 
seen the little ones. Fortunately, the 
queen of the fairies appeared just in 
time to prevent a tragic ending by 
restoring the children to their anx- 
ious parent. 

The characters were: Hansel 

Miriam Silvius; Gretel— Marian May; 
Witch — Kathryn Lutz; Mother — Mar- 
tha Daley; Queen of fairies — Jane 
Muth; Other fairies — Lenora Bender, 
Ann Kiehl, and Dorothy Garber. 

A short distance beyond this spot, 
Clio's President, Mary Stager, repre- 
senting the Spirit of Clio, gave a 
short resume of the four years of a 
college career. She concluded her 
speech with an invitation for all to 




The weather was ideal for the 
game last Saturday. The cold snap 
makes it feel more like football 
weather. 



Quite a few students showed their 
loyalty by making the long trip to 
Springfield. 



George Nye, who was out of the 
last game due to a leg injury, is i n 
good shape again and should see ac- 
tion against the Marines. 



On the other hand Thrush was 
bumped on the leg last Saturday and 
may be kept out of the lineup. 



"Red" Wogan played against one 
of his old schoolmates when he faced 
"Red" Thompson, Springfield cap- 
tain. Both boys played on the same 
team at York High School. 



The game at York tonight should 
draw a large crowd. Although sev- 
eral professional games have already 
been played on the same field, colle- 
giate football should prove enough 
of a drawing card for a full park. 



A great game is expected as the 
Marines will be out to wipe out the 
19-7 defeat they suffered last year 
at Harrisburg. They are reported to 
have an even stronger lineup than 
they presented then. 



Max Light made some nice gains 
in his first appearance on Saturday. 
Keep following in your brother's 
footsteps, Max. 



With three tackles out of the line- 
up, the line may be shifted somewhat. 
Lechthaler has been practising at 
that position this week. In case he 
plays tackle, Klinefelter will most 
llikely play guard while if Lichty 
starts at guard Sprenkle will prob- 
ably get the call at tackle. 



The game with Beckley on Friday 
was played in a shower of rain dur- 
ing most of the contest. 

The Reserve team was composed 
of iron men. They had to be for 
there were only five substitutes avail- 
able for action. 

A few Reserve games each year 
would undoubtedly create more in- 
terest in the game at the local insti- 
tution. More men would be out for 
the squad if they had a chance to get 
in a game or two during the season. 

The "Board of Strategy" at Harris- 
burg was headed by "Bob" Stewart 
who had charge of the team. 



Pennsylvania State College will ob- 
serve its 75th anniversary with a 
three day celebration, Oct. 23-25th 
Speakers at the celebration will in- 
clude Governor Fisher, J. Franklin 
Shields, president of the Board of 
Trustees, and Chas. Z. Klander, col- 
lege architect. Twelve new buildings, 
as well as all old buildings, will be 
open for public inspection. 



Effie M. Hibbs '22 received the de- 
gree of Master of Arts tfrom the 
University of Pennsylvania in June- 



PAGE THREE 





"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Prof. Behney — How did God punish Adam ? 

Bright (?) and eager student — He created Eve — (the dash indicates a 
probable dash for the door.) v 

LVC 



Sonny — Lend me a nickel, will you ? I want to call up a friend. 
Corker — Here's a dime — call up all your friends. 

LVC 



Some motorists seem to make a practice of running down rabbits on 
country roads. Doubtless they have found pedestrians too easy. 

LVC 



Greiner — It's been half an hour since I ordered that turtle soup. 
Mentzer — Well, you know how turtles are. 

LVC 



Bore (relating escape from drowning) — All I was conscious of was a 
great blackness with lurid spots. 

Fallow; Olmbman— H'm! Your past? 

LVC 



Dot — Here's a noted doctah who says that ill health always attacks one'Ss 
weakest spot. 

Caroully (demuh'v)— You do have a lot of headaches, don't you, deah? 
LVC 



A new clerk, while dictating, was in doubt as to the use of a certain 
phrase, so he said to the stenog.: "Do you retire a loan?" and the wistful- 
eyed gum-chewer replied rather sleepily: "No, I sleep with mama." 

LVC 



A tailor had a great desire to hear one of his patrons, a famous tenor, 
Mng. So the tenor gave him tickets for the performance of "Tosca", and 
later asked him how he liked the performance. 

"Oh, it was awful," replied the tailor. 

"Awful, how so?" asked the tenor. 

"Your coat," groaned the tailor, "was too tight under the arms." 
LVC 



Proud Papa — Are there half fares for children ? 

Conductor — Yes, under fourteen. 

P. P.— That's all right. I've only five. 

LVC • 

Teacher— Who can give me a sentence using the word fundamental ? 
Ikey — Mine sister vent out horseback riding and ven she came back she 
ha d to eat "fumdamantel." 

LVC 

Th e following note was found in a parish magazine — "A rummage sale 
**H be held next Saturday in the parish hall. This is a great chance for 
t ^ e ^dies to get rid of anything that is not worth keeping, but too good to 
ow a way. Be there, and bring your husbands." 

fcttr L VC 

"ELIEVE IT OR NOT— 

^ u Ppy love is the beginning of a dog's life. 
The wise husband talks in his wife's sleep, 
tr i/^icago is now investigating the tombstone racket, reputed to be con- 
lied by Al Capone. This is undoubtedly just another branch of the "bier" 

Nobody has ever accused Einstein of plaigarism. 

tm i. otnei * Lebo has joined the F. B. C. P. (fraternity for baby-carriage 
rushers). 

ior Jf_ Van ' ge ^ ne Salario, '34, has expressed a desire to 'try-out' for the Jun- 



Dr. Donald Bishop Prentess, for 
the past six years dean of Lafayette 
College, has been elected president of 
Rose Polytechnic Institute, Terre 
Haute, Indiana. He will assume his 
new duties on February first. 



Wm. B. Wilson, who was Secretary 
of Labor in President Wilson's Cab ; - 
net in 1926, has deserted Hemphill 
and declared his support for Pinchot 
The switching of Republicans and 
Democrats from one party to another 
is proving interesting and exciting 
as election draws nearer. 




Sara Greiner Leffler '24 surved as 
press agent for the Gretna players 
during 1929 ad 1930. 



Secretary of Commerce Lamont is 
acting as chairman of the Job Com- 
mittee recently appointed by Presi- 
dent Hoover to overcome the unem- 
ployment conditions. One of their 
first moves will be to hasten all Fed- 
eral construction work throughout 
the country. 



Wing Commander Charles Kings- 
ford-Smith has shortened the flying 
record between England and Aus- 
tralia by five days. This strenuous 
flight was taken against the doctor's 
orders, since Kingsford-Smith has 
undergone two operations and two 
attacks if influenza recently. 



Before sailing for France Dieu- 
donne Coste and Maurice Bellonte 
were presented with a check for 
$25 ; 000— the prize offered by Wm. E. 
Easterwood, Jr., of Dallas — for ex- 
tending their Paris-New York flight 
to the Texas city. Besides this 
check they also received one for 
twice that amount, the unexpended 
balance of the fund raised by the 
Good-will Flight Committee. 



Another one of the many mar- 
riages of alumni during the summer 
was that of Jerome W. Frock '25 and 
Miss Ethel Hartz '22. Mrs. Frock 
was a teacher in the Hummelstown 
High School, Hummelstown, Pa. and 
Mr. Frock was for several years a 
member of the Annville High School 
Annville, Pa. 

Rav. Meyer M. Hostetter '25, ia 
pastor of the Faggs Manor Presby- 
terian Church near West Chester 
which held a four day program in 
celebration of the two hundredth an- 
niversary of its founding. The cele- 
bration which was held from Aug- 
ust 28-31 included a pageant depict 
ing the colonization of the Americas 
by the Scotch and the subsequent 
founding of the Faggs Manor Church. 



Herbert Hoover, Jr., who has been 
under treatment for tuberculosis at 
the President's camp on the Rapidan 
River in Virginia, will spend the win- 
ter on South Mountain, near Ashe- 
ville, N. C, where he has leased some 
property. His wife will accompany 
him but his three children will re- 
main in California. 



The Brazilian government has sent 
out part of the battle fleet to combat 
the rebellion. Government troops are 
also moving slowly toward the affect- 
dered all banks closed to avoid soec- 
ed areas. The government has or- 
ulations and has taken over contro 1 
of all food supplies, fearing a short 
age of food. 



He has learned what a 



Play. 

q Ua< j^^ man is qertainly profiting by his French 
Th 1S " 

by . rea son "we" speak of "ourselves" as "we" is that "we" believe that 
^hich n ^ ^ e ™P ress * on °f plurality "we" are safer from bodily harm, 
\ Q » migftt De administered by those who do not like "our" column, than 
should be otherwise. 

^ Urn iture dealer in Chicago displays this sign — "You marry the girl, 

a ^ay rnis ^ the home." A dealer in second hand furniture, a few doors 

f,' n °} to De outdone has this sign— "You furnish the divorce, we'll buy 
AU *natutr0." 



When Lieutenant Commander Dun 
can, of the Navy's Bureau of Aero 
nautics, on a flight from Hartford. 
Conn, to Boundbrook, N. J., passed 
over Manhatten he lost his bearings, 
due to considerable haze. He turned 
his radio compass on station WJZ 
and was able to find his way safely 
to Boundbrook. "Blind flying" nav- 
igation by this method is now being 
studied. 



The forthcoming Pennsylvania e- 
lection will prove interesting since 
each day is seeing more Republicans 
declairing their support in favor of 
the new Democratic-Liberal candi- 
date. So far W. W. Atterbery, head 
of the P. R. R., Wm. S. Vare. and 
forty-seven out of forty-eight of the 
Republican City Commission of Phil- 
adelphia have all withdrawn their 
support from the Republican ticket 
in favor of Hemphill, the Democratic 
Liberal candidate. 



Alta Bortz, '22 and Dorcas Bortz, 
'26, spent the summer months in 
Paris where they studied at L'Al 
liance Francaise. 



Rev. Harry E. Schaeffer '17, pastor 
of the Penbrook United Brethren 
church, returned in August from a 
tour of the Holy Lands. 



Mary Clymer '27 is teaching Eng- 
lish in the Henry Houck Junior High 
School, Lebanon. 



Mae Reeves Rhoads '23 died at 
her home in Jamestown, New York, 
on August 26. Funeral services, in 
charge of Dr. G. D. Gossard, were 
held from the home of her parents in 
Highspire, followed by interment in 
the Highspire cemetery. Before her 
marriage to John G. Rhoads in De- 
cember 1928, Mrs. Rhoads taught in 
the high schools at Lehighton and 
Pitman, New Jersey. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Gordon Starr an- 
nounced, recently, the birth of a 
daughter at the Lancasater Hospital. 
Mr. Starr is a graduate of L. V. in 
the class of '27 and is a teacher and 
coach in the Annville High School. 
Mrs. Starr was Marion Hess '26. She 
too was a teacher of Latin in the 
Annville High School. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1930. 



GELBERT WEDDING 

OF SPECIAL NOTE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



of Ephrata; Paul Piersol, of Coates- 
ville; E. E. Mylin, of Annville, and 
Robert Atkinson, of Trenton, N. J. 

Immediately after the ceremony, a 
reception, attended by the immediate 
families and close friends, was held 
at the Washington Inn, Valley 
Forge. 

The newly-weds left on a trip 
which will include a tour of New 
York State, Maine and Canada. They 
will arrive in St. Louis, November 1 ; 
where they will be at home in Forest 
Park Hotel. 

Mrs. Gelbert is a daughter of Mrs. 
Ruth E. Hafer, of 225 Lincoln Way 
West, Chambersburg and the late R 
0. Hafer. She is a graduate of the 
Chambersburg High School, class of 
1924 and of Lebanon Valley College 
class of 1928. After her graduation 
from college, Mrs. Gelbert taught in 
the Manor Township High School for 
Millersville for one year. 

The groom is a son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles P. Gelbert of Garder. 
street, Ambler, Pa. Since his grad- 
uation from college in 1929, he has 
been affiliated with the St. Louir 
Cardinals. He has made a name foi 
himself the past season in the 
World Series as a spectacular short- 
stop for St. Louis. 

The wedding is of special interest 
to the students at Lebanon Valley 
Many remember "Jerrie" Hafer ar 
she was familiarly called by her 
friends and associates. As for 
Charlie, there is scarcely a student 
at the school, especially the young 
men, who, even though he does no' 
know him personally, does not know 
of him. The World Series was par- 
ticularly important the past few 
weeks for Gelbert played a great 
game for the Cardinals. He made 
quite an enviable record while here 
in school, being a three-letter varsity 
man. Such an athlete as he will 
never be forgotten. 

Among the many guests at the 
wedding were, Madame Green, dean 
pf women, Prof, and Mrs. Wallace 
Prof, and Mrs. Reynolds, Miss Fen- 
sil and E. E. Mylin, the athletic 
coach under whom Gelbert was de- 
veloped. 

The LA VIE joins with the rest of 
the student body in wishing the 
greatest happiness to the bride anc 
groom for the future. 



Practically all of these men have 
seen service on debating teams be- 
fore, either, in high school or an last 
year's varsity at L. V. C. A success- 
ful season seems assured. 



SCRUBS NOSE OUT 

BECKLEY ELEVEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



MEN ORGANIZE 

FOR DEBATING 



handled the punting and in the first 
nail tie got Uie Oail out ior our terri- 
tory witn nice punts. 
L. V. KEoEiiVJiiS BECKLEY 
rvarinch L. E. Fetterman 

ivunurat L. T. Kaemovitcii 

nugnes L. G. Randis 

rrey (Capt.) C. Steiger 
.orown R. G. Brassing ton 

oparks R. T. \ventz, 

anaiier R. E. Manaio 

vvykort* Q. B. Menges 

iiuwers H. B. \versn 

iienne H. B. Masciatomo 

Wood F. B. Bann 

JL. V. Reserves 7 — < 

Beckiey — . 6 0—6 

buDstitutions — L. V.: Kohler for 
carmen, .bisnburn for Brown, Brown 
xor Fishburn, Boyer for Sparks, 
^parks tor .boyer, ±»oyer tor Hugnes. 



for Heller, Sprenkle for Bartolet, 
Murphy for Wogan, Slack for M. 
Light, Reeder for Daub, Feeser for 
Reeder, Stone for Feeser, Abrams 
for S. Light. 

Referee — H. A. Swaffield, Brown. 
Umpire — J. E. Barry, Bowdoin 
Linesman — J. H. Ward, Boston Col- 
lege. 



Y. W. NOTES 



VARSITY LOSES TO SPRING- 
FIELD; RESERVES WIN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Line-up: 
L. V. C. 
Heller 
Kelly 

Klinefelter 

vVogan 

iiechthaler 

Bartolet 

xhrush 

r'atrizio 

ivf. Light 

jJaub 

3. Light 



SPRINGFIELD 

R. E. Blumenstock 

R. T. Geesman 

R. G. Peterson 

C. Thompson 

L .G. Fowler 

L. T. Rae 

L. E. Wilson 

Q. B. Johnson 

H. B. Knowlton 

H. B. Owl 

F. B. Simonson 



Lebaon Valley 0—0 

Springfield 7 6 7—20 

Touchdowns — White 2, Ruscoe. 
Points after touchdowns — White 2, 
placement kicks. 

Substitutions — Lebanon Valley: 
vVilliams for Thrush, Wood for 
Klinefelter, Volkin for Kelly, Orsino 



A short but interesting "Friendly 
Hour" service was held Sunday 
evening, Oct. 19, in North Hall par- 
lar, with Naomi Shively as leader. 
Mary K. Goshert played "A Prelude" 
by Mendelssohn in her usual skillful 
manner. The devotions were in 
charge of Ruth Shroyer and were 
based on John 8:1-19. "Life at Its 
Best", a magazine article, written by 
Bruce Curry for the Intercollegian, 
was reviewed by Dorothy Garber in 
an interesting and helpful manner. 
After the singing of several hymns 
the meeting was brought to a close. 



Dr. H. H. Shenk '00, Lucille Shenk 
'23 and Esther Shenk '26 spent sev- 
eral weeks in Ottawa, Canada, do- 
ing special research work among the 
Canadian archies. 



H. GOODMAN & SONS 

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CLOTHING OF QUALITY 



J. S. BASHORE 



Lebanon, Pa. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



trizio, a Senior and not a candidate 
for the team, should act as manager 
This will leave the debaters free tc 
concentrate on the preparation oi 
speeches. 

The twelve men present were ther 
divided into six pairs, each pair to 
constitute one of the teams to en 
gage in the three preliminary de- 
bates. These debates will embrace 
the three questions submitted, and 
will be held in the near future. Thej 
will be open to the student body. 

Lots were finally drawn for ques- 
tions and sides. The results were ai 
follows: 

Question 1 — Affirmative, Umber 
and Women; Negative, Heilman and 
Shellenberger. 

Question 2 — Affirmative, Hallman 
and Mariano; Negative, Mentzer and 
Goudie. 

Question 3 — Affirmative, Etter and 
H. Mariano; Negative, Schell and 
Evancoe. 



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SNAP 
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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



STAR COURGTi) 
WEDNESDAY, NO 7. 5 
DON'T MISS IT. 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1930. 



No. 5. 



Quantico Marines Trounce Local Gridmen 

LINE CRUMBLES AFTER FIRST HALF " ~ 



BULL-DOGS SCORE EARLY IN GAME THROUGH BLOCKV 
ED PUNT. L. V'S DEFENSE OF GOAL 
LINE SPECTACULAR 



Lebanon Valley's team made a fine 
battle against the heavier and 
stronger U. S. Marine football team 
last Friday night in a game under 
artificial lighting at Eagle Park, 
York, the Marines winning by a 7-0 
score. More than a thousand fans 
braved the cold weather to see Leba- 
non Valley's first game under the 
lights. 

A blocked punt late in the first 
quarter paved the way for the Ma- 
rines to score a touchdown shortly 
after the start of the second period 
and thus gain their margin of vic- 
tory. With the ball on our 20-yard 
line and third down, Daub dropped 
back to kick, 'but Cummings, husky 
right tackle for the Marines broke 
through and blocked the boot. He 
downed the ball on Lebanon Valley's 
nine-yard line. 

Two line bucks advanced the ball 
to the five-yard line as the first pe- 
riod cr ded. A lire buck at the str.rt 
of the second quarter gained a scant 



FACULTYiHOLDS 
SPECIAL BANQUET 

DR. LEARNERD SPEAKS 
ON FRESHMEN 
PROBLEMS 



The faculty held a banquet at 
Chefs Place for the reception of Dr. 
Learnerd on education from Michi* ( 
gan who is connected with the Car- 
negie Foundation for the Avjance- 
ttent of Teaching. It was held on 
Tuesday evening October 28th. 

The topic upon which Dr. Lear- 
ner d spoke was concerning the advis- 
ability of having advisors for Fresh- 
me *i in college, from the stand-point 
of their adaptability. The speaker 
lightened he's subject by slides 
showing th e mental scope of certain 
^dividual s and the comparison of 
standardized with subjective tests, 
ttvtelligjericg and the effect which hab- 
^ has upon them during their pre- 
colleg e years. Children are endowed 
ne Pointed out with certain natural 
ln stincts which if followed produce 
a splendid result whereas the effect 
w °uld have been less commendable 
forced courses were followed, or 
c °ercion used. 

The general opinion of the faculty 
^ as decideally favorable. It was a 
en eficial as well as enjoyable talk, 
m ade by a speaker whose opinions 
* er e valuable to teachers and pro- 
. es sors who are actually interested 
ln the welfare and success of their 
stu <lents. 



yard, but then McCaffery dropped 
back and tossed a neat pass to 
Poppleman, who caught the ball over 
the goal line. McCaffery made a drop 
kick for the extra point. 

From then on until the end of the 
half the play surged between the 20- 
yard marks. Lebanon Valley at- 
temped quite a few passes but failed 
to complete any. Glick, big right 
end, broke in repeatedly to hurry the 
passer and cause the passes to be 
wild. 

In the second half, the Marine's 
Continued on Page 4) 



STUDENTS HEAR 
CHICAGO CHEMIST 

ANIMATED DISCUSSION 
OF SCIENTIFIC LIFE 
CONTROL 



On Tuesday morning, Dr. H. I. 
Jones, an industrial chemist of Chi- 
cago, delivered a remarkably inter- 
esting lecture on the Scientific Meth- 
od of Controlling Life, during the 
regular chapel period. Dr. Jones 
was secured under the auspices of the 
Star Course Committee. 

A remarkable fund of scientific 
knowledge was united, in Dr. Jones, 
with a remarkable capacity for hum 
or. He explained in an intensely in- 
teresting manner the functions of the 
various glands of the human body, 
and showed how life is a chemical 
process and is always chemicalh 
controlled. He further pointed out 
the necessity of possessing a balanced 
personality, as opposed to a one -sid- 
ed, espicially a so-called materialistic 
nature. 

Dr. Jones cited numerous exam- 
ples from his own experience, espec- 
ially emphasizing the fact that he 
was himself born a weakling and 
grew to healthy manhood only 
through the application of the laws 
of control of which he spoke. He 
then explained these laws, showed 
how they might be applied, and gave 
illustrations to prove their effective- 
ness. His entire treatment of this 
subject was intensely practical. 

Dr. Jones dealt most expertly with 
funtions of the subconscious mind. 
He pointed out how it can become a 
most effective egent of control, lead 
ing either to the success or failure 
of the individual, according as it is 
mastered. 

The students manisfested a remark- 
able interest in the lecture and were 
unanimous in their praise. The feel- 
ing was general that the Star Course 
Committee deserves considerab'e 
credit this year for the type of speak- 
ers is has been able to secure for 
such occasions. 



READER'S CLUB HOLDS 
BI-MONTHLY MEETING 



The Reader's Club held their bi- 
monthly meeting at the home of Dr. 
Wallace last Monday night. Eugene 
O'Neil was the topic of the evening. 
The first number on the program was 
a story of his life told by Miss Ruth 
Shroyer. The next report was on his 
play "Anna Christie" which Mr. Rus- 
sell Morgan handled very welh Fol- 
lowing Mr. Morgan, Miss Ethel May 
Hower rendered a snyopsis of "Em- 
peror Jones". Then Miss Elizabeth 
Lefevre reported on "All God's Chil- 
ian Got Wings." After the reports 
there was a general discussion on 
Eugene O'NeiPs play "Strange In- 
terlude" which the club had seen in 
Lancaster two weeks ago. It was 
this discussion that probably made 
this the best meeting which the club 
had ever held due to the personal 
interest aroused by the play. 

Following the discussion on O'Nei; 
and his works Mr. Paul Evancoe gave 
a resume on The New Humanism. 



SECOND NUMBER 
OF STAR COURSE 

"HER HUSBAND'S WIFE" 
TO BE ABLY 
PRESENTED 



Wednesday, November the fifth, 
marks the appearance of the second 
Star Course number, the play, "Her 
puslbands Wife." 

The resume of the play. A young- 
wife of pessemestic tendiencies, who 
'constantly taking remedies for 
imaginary ills and believes she is go- 
ing to die, decides to pick out her 
husband's wife. Naturally she selects 
the plainest and "doudest" person sir. 
can find hitting upon a spinster who 
consents to be the "successor." 

But when the "successor" learns 
why she has been chosen all her re- 
sentment is aroused. She begins to 
"fix up" and really makes herself at- 
tractive that the husband becomes 
interested and the wife begins to re- 
gret her bargain. 

The wife sets to work to undo 
what she has done. She tells the 
"successor" all manners of stories 
about the husband — that he is a wife 
beater, a brute, and all that. Of course 
the successor goes to the husband 
with this story and he, a kind loving, 
and consederate man, is so upset that 
he proceeds to "drown his troubles." 

As usual, all is cleared up at the 
end. The wife decides she is not go- 
ing to die, after all, and things are 
brought to a happy conculsion. 

These attractions are brought to 
Lebanon Valley by the Star Course 
Committee primarily for the benefi 1 
of the students. It is therefore 
imperative that the students support 
the project. Don't forget the time 
and date, Wednesday, Nov. 5 in the 
Engle Conservatory. 



JUNIORS SELECT 
CAST FOR PLAY 



SHAWS "PYGMALION" IS 
CHOISE OF JR. 
PLAYERS 



The Junior Class has selected foi 
presentation on December lOch Ber- 
naru Shaw's "Pygmalion," a modern 
comedy in five acts. Tnis play has 
been given very successfully in Eur- 
ope, England, and America. It is 
a play that is intensely and deliber- 
ately didactic. 

The analogy of the story is better 
understood if we recall that Pygma- 
lion was a sculptor of Cyprus whc 
fell in love with his statue, Galatea, 
to which Venus gave life. So in thit 
model n comedy, Henry Higgins, 
professor of Phonetics, takes Eliza 
Doolittle, a iiower girl who is little 
more than a gutter-snipe, from the 
streets of London and m six months:, 
time creates cut of her a lady whom, 
as hes aid, he could present to the 
King at Buckingham Palace and whc 
would not be able to detect her for- 
mer dialect in her speech. 

The part of the flower girl will be 
played by Eva L. Peck. Miss Pecks 
ability and interpretations are weL 
known, for she has taken quite an 
active part in dramatics here at L 
V. C. Some of the productions she 
has taken part in are The Dolls 
House, The Truth, Thursday Even- 
ing, and Seven Keys to Baldpate. 

Professor Henry Higgins will be 
portrayed by Paul K. Keene. Mr. 
Keene, it will be remembered, played 
in St. Joan, which was give two year? 
ago by Philo under Dr. Wallace's 
coaching. 

The others who are taking part: 
in Pymalion are: 

Colonel Pickering — James H. Leathen 
Mrs. Higgins, Henry's mother — Ann 

Augusta Esbenshade. 
Mrs. Pearce, housekeeper — Eulalie 

Morton 

Mr. Doolittle, Eliza's father — John 
Morris. 

Mrs. Eynsford Hill— M. Elizabeth 
Engle. 

Miss Cara Hill— Cynthia Benzing. 
Parlor maid — Mary Ann Rupp. 

The part of Frederick Hill has not 
been decided upon as yet. 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace is coach- 
ing the play and has already begun 
rehearsals. 



GERMAN CLUB PLANS TO 
GIVE PLAY IN GERxvi^N 



It is with deep regret that we 
announce the death of Warren 
Harmon Lebo, the infant son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Warren Lebo. La 
Vie speaks for the student 
body in extending its most sin- 
cere sympathy to the pr.rcnts. 



The German Club has become es- 
tablished as a part of Lebanon Val- 
ley. When it was organized every- 
thing was future and theortical. It 
now has passed the stage where all 
is hope and plan. Things are begin- 
ning to take place as one hope after 
another is realized. 

The greatest thing the club now 
has in view is the presentation of a 
Christmas play. All dialogue is in 
the German language, all costumes 
follow German trends, all references 
are to German church practeces. The 
play is the traditional scene of the 
Nativity. 

The truly German atmosphere it 
created through the introduction oJ 
the inn-keeper and his wife. German 
is the land which produces a people 
who maintain inns, not as scenes of 
revelry, but as means for social com- 
munication. And so in this Wein- 
acpstspeile we personally meet the 
inn-keeper, instead of merely hearing 
his name. 

The German Club realize that the 
play, since it is in the foreign lan- 
guage, may be unintelligible to soma. 
And yet, since every one knows the 
story of the birth of Christ, the or- 
ganization feels that merely the vis- 
ual presetation of the play will be 
both entertaining and educational. 

The cast has been selected; work 
on it shall begin immediately. Dr. 
Lietzan is keenly interested in the 
work. She shall personally supervise 
the work. It is interesting to note 
that she has herself acted in the 
presentation of this same play, and 
therefore, the club is booking for 
great things from her efforts. Whether 
or not you understand German, your 
support is sollicited. 



LIBRARIANS MEET 
IN CONFERENCE 



MANY STUDENTS AND 
FACULTY MEMBERS 
ATTEND 



The Pennsylvania Library Asso- 
ciation held its 30th Annual Meeting 
last week from October 21-24 at the 
Galen Hall Hotel in Wernersville. 

The program of activities was a ; 
follows: Tuesday, October 21 Presi- 
dent's address by A. Coleman Sheetz, 
Library Executive, Pennsylvania State 
Library, Hardisburg Pa.. Report of 
representative to the American Li- 
brary Association at Los Angeles, 
California by Dr. Frederich A. God- 
eharles, Director of State Library and 
Museum, Harrisburg, Pa. Wednesdav, 
October 22. Business meeting and 
Book review Prize Contest and talk- 
on childrens' Libraries. Action of An- 
tographes Books of famous Amerisa-i 
authors and an address by Stuart 
P. Chase economist and au'hor. 
Thursday. October 23. A short bus- 
iness meeting, Book talk — poetry for 
Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1930. 



Jfa Bit &&llt$imnt 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Btter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

RE PORT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Madeline Sheddy, '31 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per .year 

Entered «.t the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tlie 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



DEMOCRACY 



The present political situation ir, 
Pennsylvania offers a strange com- 
mentany upon this institution which, 
in theory, we so proudly uphold undei 
the name of Democracy. Rival can- 
didates hurling threats and accusa- 
tions at each oth e r, reams of cam 
paign literature, innumerable pages, 
of political advertisements and parti- 
son editorials, thousands of cubic 
feet of campaign "gas", including 
easily forgotten promises — was this 
what our forfathers had in mind 
when they fought for democracy? 

Well, perhaps not. And yet, then 
own political slate was none to clean." 
Ballot-box stuffing in one form oi 
another, and all kinds of corruption 
have existed time out of mind. Will 
they continue to exist? Certainly, as 
long as human nature is human na- 
ture. But they could be reduced con- 
siderably without causing a great 
deal of pain to the public. 



FREEDOM OF THE PRESS 



truth, teh best remedy is the one 
suggested by the homely but timely 
oxiom: 

"Give the calf enough rope and he'll 
soon hang himself." 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



SOCIETIES PLEDGE 

THEIR NEW MEMBERS 



MY DAD 



My Dad is one of those chubby, 
jolly looking men whom everyone 
nkes. He is about five feet six in- 
ches tali, with black hair, brown eyes, 
a turneu up nose, and a ruddy lace, 
liis clothes are usually dark and in- 
conspicious but are nevertneless al- 
ways in good conuiuon. He scarcely 
ever wears a hat and never a cap. 
His appearance at all times must be 
good, because of his contact with 
people in the bank. 

One of his most predomenint char-l 
acteristics is that of thinking before 
ne speaks. He ;s a man of lew 
words, one to whom I would not be 
afraid to trust secrets, and who can 
Keep quiet about the good turns he 
does for others. He has a keen sense 
of humor, but nevertheless can be 
stein and serious if the case demands 
these characteristics. He is very 
much interested in the welfare of 
church, the school and the town. 

Working in the bank, he cohes in 
contact with so many people that he 
is often glad to get away where 
there are fewer people — in the coun- 
try, on picnic, hikes, or merely at 
home. However, he beongs to quite 
a few clubs and lodges and often en- 
joys an evening in association with 
the fellowmembers of these frater- 
nities. He spends a great deal of 
time listening to radio programs, 
reading newspapers and magazines 
(especially Time) anl playing golf. 

On the whole, I think he is the best 
sport, the best pal, and the best Dad 
that a girl could have. 

Kathryn L. Witmer 



CHEMISTRY CLUB HOLDS 
ITS INITIAL MEETING 



Among the liberties to which A- 
mericans cling so tenaciously is that 
of the freedom of the press. Only 
under the most stringent circum- 
stances will they permit this right to 
be in any way abridged. But w e 
sometimes wonder if our editors can 
always distinguish between liberty 
and license? 

No one who is familiar with the 
events of the last few w e eks can fail 
to be distinctly surprised at the un- 
fair and downright libellious reports 
published in the newspapers. It seems 
to be the delight of little minds these 
days to belittle in every manner the 
^students in our collegiate institu- 
tions. It is now taken for granted 
that as soon as a young man steps 
across the threshold of a college he 
becomes a ruffian, a brutal savage, 
or something of the kind. But when 
the daily press takes up the strain 
of the tabloids and the cheap movie 
we feel like drastic measures might 
not be entirely out of order. 

More responsible than the edition, 
however, are the unmanly cowards_, 
the "squealers" who furnished the 
information on which these libellious 
fabrication were founded. We used 
say no more that that such spineless 
specimens of the male sex certainly 
do not deserve the honor of being 
numbered among the men of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

That recourse to law is available 
in such cases we know. We also are 
well aware that such measures ag- 
gravate rather than alleviate the 
situation. When men lose ther sense 
of honor, and the agents of the pub- 
lic press their pride in upholding the 



The Chemistry Club held its first 
meeting last Thursday evening, fea- 
turing on the program three of the 
most important phases of modern 
Chemistry. 

Following a short business meet- 
ing conducted by President Morgan., 
the Speakers presented their mater- 
ial. In the business meeting it was 
decided that the meetings of the Chem- 
istry Club were to be open to every 
student on the campus, those present 
being enrolled at that time. 

Wittle, the first speaker of the 
evening, gave an interesting survey 
of the Magnesium Industry and it? 
chief alloy, Dow Metal. He accom- 
panied his talk with specimens illus- 
trating the process from the refin- 
ing of the raw material to the pro- 
duction of the finished product. Kuh- 
nert, the next speaker, enlightened 
the group on the medicinal use of 
Arsenious Oxide. His speech proved 
to be entertaining as well as instruc- 
tive. Hemperly concluded the for-, 
mal program with a most animated 
talk concerning the special extrac- 
tion of cobalt ores. Hemperly also 
accompanied his talk with a series 
of specimens illustrating the products 
of this method of extraction, all of 
which he dexterously drew from his 
pockets as he spoke. The speech was 
a resume of his own personal exper- 
ience obtained while working in a 
Chemistry Laboratory during the 
past summer. 

Dr. Bender commended the speak- 
ers on their excellent performance 
and expressed his de< ;re that future 
meetings be made cs interesting and 
instructive as was this, the first by 
permitting each one in the club to 
stand before it and demonstrate his 
own lecture. The meeting was then 
adj. aimed. 



Following the regular morning 
chapel services of last luesday so- 
ciety pledge cards were issued to tne 
new students. The incoming giria 
showed a splendid spirit uy naving 
an almost 100 % enrollment, line boys 
nowever, were quite slow in making 
up their nunds and the response was 
comparatively halt-hear tta. Lets 
spruce up, fellows! 

The results: 
[DELPHIAN 

Helen Lane, Regina Oifer, Leona 
Allen, Sadie Light, Mary Gossard, 
Mary Brace, Edna Williams, Gem 
Gemmil, Dorothy Ely, Thelma bhoop, 
Esther Smelser, Ruth Mark, Majorie 
Miller, Helda Heller, Evangeline Sa- 
lorio, Margaret Lehn, Winifred Mil- 
ler, Mina Wolfskeil, Dorothy Jack- 
son, Katherine E&ly, Verna Gres- 
singer, Kathryn Mourey. 
KALO 

George Klitch, Robert Hughes, Paul 
Dumler, George Snowbill, Arnold 
Pifilen, Edgar Schanbacker, Gerald 
White, George Sherk, Peter Kandrat, 
Andrew Schwartz, Leonard Volkin, 
Marvin Adams, Jack Todd, Fred Leh- 
man, Floyd Mantz, Earl Hoover, El- 
vin Fake, William Seeger, Allen Buz- 
zell, Daniel Engle, Leroy Miller, 
William Mathias. 

CLIO PLEDGES 

Haidee Blubaugh, Mildred Bomber- 
ger, Matilda Bonanni, Miriam Book, 
Emily Brandt, Emma Fasnacht, Mary 
Groff, Christine Gruber, Catherine 
Heckman, Martha Kreider, Anna 
Krebs, Margaret Kohler, Kathryn 
Light, Margaret Longenecker, Mar- 
ian Miller, Anne Matula, Mildred 
Nye, Miriam Owen, Gertrude Paul, 
Bernice Raimon, Elizabeth Schaak, 
Virginia Thrush, Charlotte Weirick, 
Kathryn Louise Witmer, Helen Eddy, 
Dorothy, Haldeman, Miriam Holland, 
Kathryn Krebs. 
PHILO 

Allen Rank, Wewitt Essick, Mit- 
chell Jordan, John Zeck, Me.vin 
Sponsler, Donald Shope, Dwight 
Grove, Keeneth Whisler, Earl How- 
ard. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Quite a crowd went down to Lan- 
caster with the Reader"s Club to see 
Eugene O'Neils play, "The Strange 
Interlude." It was quite interesting 
to see the various reactions. Some 
went to be shocked, some were shocked 
and some couldn't be shocked. 



"And have you heard about the 
Sophomore girl who thought the 
pointer of her microscope was a 
crack in th e glass? For details see 
Moose Morgan. 



Jim Montieth told us a few 'good 
ones' about Becker and Kleinfelter 
but as some of the fair sex are in- 
volved we deem it best to say no 
more. 



Of course you've hear about the 
female who thought that Babe Ruth 
was a chorus girl. Well somebody 
evidently thought that Babe Early 
was a Co-ed as he received a tele- 
phone call in North Hall. 



so as to make it a trianglar affai: 



Though we all wept at the parting 
of the twenty-five there were none 
of course who wept with such bitter- 
ness as the fair lassies. But why 
weep pretty maidens? There still re- 
main many good men and true. 



And some shots out of the waste 
basket for the aesthetes. Many stu- 
dents committed sucide after read- 
ing "The Sorrows of Werther" by 
Goethe G. Flaubert showed symp- 
toms of arsenic poisoning after he 
had finished writing of Madame Bov- 
ary's death by arsenic poisoning. Java 
Head, by Joseph Hergesheimer is cne 
of the best American Novels. E- 
nough! 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Czar Boris III of Bulgaria and 
Princess Giovanni of Italy were mar- 
ried in the church of St. Francis of 
Assisi, Oct. 25th, while a tempestuous 
hail and rainstorm raged outside. 
They will take a honeymoon trip on 
the royal yacht through the Adriatic 
Ionian, Aegean, and Black Seas to 
Bulgaria. When they reach Bulgaria 
King Boris will have his long deferred 
coronation, and Princess Giovanna, at 
22, will become the Queen of Bulgaria. 
36 months construction job, but has 
actually been completed in 29 months. 
Actual cost was also 10% less than 
that provided for in the contract. 



The Junto Government has now es- 
tablished itself in Brazil. Former 
Presirdent Washington Luis harmed 
over the government on Oct. 26 tn to 
the Junto government and was treat- 
ed with all regard due to his high of- 
fice. The cabinet ministers have re- 
signed. The movement was accom- 
plished witnout bloodshed and With 
all order and respect to the deposeu 
authorities. The provisional govern- 
ment plans immediate reconeilatiui. 
of the Brazilian family, maintenance 
of nationfd pledges, and pacification 
of minds within the country. 

The main object of the revolution 
has been accomplished. President 
Washington Luis has been deposed 
and President-elect Julio Prestes win 
not be inaugurated on Nov. 15th. 



Germany's second coal-mine disas- 
ter within a week was thought to 
have killed about 100 miners in the 
workings of the Mayback mine at 
Quierschite, heart of the Saar Valley 
coal region. The other disaster was 
at the Alsdorf mine, in which 26* 
miners were killed. 



A hint to the Frosh Co-eds. Beware 
the Ides of November. 



There seems to be quite a rivalry 
between the Jersey Club (Fencil's) 
and Varsity Hall( Bolton's). It hap- 
pened in this manner. The boys ir 
Varsity Hall challenged the members 
of the Jersey Club to a basketball 
tournament and the latter outfit re- 
taliated by challengeing the members 
of Varsity Hall to a stiff rubber of 
Bridge. Perhaps the Dorm can dig 
up a bnsketbr.il and a Bridge team 



Jane Addams, founder of Huh 
House, Chicago, and Frank B. Kel- 
logg, new American member of the 
Permanent Court of International 
Justice at the Hague, have been pro- 
posed for the two Nobel peace prizes, 
which are to be awarded Dec. 10th. 
Miss Addams backers urged her name 
on the strength of her world wide 
efforts to promote peaceable settle- 
ments of international disputes. Mr. 
Kellogg sponsors claim he is a fit 
recipient of the award because of his 
part in framing the Kellogg pact, 
under which more than fifty nations 
have renounced war as an instrument 
of national policy. 




Cyrus E. Woods has resigned as 
Attorney General of Pennsylvania, 
and Governor Fisher has appointed 
Wm. A. Schnader, of Philadelphia, as 
his successor. The change in duties 
will take place Nov. 1st. Mr. Woods 
declared there was no political mo- 
tive behind his resignation. He and 
Mrs. Woods are sailing for Europe. It 
is said Mrs. Woods is in poor health. 



What a gang of men the Marin 
turned out to be! Our fellows 
like pigmies beside of som e of thern 

The visibility under the artifici 
lighting was all right. The objecti 
to night football isn't the illuming 
tion but the cold of autumn nights 

There were fumbles galore mad e b 
both sides in the contest. The v ^ 
son most likely was frozen fingers " 

The Marine game witnessed the 
complete cobpse, for the first time 
of our passing attack. 



One encouraging factor of the gam e 
was the form shown by Max Light 
He continued the good work he start- 
ed in the Springfield game both on 
the offense and the defense. 



M. Light and Daub had the longest 
gains, each spinning off a run of 
about ten yards. 



"Bernie" Thrush has been walking 
around an crutches this week due to 
blood poisoning in his right leg. Ther e 
is the probability that he will be out 
of the lineup for the remainder of the 
season. 



Pat«*iz'p's .shoulder is coming a- 
round allr ight and Pat will most 
likely be calling the signals against 
Mt. St. Mary's. 



The last two games with Mt. St. 
Mary's have both been ties.- Neither 
team has crossed the other's goal 
line in the past two years. 



Mt. St. Mary's record this year 
contains two victories and two de- 
feats. The victories are over St Vin- 
cent and Baltimore U. while the de- 
feats came from Albright and St. 
Thomas. 



Washington U., our opponent after 
Mt. St. Mary's, scored a 27-6 victory 
over Dickinson, Juniata lost 12-14 to 
Waynesburg, and Albright, our 
Thanksgiving foe, trounced P. M. C. 
42-7 last Saturday. 



Quite a few L. V. fellows watched 
Bucknell beat Gettysburg 26-6 last 
Saturday at Gettysburg, halting the 
latter's streak of victories. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, Oct. 30— Faculty 

Banquet at Chefs. 
Friday, Oct. 31— Y. M. C. A. 

and Y. W. C. A. 
Saturday, Oct. 1— Y. M. C. A. 

and Y. W. C. A. Hallow'een j 

Party. 

Sunday, Nov. 2— Fri e ndly Hr. 
at 5:45. 

Tuesday, Nov. 4 — Prayer Meet- . 

ing in Chapel 
Wednesday, Nov. 5— Second 

Star Course Number. A Three j 

Act Play "Her Husband's j 

Wife. 



EXCHANGES WILL BE 

ON FILE IN LIBRARY 



On account of the rising interes^ 
in intercollegiate affairs, the staff 
La Vie has decided to place the V 3, 
pers received from neighboring c0 
legesi in the library. These pap er ^ 
will be kept in the paper corner 
the reading room. They will be 
vailable for use for all students 3 
should be read by all. We hope <*• 
this appeals to the students and tn 
they will make use of the oppoi" tun 
ity. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



"You'll die when you hear this one," roared the jovial judge about to 
deliver a death sentence. 

LVC 



CAMPUS POETRY 



"You said I could take you out whenever I pleased." 
"Yes, but you don't please." 



-LVC- 



She was called the town belle — someone was always ringing her up. 

LVC 

"Where are you going, daughter?" 
"To get water." 
"In your pajamas?" 
"No, in this glass." 

LVC 



"Let's give the bride a shower. 1 
"0. K. I'll bring the soap." 



-LVC- 



Not so dumb — the cake-eater who proposed in a bungalow so that her 
father couldn't kick him downstairs. 

LVC 



Eva — Let me have some ginger ale. 

Henry— Pale? 

Eva — No, a glass will do. 

LVC- 



"Are you the lady that washes?' 
"Of course not." 
"Oh, you dirty thing." 



TO G 

It is not easy to name 
What thing there are that makes me 
Think of you, for you are — every- 
where — 

In all think that I love. Like to say 
"That clear cold water was so goc. 
to taste, 

"For I was thirsty all the long hot 
walk." 

Or when the rain comes down slant- 
wise 

And silver, over brown crumbled 
earth 

And drooping corn, to cry, 
"Oh, the leaves will straighten now. 
"Like whispering banners, and the 
plants 

"Will thrive and grow." 

\ 

For, when I think of you 
The dearest, homliest things 
Come flooding in my mind. 
The drifting smoke of fallen leaves 
Late burned at twilight in 
Some quiet street. Brown crusted 
loaves 

That split apart, easily and clean — 
Fresh scrubbed floors, and lamp-light 
Hazy, through the tangled lashes 
Of a child's sleep-heavy eyes — a child 
Who, someway, is myself, held close 
Against the mothe-softness that is 
you. 



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Bill — I'm stuck on this question. 
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"Does your wife care for housework ? ' 
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ftfi LlEVE IT OR NOT- 

J^utchinson can't see how "a la mode" means ice cream. 
Those who "knock" LA VIE are usually the first to yell if it isn't out 
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Moo se ' s f avor it e expression, since securing a slide rjule, is "Give me two 
•umbers." 

^ r °f. Stephenson intends to make a lawyer out of Ann Wolf, 
girl who looks back is forward. 



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tforatius was the guy who threw a big bridge party. 




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TELEPHONED 

fJMolher and T)ad 




a great many voices are 

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Tonight, just like every other night, 
there will be a great exodus of Voices — 
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And there will be a grand influx of ma- 
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It's a fair exchange, too, that brings a 
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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1930. 



MARINES TROUNCE 

LOCAL GRIDMEN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



weight told strongly as they battered 
our line to pieces. They gained al- 
most at will until near Lebanon Val- 
ley's goal when each time our team 
, held for downs. This defense of the 
goal line was one of the outstanding- 
features of the game. 

Lebanon Valley did practically 
nothing on the offense the second 
half for each time we got the ball 
we were forced to kick out to safer 
territory. 

Due to injuries Lebanon Valley 
presented a different left side of the 
line than that which started the 
games heretofore. Patrizio, quarter- 
back, is also on the injured list his 
place being filled by Slack and Reed- 
er who alternated in calling signals. 

The lineup and summary: 



L. V. C. 
Williams 
Sprenkle 
Kleinfelter 
Wogan 
J. Wood 
Kelly 
Volkins 
Slack 
M, Light 
Daub 
S. Light 



U. S. MARINES 



Ferrel 
Beatty 
Crowe 
Pressley 
Standley 
Cummings 
Glick 
McCaffery 
Long 
Poppleman 
O'Neill 



L. E. 
L. T. 
L. G. 

C. 
R. G. 
R. T. 
R. E. 
Q. B. 
L. H. B. 
R. H. B. 
F. B. 
Score by periods: 

L. V. C 0—0 

U. S. Marines 7 0—7 

Touchdowns — Poppleman. Point 
after touchdown — McCaffery (drop 
kick). 

Substitutions — Lebanon Valley: 
Reeder for Daub, Heller for Volkins ; 
Nye for S. Light, Orsino for M. 
Light, Murphy for Wogan, Daub foi 
Reeder, S. Light for Nye, Wogan fo; 
Murphy, Reeder for Daub, Murphy 
for Wogan, Lechthaelr for Kleinfel- 
ter, Kleinfelter for Lechthaler, Mor- 
ris for Wood, Volkins for Sprenkle 
U. S. Marines: Truckenmiller for 
Beatty, Robinson for O'Neill, Gann 
for Crowe. 

Referee — R. E. Kinney, Trinity 
Umpire— P. L. Reagan, Villanova. 
Head linesman— R. H. Craig, Penn 
State. Time of periods— 15 minutes. 



STATE LIBRARIANS 

MEET IN CONFERENCE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



he invades the field of economics, 
philosophy and probition he is hope- 
lessly lost. As for the Frankenstein 
Chorus, he believes that only two of 
their ten points carry any signifi- 
cance. The first, that man is invent- 
ing to much distinctive machinery. 
The last that the cause of our present 
unemployment is technological. 

Following Mr. Chase's talk, Dr. 
Godcharles presented some motions 
pictures of his California trip. 

Among those from Lebanon Val- 
ley who attended all or part of the 
convention were: Prof, and Mrs. Ben- 
der, Miss Myers, Mrs. Green, Miss 
Lietzau, Prof. Stokes, Prof. Steven- 
son, .Russel Etter, Philip Barnes, 
Alvin Kinney, Dean Salada, Walter 
Krumbiegel, Randolph Miller, Charles 
J. Myers, Alan S. Shortlidge, and 
Mr. Mentzer. 




pal speaker at a W. M. A. Institute 
in Baltimore, Oct. 23, and left Oct. 
24 for Ohio, where she will spend 
about ten days. 



Rev. and Mrs. C. Guy Stambach 
announced the birth of a son on 
October 1, at the home of Mrs. Stam- 
bach's parents in York, Penna. Mr. 
Stambach, '16, is beginning his third 
year as pastor of Salem United 
Brethren church, Baltimore. 



Miss Ann Apgar, '28, and Dr. 
Charles L. Mengel were married, 
June 3, 193, in Allentown. The at- 
tendants of the bride were as fol- 
lows: Hilda Buckley, '32, maid of 
honor, and Fae Bachman, '30 and 
ary cCurdy, 30, bridesmaids. Dr. and 
Mrs. Mengel are now living in Balti- 
more, Maryland, where Mr. Mengle 
is practicing medicine. 



Miss Lottie M. Spessard, '13, super- 
intendent of the United Brethren 
Hospital at San Fernando, Philip- 
pine Islands, is home on furlough. 
She is making Smithsburg, Md., her 
herdquarters. She came home by 
way of Europe, attended the Inter- 
lational Christian Endeavor Conven- 
; cn in Germany, and the Passion 
^lay at Oberammergan and visited 
/ery many points of interest. At 
Present she is bringing the needs of 
he mission field before the various 
congregations of United Brethren in 
he Eastern part of the U. S. She 
".poke at Fulton Avenue and Otter- 
bein Memorial churches, Baltimore 
Md., Sunday, Oct. 12, was the princi- 



Alumni. 

Subscribe For La Vie Collegienne, 



How soothing and refreshing 
Is a little bubbling brook, 
Where the light of day is fading, 
In a quiet shady nook; 

Where the dusky light of day still 

lingers. 
Casting here a silver hue: 
The willow branches touch as fingers 
The clear reflecting water's blue. 

i 

The overcast of black is brightened 
By a crescent and by stars, 
Casting rays from Heven earthward, 
Forming graceful silver bars. 

Evangeline Salois, 

Class of 1934 



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Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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children by Miss Rose Fyleman anc 
an address on the Indian Life on the 
Susquehanna by Dr. Donald Cad- 
zow, Director of The Archaelogicai 
Survey of Pennsylvania Historical 
Commission. : Friday,, October 24. 
Discussion: "Relation of School Li- 
braries to Public Libraries," by Hen- 
ry F. Marx, Easton Public Library, 
Easton, Pa.; Miss Pauline Schmid, 
Librarian, Hillside School, Mont- 
clair, N. J.; Miss Mildred Pape, Li- 
brarian, Girard College, Philadelphia, 
Pa. An address by Miss Anna M. 
MacDonald, Extension Librarian. Li- 
brary Extension Division, Pennsyl- 
vania State Library, Harrisburg, Pa. 
A Busines Meeting and adjournment. 

Though those in this school con- 
nected with library work attended 
'the entire convention the greatest 
group of the school went to hear the 
lecture of Stuart P. Chase a noted 
economist and author. 

Mr. Chase's topic . was "Men and 
Machines", a subject in which he is 
especially qualified having written 
several books and innumerable ar- 
ticles upon it. The main theme of 
Mr. Chase's talk concerned the re- 
conciling of the Frankenstein chorus 
with the Ford bandwagon. Mr. Chase 
in his talk started that he respected 
that mans views so long as they con- 
cerned themselves with the field in 
which Mr. Ford is a leader but when 



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LET'S GO— 

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School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S; Esbenshade, '03. 

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LET'S BEAT 
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lalfieCflll^iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



EXAMINATIONS 
HOLD TIGHT. HANG ON. 
GOOD LUCK. 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 1930 



No. 6. 



L.V.Nosed Out In Final Period By Mt. St. Mary's 



RECOVERED PUNT PROVIDES VICTORY 

MYLINMEN COMPLETELY OUTPLAY RIVALS DURING 
ENTIRE GAME. WILLIAMS TAKES PASS 
FOR ONLY SCORE 



With a victory almost in her 
hands, Lebanon Valley saw it slip a- 
way as Mt. St. Mary's scored a 
touchdown on a long pass and then 
kicked the extra point to nose out 
L. V. 7-6 in one of the most excit- 
ing games ever played at Emmits- 
burg. 

The game was nip and tuck for 
three quarters, with the ball see- 
sawing up and down the field with 
neither team possessing the punch to 
carry the oval across the final chalk 
line. On one occasion Lebanon Valley 
failed to make a fraction of a yard 
that would have given us first down 
on Mt. St. Mary's four yard line. 
Mt. St Mary's then kicked out of dan- 
ger. 

In the lourth quarter Kelly broke 
through the opponents' defense and 
blocked a kick on the fourth down, 
Williams snared a pass on the eight- 
yard mark and went over for the 
first score of the game. The try 
for the extra point was wide of the 
mark. 

Lebanon Valley kicked off and Mt. 
St. Mary's was unable to gain. After 
several exchange of punts they re- 
ceived a break which started them 
on the way to a touchdown. A short 
punt, which was purposely left fall 
to the ground by our safety man 
took a bounce backward and touched 
Reeder making it a free ball. A Mt. 
St. Mary's linesman recovered it or 
Lebanon's 45-yard line. 

Two plays put the ball on the 40 
yard line. On the next attempt 
Connell dropped back and threw s 



>;long pass to Edolon who caught the 
ball and ran the remainder of the 
distance to the goal line. With the 
wind against him, Connell dropped 
the oval over the cross bars for the 
extra point and victory. The final 
minute brought no success to Leb- 
anon Valley's hectic efforts to com- 
plete a forward pass. 

Continued on Page 4) 



Y,W, RECOGNITION 
FOR NEW GIRLS 

FITTING CEREMONY 
USHERS IN NEW 
Y MEMBERS 



WHAT SOME OTHERS 
THINK OF IT. 



While agitation is rife on the haz- 
ing problem, it is of interest to note 
the opinion of those outside of col- 
lege circles on this once important 
phase of school life. We reprint 
an article from the Philadelphia In- 
suire which discusses the recent 
Dartmouth Coollege affair. 

The studend-governing body at 
Dartmouth has declared hazing of 
freshmen illegal and punishable on 
the grounds that the practice was 
of no benefit to first-year men, was 
frequently of considerable harm to 
them and was degeneerating into a 
form of entertainment out of charac- 
ter with the general atmosphere of 
the college. 

This is an enlightened stand. The 
best that can be said for hazing is 
that it enables big toads from little 
prep school puddles to find their 
proper places in the larger pool of 
college life sooner than they other- 
wise might. That is a good thing 
for those freshies who need it, a 
well as for other students who have 
to tread the same campus with them 
The fundamenal objection to inuus- 
eriminate hazing is the injustice oi 
visiting its humiliation on all mem- 
bers of a class, weather they deserve 

Continued on Page 4; 



In a very impressive service, the 
"new" girls were formally recogniz- 
ed in the Y.W.C.A. Sunday even- 
ing at 5.45 P.M. in North Hall Palor. 

While Eulalie Morton played a pre- 
lude on the piano, each "big sister" 
escorted her "little sister" into the 
Parlor. After the final strains of the 
music had drifted away, Sara Ens- 
minger, as president of the Y. W. C. 
A--, and four "Y" girls, all dressed in 
white, slowly marched to the altar 
in the front of the room while Caro- 
le Fisher, Dorothy Hafer and Mil- 
dred Christianson softly sang "I 
Would be True." The president 
s Poke for a few minutes on the sig- 
nificance and worth of the Young 
^omen's Christian Association and 
dwelt particularly on the letters, Y. 

C A. and what each one should 
mean to us. Miriam Book spoke on 
"Youth," Naomi Shrively on "Wom- 
en," Anna Kiehl on "Christian" and 
Edith Fields on "Association." 



To the music of '"Follow the 
Gleam"each new girl in turn was led 
to the altar by her escort and was 
given the clasp of friendship of the 
Y. W. C. A. making her a part of the 
great organization. The "big sister" 
presented a Y. W. C. A. emblem, in 
the form of a pin, to her "little sis 
ter.-" 

After each girl had been recogmz 
ed as a real Y. W. C. A. member, the 
group made a pretty precession with 
their lighted candles as they walked 
out on the campus, everyone singing 
"Follow the Gleam." There the girls 
formed a triangle, the sign of the 
"Y" and every girl, one by one, blew 
out her candle which had been rpe- 
sented to her at the altar. Marie 
Gelwicks dismissed the group with a 
short prayer. 

The service was verv worth-while 



MUCH GAIETY AMONG 
MASQUERADERS AS 
SPIRITS RISE 



On Hallowe'en night, obeying the 
lure of the will o' the wisp, about a 
hundred and fifty forms, apparitions, 
and spectres gathered together in the 
alumni Gymnasium, festooned and 
atmosphered in owls, whiches, 
shocks!! (Corn shocks - - !)for the 
occasion. A most delightful program 
had been arranged, after the gro- 
tesque and fanciful garments had 
been found to clothe humen beings 
and many a laugh echoed thru the 
hall as a new identity was revealed. 
The first number of the arranged pro- 
gram contained a real surprise. — 
Helen Franklin the clevel toe-dancer, 
in person, portrayed a unique acro- 
batic feat, in the form of a dance. 
This was appreciated and applauded 
heartily. Dr. Wallace, who has al- 
ways been accorded a welcome recep- 
tion, because of his facile narrative 
manner rendered a most interesting 
£ale to his charmed audience. Evan- 
geline Salerio follewen with an un- 
usual dexterous tap dance, revealing 
much grace and natural ability. Miss 
Salerio, altho' just a newcomer, has 
already demonstrated much talent. 
Games were played such as ring on 
the string, to which many respond- 
ed. A great "bruit" added to the 
general hubbub and merrymaking 
when horns and whistles were pas. 
put. Delicious refreshments were 
served and the remainder of the 
evening passed to the swishing of 
feet, as couples vied with each other 
to tho rollicking tunes of the piano 
and the ever-ready "vie." 



POSITIONS FOUND 
BY CLASS OF '30 

RECENT GRADS FIND 
DIVERSITY OF 
OCCUPATION 



STAR COURSE PLAY 
ENJOYED BY ALL 

"HER HUSBAND'S WIFE" 
PLEASES STUDENTS 
AND FRIENDS 



The Star Course Committee had 
the pleasure of presenting "Her 
Husband's Wife" last evening in the 
College Chapel. This was a three 
act comedy by A. E. Thomas. Tie 
Cast of Characters follows: 
Stuart Randolph — David Pritchard 
Richard Belden, his brother-in-law 
— Leavitt Tudor. 

John Belden, Richards' Uncle — Ca- 
on Davenport 

Irene Randolph, Stuart's wife — 
Mary Newnham-Davis. 

Emily Laden — Evelyn M ; ller. 
All three acts took place in the 
drawing room of the Randolph's at 
Saratoga. 
ACT I. An afternoon 
ACT II. Three Days Later. Half- 
past Fiv in the afternoon 
ACT III. Seven O'clock the same 
evening . 

The play began with Mrs. Ran- 
dolph setting the background for the 
rest of the play by her disillusioned 
thoughts that she was sick, yet nei 
*her she ncr her doctors, six of them, 
with her. All she knew or though' 
she knew was th°t rhe was s : :k H 
what, she cared not. 

Richard Beldam her brother having 
lost in his suit for Emily J>dew'- 
Vnd. has turned to horse racing U 
occudv his mind. 

Stuart Randolph, her husband. wa=- 
in+eT-pp+fMi chiiefly in his wife and ir 
his business. 

Irene expresses to her Uncle. Johr 
Belden the desire of having s^me^n- 
to take e^re of her husband af^er! 
her death- likewise her determination 
to die in a short time. Emily Ladew, 



L.V.G. ORCHESTRA 
BEGINS CAREER 

ORGANIZATION STARTS 
PRACTICE AND 
ELECTS HEAD 



who hps just returne- 



Paris 



it is of interest to us all to know 
where and whaj the graduates of '30 
are working now. The following list 
will give us this information as fei 
as is known. Roy Albright, New 
York Telephone Co., Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
Horner Allwein, Accountant, Revenua 
Acctg., N. Y. Telephone Co.. lives in 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; Joseph W. Allwem 
Medical Student, Temple University. 
Phila.; Mary E. Ax, teacher in South 
Sheuango H. S.. Westford, Crawford 
Co., Pa.; Alfred Barnhart, Sales Dept. 
of Associated Gas and Electric Sys- 
tem, Lebanon, Pa.; Clarence P. Barn- 
hart, teacher in Williamstown, Md.- 
Glenn E. Bendigo. teacher in Portor 
Twp. H. C. Reinertown, Penna.; Louise 
Broughter, teaching in Lebanon Jr. 
H. S. Lebanon, Pa.: Dorthy Boyer. 
teaching English in Jr. H. S., Gsttys- 
burg, Pa.; Blanche Cochrane teaching 
in H. S.. Paradise, Pa.; Ruth Cooper 
teacher in H. S. Westville. N. Y.r 
Heien Copenhaver, teacher in H. S 



and should play a significant part in Summit> Pa . ; Corinne Dyne 

the life of each of the new members Clark s summit, d , 
me me ui teacher in Hannah Penn Jr. ri. b., 

to many pe Joseph Fiore ii e , Stu- 

f or it makes the Y. W. C A stand ^ 

out as a means of helping the gins aem, 



'? ehoosen as the lon-i^I successor 
to Ivcne because she is more or les? 
of the old maid type, and because 
Irene thinks that rh- will not be loved 
by S^u^rt as ^he was. Emily realiz- 
ing that she h°s ben rrossly insult- 
ed, decided to get reven<re on Irene 
by really making herself attractive 
and by arranging- some interest in 
her on the pai-t of Stu?rt. 

Stuart is completely won over by 
Emily and after a while pavs more 
attention to her than to his wife. 
Jealousy is the inevitable result. 



Among the other musical activities 
of L. V. we can now boast of a 
school orchestra, whose progress has 
been taking rapid strides for the past 
several weeks and is now fully or- 
ganized. This orchestra is indeed 
fortunate in having for its director 
Mr. John Myer, of Reading, Pennsyl- 
vania. Having acquired his entire 
education in Germany, Mr. Myer now 
has the reputation of being one of the 
finest musicians in this section of 
the country. Besides being a concert 
celloist of great renown, Mr. Myer 
conducts studios in Reading and Har- 
r-isburg String Quartet, being coach 
of the latter. 

The orchestra meets every Wed- 
nesday evening in the Engle Conser- 
vatory. At the most recent meeting 
a definite organization was effected 
and the following officers were elect- 
ed: Pres. George Snowhill, Sec. and 
Treas. Virginia Thrush, Librarians 
Matilda Bonanni and Newton Berg- 
ner. 

The attendance at rehearsals has 
been excellent and the following now 
comprise our all college odchestra: 
Violin: Italo L. Rossinni, Wi.ber Ma- 
thias, Christine G. Garbsr, Matilda 
Bonanni, Carl Myers, Clintcn Allen. 
Francis Barr, and Gretna Drawbaugh; 
Cello: Virginia G. Thrush, Henrietta 
Heilman, and Evangeline B. Salario. 
Clarinet: Helen Eddy, Harry Zeck, 
Melvin Sponsler, and Regina Oyer, 
Trumpets: Warren Lebo, Leona Allen, 
William Barnes, Samuel Ulrich, and 
Lester Reed; Trombone: Leonaid 
Shrope; Savaphone: Donald Shope, 
Gecrge Snowbill, and Richard Slay- 
baugh, and Pianist: Newton Burg- 
ner. 



i COLLEGE CALENDAR 



CALENDAR 
Thursday, Nov. 6- -D^Db an. 
Frday. NW. 7 — Icint Delphian 

— Kalo Session. 
Saturday, NT>v. 8- -Game at 

Lebanon with Washington 

College. Junior Party. 
Sunday, Nov. 9 — Fremdly Hr. 

5:45. 

Monday. Nov 10— Begining 
Mid-Semester Examinations 



CLIO SELECTS PLAY 
FOR ANNIVERSARY 

"THE CRADLE SONG" 
BY SIERRA IS 
CHOSEN 

The play choosen by Clio for the 
commemoration of her 60th. anniver- 
sary is "The Cradle Song" by Maria 
and G. Martinez Sierrei, translated 
from the Spanish by John Garrett 
Urdeihill. Preparation for the pro- 
duction is already well under way 
under the direction of Miss Mary K. 
Wallace. 

"The Cradle Song" has been one 
of he plays produced with much suc- 
cess by the Civic Sepertory Theatre 
of New York, headed by Eva Le 
Gallienne. Its scene is laid in a con- 
vent of Dominician Nuns; it is 
teresting to note that there is a lapse 
rf eighteen years between the first 

nd secend acts. 

Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 .... Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

RE POUT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Madeline Sheddy, '31 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Carber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosniian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1S79. 



EXAMINATIONS 



When, in the course of student 
activities, it becomes necessary that 
the professors of an institution of 
learning make inquires as to the ef- 
fectiveness of their instruction, a- 
foresaid activities come to a standstill 
and the truth comes out. Those who 
have kept their lamps trimmed and 
have not forgotten the oii are more 
likely to come out of the fray un- 
scathed than are those who have pur- 
sued other paths. 

Viewed in another light, examin- 
ation period precipitates the colloidal 
information of the average student 
and awakes in him a realization of 
his personal statis. The Imore he 
knows, the more he knows he ought 
to know, and as a result he strength- 
ens his resolutions and again faces 
his ideal. 

Let us hope that all, and especially 
the new students, will find inspiration 
in the fact that the purpose of exam- 
ination is to give thes cholar a bet- 
ter knowledge of himself. By ad- 
hering to this principle, one can feel 
that he will eventually break down 
the barriers of ignorance. Only so 
can progress be made, and graduates 
of our colleges can rest assured that 
they have measured up to the stand- 
ards required of them. For, "A lit- 
tle learning is a dangerous thing; 
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian 
Spring." i 



An attempt was made last year 
to carry out such a program, but 
that was late in the year and the 
spirits of all had waned to such an 
extent that 'nobody bothered.' So 
the societites will strike while the 
iron is stll warm, and may there be 
results! 



FROSH THOUGHTS 



JOINT SESSIONS 



There has been considerable sp:c- 
ulatiori as to the future of the Lit- 
erary societies. It is of course plain 
to every one that something must be 
done, and an attempt to rejuvenate 
them will be made tomorrow nigh 4 , 
Jvhen Kalo ana Delphian hod ther. 
CLOSED joint session. Previously 
any body could come ^ was invited 
to partake of the refreshments and 
pleasure offered by them. This nat- 
urally killed at least one ineenti for 
joining a society. The trend d 
thought was, "If I can get something 
for nothing, why shauld I pay for it? 
If I can enjoy all the priviliges with- 
out joining and paying initiation fees 
and dues, why should I join?" And 
such was really the case, espacialiy 
with the men's societies. No one was 
ever baiTed from a meeting; anniver- 
sary seats could be had for the asK- 
ing; joint sessions were open to all; 
and how many wanted to take part 
in the plays presented?" 

But now a move will be made to 
'cut that out'. To continue such a 
polivy would be extremely unfair 
to those who did join and would give 
good reason for others not to join. 



Is there anyone who, at some time 
or other, has not experienced an at- 
tack of that depressing malady which 
we call the blues? Briefly defined,, 
the blues, or megrims, is a temorary 
state of mind in which a person at- 
taches the most gloomy significance 
to all facts and occurences. How 
this condition of low spirits came to 
be called the blues is easily under- 
stood when one remembers that blues 
and its ajacent colors in the spec- 
trum are generally associated with 
cold and darkness, while red and 
other colors antithetical to blue are 
thought of in connection with warm- 
eth and vivacity. 

The main cause of this dejection 
is the weather, cr, more particularly, 
bad weather. I am sure that every- 
one, when the. days are cold and bleak, 
when thes un is hidden and the trees 
are gaunt, dark spectres against the 
sky — that everyone experiences a 
mood just opposite to that felt when 
thes un is shining and the birds are 
singing in the foliage. Another oc- 
casional factor in producing the meg- 
rims is any discouraging incident that 
may occur. We too late discover a 
disastrous error made in an exam'n- 
ation just finished, we enter into dis- 
mal conjectures as to the effect the 
mistrke will have on our grade, we 
become convinced thst we have failed 
ard lo, we are in the clutch of the 
b'ues. Everyone has had like ex- 
periences, though possibly from dif- 
ferent causes. 

However great things have bean 
done by persons groveling, in the 
reptbs o? dejecfcicn. Ed^ar Allen 
P~e probably suffered from his own 
artistic type of the blues; surely i' 
wn.s no b'i^sfully high-spirited poe' 
who panned "The Raven" and "The 
!CcTj,queror Worm". Also, were it 
not for our moments of despondance 
l h~re could be no comparison by 
wh'ch to appreciate cur pleirurab'e 
and buoyrnt moods. A?cordinglv 
let us consider the b'ues ?s a neces- 
sary evil, as a tr'al from which th^re 
is no escape, rnd as a psychological 
phenomenon which fusils a definite 
purpose. 

Edmund H. Umberger 



MORE OPINION 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Great Britian's new policy of re- 
striction or prohibiting the settle- 
ment of Jews in Palestine was pro- 
tested by a mass meeting of several 
thousand people in Madison Square 
Gardens. The meeting was held un- 
der the Zionist Organization of 
America. They declared it was a 
repudiation of the Balfour Declara- 
tion of 1917 for the establishment of 
a Jewish homeland in Palestine. 
This meeting was held on the thir- 
teenth anniversary of Balfour's de- 
claration and for the purpose of pro- 
testing at the reversal of this policy. 

Forty-two Princeton undergradu- 
ates are now suffering from discip- 
linary action of a drastic nature for 
participating and inciting a riot. 
Four men, supposedly ring leaders, 
are suspended for one year, two un- 
til the end of the Christmas holidays, 
five for one month, tliree for two 
weeks, fourteen for one week and 
fourteen for an indefinite period. 

Prince Haile Selassie I, who claims 
descent frcm King Solomon and the 
Queen of Sheeba, was recently 
crowned Emperor of Abyssinia. Prep- 
arations for this ceremony has cost 
the government $3000 ; 000. and six 
months work. There was a great 
display of barbaric splendor. One 
of the Emperor's first acts was to 
entertain 25,000 of his tribesmen at 
a feast of raw meat and wine. Five 
thousand cattle were slaughtered for 
this feast.' 

Here is a case which is parallel 
to Edison's "desert" problem. The 
decision of San Francisco physicians 
was to let a woman die rather than 
give her the benifit of a respirator 
in use on a man at the time she was 
admitted. The hospital authorities 
had not stopped to consider that at 
some time two patients rcquir'ng art- 
ficial respiration might be in the in- 
stitution at the same time. 

There, was a severe earthquake a- 
long the upper Adriatic coast a few 
days ago, which took 25 lives and in- 
jured more than 350 people. There 
were three distinct shocks, the first 
one lasting twenty minutes, felt in 
wide areas from Trieste to Naples, 
and Rome. The heaviest damage 
was in a twenty-five mile semi-circle. 
The Adriatic Sea boiled but there 
was no Tidle wave. Military relief 
was sent immediately and there was 
no time lost in seai'ching homes and 
buildings for refugees trapped by, 
fallen walls. 



Harry Payne Whitney, sportsman 
and capitalist, has died recently of 
pneumonia, after an illness of sever- 
al weeks. He was the son of Wm. C. 
Whitney, Secretary of the Navy in 
the Cabinet of Pres. Cleveland. He 
was known as one of America's pre- 
mier sportsmen. He spent vast sums 
toward the development of turf sports. 
In 1924 his throughbreds, said to num- 
ber more than 200, made the largest 
winning of any stable in the country, 
aggregating a half million dollars. 



Sport Shots 



President Hoover has denounced 
recent charges of dishonesty and mis- 
feasance in the distribution of oil 
shale lands by the Department of the 
Interior as a political attempt to fos- 
ter an oil scandel upon his admin- 
istration. 



At noon on Nov. 1st Jresident 
Hoover is scheduled to press a but- 
ton that will officially open the new 
Detroit and Canada Tunnel, linking 
Detroit and Windsor, Ontorio. This 
tunnel was originally planned for a 



Jack (Legs) Diamond's condition 
has been reported as satisfactory, 
according to a bulletin issued from 
the Metropolitan Hospital on Welfare 
Island, where he was taken when he 
was ejected from Polyclinic Hospital. 



Paleopitus, the student governing 
body of Dartmouth College, have 
abolished Freshman hazing. They 
made the announcement that all 
Freshmen rules have been done away 
with, except the wearing of the little 
green caps. The yearlings will no 
longer be forced to wear coats and 
ties and be compelled to walk in 
paths instead of the grass of the cam- 
pus, which was their lot by tradition. 



Philip F. LaFollette, 33 years old, 
son of the late United States Senator 
Robert M. LaFollette, has just won 
the Republican nomination for Gov- 
ernor of Wisconsin, where it is re- 
garded as the equivalent of election. 
He won by some 100,000 votes over 
Governor Walter Kohler. Philip La 
Follette's election as Governor in 
November, will come exactly thirty 
years after his father was elected to 
the same office. 

Charles M. Schwab, steel magnate, 
turned over the first shovelful of 
ground today, preliminary to the con- 
struction of the new Schwab Science 
Hall of St. Francis College, Loretta, 
Pa. This new addition to the college, 
which will cost about $150,000, was 
made possible by a gift from Schwab. 



Most pictures of the American col 
lege are distorted — lop-sided and fuz- 
zy around the edges like a picture in 
a lurrent radio advertisement. In a 
recent convocation address President 
Ernest Martin Hopkins of Dartmouth 
t"ave a more accurate picture. Said 
he: 

"The true portrait of the Ameri- 
can college would show a community 
in which generosity of spirit and 
graces of culture ar predominant, 
where eagerness for truth and wis- 
dom pervades the atmosphere, where 
the cooperative enterprise which we 
call education is carried on with mu- 
tual esteem and respct btween facul- 
t and students. It would likewise 
show, to be sure, some degree of self- 
seeking and self-indulgences, some 
effort to arrogate special privileges 
to individual selves, some pride of 
opinion, some intellectual arrogance, 
and some close-mindedness, but these 
would appear as the are, merely as 
blemishes upon the portrait. Each 
college generation has it within its 
power to refin r smudge this por- 
trait." 



Early returns in the Pennsylvania 
sruberatorial contest gave Pinchot a 
lead in the up-state-counties. Returns 
from Philadelphia, however, showed 
that Hamphill received about 250, 
000 votes from Republicans. 



James Hamilton Lewis. Democi-at, 
took an early lead over Ruth Hanna 
McCormich, Republican, in scattered 
returns from the election. 



Dwight W. Morrow's election as 
United States Senator was the out- 
standing feature of New Jersey's e- 
lection. 



Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
Democratic candidate for reelection in 
New York, won by a large plurality. 



The Prince of Wales may take his 
youngest brother, Prince George, with 
him on his trip to South America 
early next year. Both are studing 
Spanish in preparation of the trip. 
It is believed the Prince will sail a- 
bout the middle of January and will 
be present for the opening of the 
British exhibition at Buenos Aires, 
March 14th. 



Fire believed to be of incendiary 
origin burned for more than three 
hours, destroying the old Neversink 
Mountain Hotel, for forty years a 
landmark above the city of Reading, 
Pa. 



Getulio Vargas, a leading figure in 
the Brazilian revolution which began 
October 3rd, has definitely been cho- 
sen provisional President of the Bra- 
zilian government. 




The executive committee of the 
Alumni Association of L. V. held a 
meeting October, 23, at which time 
Miss Anna Kreider was elected to 
fill the vacancy left when Mr. Walter 
Esbenshade, '03 formerly a member 
of the committee, was elected Pres- 
ident of the Association. The cam- 
tnittee also began its plans for the 
annual Alumni day to be held next 
spring. 

Edgar C. Hastings '21 is pursuing 
graduate work in the field of Educa- 
tion at the Unversity of Michigan. 
His address is 337 E. Jefferson St., 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 



Tough luck, Gang! Let's take it out 
on Washington this week. 

The game with Washington will be 
on the Bethlehem Steel Field in Leb- 
anon instead of in York as was p re . 
viously reported. 

Wiliams scored a touchdown after 
coming near one on two former oc- 
casions. Both in the State and Muhl- 
enberg games he was thrown out of 
bounds near the goal line afttr catch- 
ing a forward pass. 

While Lebanon Valley was being 
nosed out by Mt. St. Mary's, Wash- 
ington College was taking a 44 

beating at the hands of Drexel. 

Juniata lost to Westminister 19 

and Allbright had an easy time with 
St. Joseph winning 35 — 6. 

With the return of the twenty-five, 
tug practise can again be resumed. 
The tug-of-war will be staged next 
week some time. 

There will be a cold, cold bath for 
the losers, so that the boys will prob- 
ably pull harder than ever. 

After the tug comes the class foot- 
ball game which will mose likely be 
played the Saturday before Thanks- 
giving, Nov. 22. The varsity does 
not have a game that week. 

"Bernie" Thrush's leg has healed up 
nicely and "Bernie" is back in uni- 
form again. 

"Red" Wogan is the latest one to 
join the list of cripples on the team. 
He is nursing a bad knee that is caus- 
ing him lots of trouble. 

On Tuesday night the team had a 
much needed rest due to the disagree- 
able weather. 

The boys are all pepped up for this 
week's game and since it will be 
played bfore a local croud they should 
come through with a bang, 
-itwill 

"Hooks" Mylin will be able to pre- 
sent the full strength of th lineup 
since none of the squad is hurt 
enough to keep him oct of the game. 

Just as a pleasant thought: would 
it not be nice to win the remaining 
three games, Washington, Juniata, 
and Albright. 

Let's go team!!! 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



This isn't the Sport Column, but 
we believe that mention should be 
made of the Muhlenberg — Lehigh 
game. The Muhle defeated the Brown 
to the tune of 24-0 and we beat the 
Mulhle 14-12. Comparative scores 
perhaps don't mean a thing but 
somehow we love comparing. 



"Handshaking" the profs is con- 
sidered unethical by the student 
body, but we wonder what the World 
has to say for it. Information on this 
topic would be greatly appreciated. 



Walter Winchell, New York col- 
umnist, is now working on his second 
million, having given up all hopes of 
making the first. Which one are you 
working on? 



Exam? Oh yes, exams. They're a 
pleasure if you know the stuff. M 
not, why then, some move must be 
made to abolish them. 



The Gentlemen of the Press, as our 
editor pointed out last week, are not 
gentlemen, but there may be excep- 
tions. 



There are still many empty seats 
during a Star Course performance, 
and if this keeps up we may 
have any more Chapel speakers. ** 
must bo kept in mind that the Star 
Continued on Page 4) 



1 




LA V ^ 5° LLEGIENNE> THUR SDAY, NOVEMBER 6 1930 



PAGE THREE 



CAMPUS POETRY 



"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



"I've skated for hours on end." 
"It must be very painful." 



-LVC- 



"My wife used to play the piano a lot, but since the -children came she 
doesn't have time.'* 

"Children are a comfort, aren't they?" 

LVC 

Dean — What gave you the idea of wearing a mustache ? 
Skee — Oh, it just grew on me. 

LVC 

"Did your girl friend make the train?" 
"No — only the conductor!" 

LVC 

Prof. — Have I ever told this joke before? 
Chorus — Yes!! 

Prof. — Then perhaps you will understand it this time. 

LVC 

Mary's not Charley's best girl. No not his best. Necks best, though. 

LVC 

'"Are mine the only lips you ever kissed? 
"Absolutely — and the nicest." 

LVC 

Ruth— The election returns show that Hemphill is leading. 
Ann Augusta — Where, in Pennsylvania? 

LVC 

Parent— If you married my daughter, it would kill me. 
Suitor— Can I depend on that? 

LVC ■ 

Dora— But, mother, I can't marry him. He's an atheist and doesn't 
believe in hell. 

Mother — Go ahead and marry him, dear! 

LVC 

He has a German horn on his car." 
"How do you know?" 
"Well, he's always Teutan it.' 

-LVC- 



On mountain height I see the sun; 
It tells the world that day's begun; 
It sends its lances, long and grey, 
Across the sky to clear the way. 
The flower now lifts up its head, 
Which through the night had seem- 
ed so dead. 

The waters too are sparkling bright; 
They looked so dull to ma last night' 
The birds have long begun to sing. 
And furies to desert their ring. 
The df.wn is here; the day's bagun, 
On mountain height I see the sun. 

On mountain height I see the sun; 
It tells the world that day is done, 
The pine-tree's silhouette is clear; 
That's proof enough that night is 
near. 

The cattle home their way they pled 
Across the close cropped field of sod. 

The frogs have all begun to croak, 
On lily pads they laugh and joke, 
The crickets now begin to sing, 
And moths and bats are on the wing. 
The night is here and day is done, 
On mountain height I see the sun. 



SHEET MUSIC MUSICAL BOOKS 

MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

YE COZY INN, H. C. COFFROATH, Prop. 
Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Si-v-ir! D'nnerr, and A T rs-t^ «^ -- v ;» e 
AT~nl" Parking Soa<v» Wo s~rvp WJ'H * q™:^ 




FACULTY ..NEWS 



Dr. and Mrs. Gossard have gone to 
Atlantic City for a two weeks va- 
| cation and rest. 

Miss Gillespie has gone to Indiana 
Normal School to attend a confer- 
ence. She is to be absent for one 
I week. 

Madame Green attended a Confer- 
ence of Deans at Harrisburg on Sat- 
urday, November 1st. Those pres- 
ent enjoyed a banquet and the inter- 
esting talk by The President of the 
State College. 



'How would you classify a telephone girl? Is hers a business or a 
Profession?" 

"Neither. It's a calling." 

LVC 

Left— a penny for your thoughts. 
Kight-— Don't wanna ruin my amature standing. 

LVC 

* n <hgnant wife (to incoming husband).— What does the clock say? 
»hay " sband ~ It sha y s 'tick - tock' and doggies shay 'bow - wow' and cows 
8 Wi ~ m00 ' and little P ush y cats sa y 'meow - meow.' Now are you 

-LVC- 




ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 

207 W. Main 



Darling, I've just heard the most terrible bit of scandle. 
Ubby — I thought you had, you looked so happy when you came in. 

Ma • LVC 

gistrate — Have you seen the prisoner at the bar before? 

witness—Yes, that's where I first met him. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



„ re you the manager of this place?" 
tea." 

"I h 

"Th a serious complaint." 
pllfivS d0n>t C0Tne near m e— it might be catching." 
^| VE IT OR NOT— 

tlle Mo!! consult the stars to foretell the future. But what a story 

Som C0UM teH ° f the past 
•Hate 6 C ° Uege men have th <* knack of making friends. Others con- 

£ Fern ] 11 Women ' 

V is no r ' S f ttitu(le of isolation seems to have changed since last year. 
a *H n jr >, W d ° ing two years work in one > making up the lost time "Joe 
The - In the librar - v - 

Snls of West Hall enjoy having onion parties. 



ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue 
J Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, 
Colored Crayons and Pencils. 

All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

M South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmansh*p and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements. 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Annville - - . . Penna. 



ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 




TELEPHONED 

^Mother and "Dad 

? 






a great many voices are 

GOING HOME 

tonight! 



Tonight, just like every other night, 
there will be a great exodus of Voices — 
going from the Campus to Home! 
And there will be a grand influx of ma- 
ternal and paternal voices — visiting the 
Campus! 

It's a fair exchange, too, that brings a 
grand thrill to everyone concerned. 
Just give your home telephone number 
to the Operator and stay on the line. 
It only takes a few minutes of your time 
— and costs but little. 
(Charges may be reversed if you wish.) 





4 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE CO'.LEGIENNE, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 6 1930 



RECOVERED PUNT 
PROVIDES VICTORY 



(Continued from Page 1) 



The lineup and summary: 



Williams 
Sprenkle 
Lechthaler 
Murphy 
Kleinfelter 
Kelly 
Volkins 
Slack 
Daub 
Orsino 
M. Light 



L. E. Valibus 
L. T. Zubris 
L. G. Kennedy 
C. Ryscavage 



R. G. 
R. T. 
R. E. 
Q. B. 
L. H. B. 
R. H. B. 
F. B. 



Boggs 
Holland 

Ferbe 
Connell 
Dooley 

Tracy 

Wolfe 



Lebanon Valley 6—6 

Mt. St. Mary's 7—7 

Touchdowns — Williams, Edolon 
Point after touchdown — Connell. 

Substitutions — Lebanon Valley: 
Heller for Volkins, Reeder for Daub 
Patrizio for Orsino, Wood for Klein- 
felter, Morris for Wood, Volkins for 
Sprenkle, Wogan for Murphy, Mur- 
phy for Wogan. 

Refree— Crowley, Muhlenberg. Um- 
pire — Reagan, Villanova. Head line- 
man— Craig, Penn State. Time of 
periods — 15 minutes. 

POSITIONS FOUND BY 
CLASS OF '30 



CLIO SELECTS PLAY FOR 
ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Following is the cast chosen for 
the local production: 

Sister Joanna of the Cross 

Dorothy Garber 

(Teresa Anna Kiehl 

Priocess Elizabeth Flook 

Mistress of Novices Miriam Book 

Sister Marcella Mildred Nye 

Sister Maria Jesus Jane Muth 

Sister Sogrario .... Margaret Kohicr 

Sister Mez Mary Ann Rupp 

Sister Tornero Martha Daley 

Doctor Fred Mund 

Antonio Russell Williams 

Poet Joe Hutchison 

Vicaress Lolita Mummert 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Continued from page 2 



Course committee engages those 
speakers. Also that one doesn't 
mind sitting in Chapel instead of go- 
ing to that 9:15 class. 



And did you know that today is 
Paderewski's seventieth birthday? 



Phila., Pa.; Harold Gingrich, teaching 
science and mathmatics in W. Lam- 
peter H. S. Xampeter, Pa.; Delores 
Gregory, teaching elementary school 
at Arclen, W. Va.; Mildred Hackmm 
married A. Kurtz King, living in Un- 
ion, N. J.; Kathryn Hagner, teacher 
in H. S., Cressona, Pa.; Helen Ham 
teacher in Quarryville, Pa.; Anna 
Hershey, teaching Penns Grove, N. 
J.; George Edgar Hertzler, student at 
Bronebrake Theol. Seminary, Dayton, 
O.: Hilda Hess Supervisor of Music r 
Quincy Township, living in Waynes- 
boro, Pa.; Dorthy Heister, teeacher in 
H. S., Ringtown, P.; Elizabeth Hay 
teaching Latin in H. S. Hershey, Pa.; 
Dorothy Hyland teeacher, Hershev P 
S.; Robt. Jacks, teacher in H S., Tow 
er City Pa.; Lester Kauffman, stu 
dent, Gettysburg Seminary, pIso p-s 
tor of Carlisle Circuit (U. B.). living 
in Lemoyne, Pa.; J. Calvin Keene. 
graduate student in Divinity Sch-v° 
at Yale, New Haven. Conn.; G r d-o^ 
Keener, teacher, Hbg., P^ 1 .: GfF><" 
Keener, teaching Latin and French 
Wyommg Borough H. S., Wyoming 
Pa.; Gladys Knaub, teaching in H. S„ 
Rothsville, Pa.; Ruth March, teacher 
in H. S., Couderport. Pa.: Leah Miller 
tefcher in South Whitehall H. S. 
Allentown Pa.; Mildred Myers, teach- 
ing Latin in Annville H. S.; Wm. 
Myers, teaching Math. Tremont, Pa.: 
Clanence Noll, Student teacher, Tmn- 
ity College, Hartford, Conn.; Ruth 
Parnell, teacher in H. S., Houtzdale 
Pa.; Irene Peter, teacher m Morgan- 
town, Pa.; Mary Rank, teaching Latin 
and French in H. S., Manheim, Pa.; 
Fred Rhoads, employed by S. S 
Kresge Store Co., Lawrence, Mass.: 
Meredith Rice, teaching in Hbg. Jr 
H S., Hbg., Pa.; Madeline Rife, teach- 
er in H. S., Millersville, Pa.; Mildred 
Saylor, teacher in McVeytown, Pa.: 
Pauline Schaeffer, teacher in H. S. in 
Elizabethville, Pa.; Mary Showers 
teacher in H. S. Ringtown, Pa.; Ed- 
gar Scrayer, teacher in H. S-» Tow- 
anda, Pa.; Albert Setlinger, student 
Divinity School, Yale Univ., N. Haven 
Conn.; Alcesta Slichter, teaching priv- 
ately, Lancaster, Pa.; Margaret Smy- 
ser, teacher in H. S., Lewisburg, Pa.; 
John Snyder, teacher in H. S., Lykenb 
Pa.; Paul Stern, teacher in H. S. 
Manheim, Pa.; Mrs. Jane Stone, Sub- 
stitute teacher, Hbg., Pa.; Rernita 
Strebig, teacher of Eng. in Howard H. 
S., Howard, Center Co., Pa.; Mary 
E. Witmer, teacher, Peach Bottane, 
Pa.; Harry Zechman, pastor of Leb- 
anon Bethany United Brethren 
Church, Lebanon, Pa.; Olive Weigle 
teaching Music in Jr. H. S-» Johns- 
town, Pa. 



WHAT SOME OTHERS 
THINK OF IT 

(Continued from Page 1) 
it or not. The inability of over- 
Bnthusiastic sophomores to distin- 
guish the diagnostic symptoms of 
their hereditary enemies before ap- 
plying to them the traditional pan- 
acea for megalomaniacal egotism ju - 
tines the course taken by the Bar" 
mouth student body. 

Similar action has been taken at 
others of our more civilized institu- 
tions of higher learning. They will 
cases that need the plaster of hu- 
be the better for it. The individual 
miliation will continue to be treated 
is occasion arises; hat is the wav 
vill no longer have to suffer for ard 
vith the guilty. The toll of physical 
m;ury from reckless attempts to pu 
^freshmen in their place will be re- 
duced or abolished. Thus under- 
graduate disciplinary measures will 
become intelligently discriminatory 
as they should be. 

The ancient customs of the campus 
with respect to class dress and other 
inconsequentials need not be aban- 
doned. 



STAR COURSE PLAY 
ENJOYED BY ALL 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Irene is sorry that she ever made the 
agreement to turn over her husband 
to Emily. In order to persuade Emily 
from goin gany farther in the affair 
she attempts to make her husband 
seem fierce and attrocious. She tells 
all manner of lies about him; calls 
him a wife-beater, etc. Finally Emily 
has enough and agrees not to take 
him. At this point Richard walks in 
and hears that his sister has been 
brutally treated by her husband. 
Wishing to aid her, he threatens to 
to harm her husband to protect her. 

Finally after much trouble and side 
play by the Uncle the thing is ex- 
plained to Richard and he is sat- 
isfied that it was all a big joke. 
Stuart wishes to teach his wife a les- 
son so he plays the part of the sick 
man. She forgets her own false sick- 
ness and declares that she is cured. 

Richard is finally reunited to his 
old sweetheart Emily as is Irene to 
her husband. All ends with Irene as 
"Her Husband's Wife." 

The play was very well acted and 
the vast difference between Emily 
the old maid and Emily the inter- 
veled wife is astonishing. The play 
is well worth note for its story is a 
human one. 

Don't forget John E. Bocewitz on 
Dec. 16 is the advice of the Com- 
mittee. 




H. GOODMAN & SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

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Real Way- 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



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Lebanon, Pa. 



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AT MODERATE PRICES 

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LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



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NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
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Prices : 

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L. V. C. Representatives 
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PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



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OF QUALITY 

Annville ... p a . 



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VOLUME VII 



AXNVILLE, PEXNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1930 



No. 7 



Blue and White Takes Successive Victories 



QOVTRNMErtT REQUIRES 
RIFLE CLUB TO DISBAND 



The Rifle Club of Lebanon Valley has 
passed out of existence. On account 
f the club's failure to join the Na- 
tional Rifle Association last year, the 
government recently demanded that 
the lifles be returned. 

The failuie to join the association 
cannot be attributed to any single per- 
son, but to the club as a whole;! be- 
cause last year they decided that in 
order to save mcney and since we did 
not have enough good "shots" to war- 
rent cur competing with other club:., 
the club voted to stay out of the as- 
sociation 

The guns have been returned and 
the arsenal has been cleaned out. 
There is therefore no Rifle club at 
L. V. C, for such is decree of dear 
old "Uncle Sam." 

SUDDEN DEATH 
SHOCKS CAMPUS 

CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE 
FATAL TO BERNICE 
RAIMON 



On Wednesday, November 12, Leb- 
anon Valley College was sadly shock- 
ed when it was announced that Misr 
Bernice Raimen had been found life- 
less in her room in North Hall. Not 
one-half hour before she had been seen 
moving about preparing for an ex- 
amination. 

Bernice, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank B. Raimon of Elizabeth. 

J., was a very popular member of 
the Freshman class and was 19 years 
of age. 

The exact cause of her death is not 
known. The physicians who examined 
"le body were reported to have as- 
signed a possible cause of death as a 
Ce rebral hemorrhage, and this state- 
ment was corroborated by the death 

* rt ificate, wherein the death was re- 
c °rded as caused by an embolism. 

The funeral services were held Sat- 
urday afternoon at the home of the 
par ents. Dr. R. R. Butterwick, one 
of the representatives of the faculty 
* p °ke at. the services, both a':, the 
.° m e and at the grave. Accompany- 
In S him, Madame Green, Prof. 

w>kes and Bernice's room-mate. Mi?? 

e len Line, '34, acted as representa- 

1Ves from the faculty and student 

body. 

^ ne incident created quite a stir 

a !J l0n 5? the students as well as outs ! d- 
c iti Ze , 



The 



en s in the vicinity of Annville 
hidden nature of the infection 
e caused Miss Rpimon's deceas? 
^ led her to present the appearance 
al most perfect health, and the sud- 
a ess with which the blow fell lnf* 
students totallv unprepared for 
an incident. This was especially 
Hfe ln v * ew of her popularity and 

pledged beauty, 
of ^ e Sc 'hool mates and many fr'end' 
m Raimon extend to h?r parent 1 " 
re iatives their deepest sympathy 



s uch 

V. 



MYLINMEN 32; 
WASHINGTON 

"GUS" DAUB STARS IN 
SPECTACULAR LINE 
PLUNGING 



'Gus" Daub was the outstanding 
player in the Washington game. Time 
ifter time he took the ball for gains- 
of ten yards or so. He made the 
first point after touchdown when find- 
ing no one to pass the ball to, he ran 
it across the line. A few minutes later 
he made the most spectacular run of 
the game, 60-yards for a touchdown. 
That ended his play for the day as 
Mylin kept in substitutes the remain- 
der of the game. 

I "Pete"Kandrat, substitute right end 
made the first score on a pass from 
Daub. With the ball on Washington's 
thirty yard line he caught a shor'. 
toss and ran the remainder of thr 
distance. 

; The score would undoubtedly have 
been larger if the varsity would have 
played the full game. Many substi- 
tutes saw action and all of them play- 
ed well. 

• Max Light, Feeser . and "Scotty" 1 
Abrams were the other men to scorr 
six pointers. Light also added th<~ 
extra point after touchdown by rush- 
ing the ball across. 

The one redeeming feature of Wash 
ington's game was the fine brand of 

Continued on Page 4) 



EURYDICE CHORAL CLUI 
CONDUCTS REHEARSAL! 



The Euryd^e Choral Club is prac- 
+jsing twice a week preparatory to 
the seasons engagement*. Bes-'d^s 
the old Eurydice members the re- 
hearsals this year are attended fr- 
ill public school music students, sincp 
a four year college glee club tr-in- 
ihg is now required for a degree. 
Twenty of the best voices of this 
group will be selected to go on all 
trips. Through the efforts of the bus- 
iness manager, Hester Thompson, ar 
engagement has already b^en secur- 
ed to present a concert in Washigton 
D. C, and prospects for several 
others are in view. .... 
I The officers of the club are Presi- 
dent, Dorothp Hofer; vice-president 
Margaret Young, secretary-treasurer 
Caroline Fisher; business manager 
Hester Thompson, and assistant bus- 
iness manager, Kathryn Lutz. 

IMPROVED DRINKING 

FOUNTAIN INSTALLED 



A much-needed improvement in the 
form of a medern-type drinking foun- 
tain was recently instated in f h^ 
main hall of the Administration 
Building. The Administration seems 
*jo be determined to spare no pains in 
proucing a bigger and better L. V. C. 



MEDICAL MISSIONARY 

SPEAKS IN CHAPEL 



Chapel exercises were conducted 
% m Wednesday morning by Dr. Con- 
nor, a medical missionary of the 
United Bretheren in Christ.- Church 
in the province of Siena Leon, West 
Africa. Dr. Connor's brief address 
dealt mainly with the opportunities 
£Or rendering useful service in the 
Various professions, and particularly 
in the mirsion field. He stressed the 
necessity of preparation that is broad 
.as well as thorough. 

Later in the day, Dr. Connor con- 
ferred with the heads of the local 
Life Work Recruits as well as - with 
many of the missionary and minis- 
terial students. He offered some fine 
suggestions for meeting the various 
problems of these groups. 



KALO-DELPHIAN 
JOINTSESSION 

CLOSED SESSION POLICY 
IS GIVEN A 
TRIAL 



j The Kalo-Delphian joint session 
last week inaugurated the new closed 
session policy recently adopted- by 
the societies on the campus and it 
was considered a great success. 

| The meeting was opened by a few 
words cf welcome from Kalo's presi- 
dent, Russell Morgan. He then in- 
troduced Alexander Grant the master 
of ceremonies. "Ike" kept the crowd 
laughing with his continual flow of 
"wise cracks" and appropriate "side- 
sipliters." Kalo's orchestra then 
rlendered a series of popular selec- 
tions. This was the orchestra's first 
appearance this year and they are 
considered the pride and joy of Kalo. 
AH through the program they kept 
lip the Kalo spirit — they were "al- 
ways on the go". The next number 
Was a clever presentation of song 
and dance by the Campus Sweet- 
hearts — Babe and Marion. This 
number was collegiate in all respects 
and made a big hit with the crowd. 
Kalo's ccmedians. Messrs. Speg and 
Kiumbiegel then brought the crowd 
to their feet with a "talented presen- 
Continued on Page 4) 



i "college calendar 



Friday — Nov. 21 — Regular Lit- 
erary Meetings 
Saturday— Nov. 22— Clio's 60th 
Anniversary Propram 
"The Cradle Song" 
Sunday — Nov. 23 — Friendly 

Hour 5:45 
Wednesday— Nov. 26— Thanks- 
giving Recess Begins 
Thursday — No. 27 — Game with 
Albright 



TROUNCES JUNIATA GRIDMEN 22-6 

LEE STONE SCORES FIRST ) FIELD-GOAL MADE FOR 
LEBANON VALLEY IN j NUMBER OF YEARS 
FINE TEAM WORK SHOWN BY PLAYERS 



; After swamping Washington College 
32-0, "Hooks" Mylih's Blue and White 
eileven took their second • successive 
victory and the third of the year by 
beating Juniata 22-6 last Saturday at 
Huntingdon; ' ' '" 

• The team has hit its stride and will 
go to Reading" next Thursday with a 
determination to beat Albright. Al- 
though Albright will ' start the game 
a favorite, local fans will not be sur- 
prised with" a' clean cut Lebanon Val 
ley triumph, '■ - 

For the first half Juniata fought 
L. V. oh equal terms but could hot 
keep the pace in the second half. The 
visitors were first to score when after 
Steady gains Daub went over' the goal 
!me cn' a lateral pass play. Lee Stone 
pjut over ~si perfect placement kick 
fpr the extra point. 1 . - ■•- 

| In the second period ' Juniata stag- 
ed an aerial" offensive that was" good 
fjor a touchdown. The -climax was a 
p|ass from Andrews to Lig-ht who took 
tfhe balb over for the six-pointer. 

j The second half was- all Lebanon 
Valley's. Consistent gains by Dau- 
4nd Slack put the ball in -scoring- posi- 

i .. . . . . . ■ . 

rljEWLY FORMED "P- J" 

CLUB HOLDS MEETING 



| Exactly on the stroke - of eight- 
o'clock on Monday night. November 
17th, ten little hungry girls of- South 
Ijlall sat down at a huge table laden 
■\jvith appetizing and luscious eatables 
Exactly on the stroke of nine o'clock 
ten little ( ?.) girls painfully rose frorr; 

table sadly "unladen," with the dish^ 
es stripped of their former glory. The 
L-Vetians heaved sighs of" satisfac- 
tion which rarely '-occur after other 
jepasts. 

| It was a most glorious feast. Three 
chickens went down under the slaugh- 
ter, but not alone did they go — for 
they were, accompanied by juicy, to- 
matoes, tender hearts of celery, pipimr 
hot soup, crispy saltines, golden brown 
p otatoe chips, 1 spicy relish, rosy apples 
fich apple pie garnished with' ice 
cream flaky angel food cake, and last 
put not least "eidery" cider. It was 
most too much, but they managed, 
and how ! 

; It was the first meeting of the newly 
formed "P-J" Club of South Hall, but 
hot the last .by any means. Their 
motto is "eat" their password is "eat" 
and their flower — the celery plant. 
They predict a big. year ahead and 
from all reports the season started 
fine. . . 

: Those present were: Billie Coleman, 
Dorothy Ferry, Gladys Hershey, T.rula 
Koch, Marian Kruger, Gloria La- 
VanUrc, Harriet Miller, Ruth Shroyev 
Dorothy Slater and' Gussie Trachte. 



tiion, while Wogan, Heller, and Stone 

Starred in the line. 

1 -, .- . L _ u .. ■, 

[ Heller scored the next touchdown via 
\he aerial route." He grabbed one of 
Daub's passes on the five-yard line 
^nd ran over the final chalk line. Stone 
hiissed that extra point. However a 
few minutes later' he came through 
with Lebanon Valley's first field goal 
|or a number of years. Standing on 
|he 20-yard mark he kicked a neat 
placement over the bars for three 
points. The last score was made by 
Patrizio in the fourth quarter after 
a steady march down the field. 
| "Joe" Volkin joined "Russ" Will- 
iams on the injured list with a should- 
er injury similar to William's. It was 
found that neither one , had any bones 
broken and both boys, expect to play 

Continued on Page 4) 



EDITOR MARRIED 
WHILE ON TRIP 

i 

TAKES TOUR THROUGH 
SOUTH AND NORTH 
WEST 



When the campus was knee deep in 
examination meditation, our editor- 
in-chief, Russell Etter, casually took 
a vacation and performed the unex- 
pected by tying the matrimonial 
knot. The news was a complete sur- . 
prise to the student body in so much 
as no one ever expected bur busy 
student-preacher to take steps in this 
direction. However, he has returned 
to us and is again back in his former 
schedule. If bustling activity is an in- 
dication of progress, we can consider 
him greatly benefited by his exper- 
ience. 

The bride was formerly Miss L. 
Kathryn Miller of Campbelltown, the 
daughter, of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Miller. The bridal party, which in-' 
tluded the bride's parents and sister, 
and Mr. Seltzer, of Hershey, left . on 
Sunday, November 2 on an extended 
tour of ten of the southern and north 
central states. The ceremony wals 
performed on Monday, November 3 
in Knoxville, Tenn. Returning home 
on November 9, the newly weds took 
up their residence at the home of the 
bride where they will remain for the 
present. 

.The campus congratulates our 
newest addition to the ranks, and 
extends the heartiest wishes for a 
happy journey. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, *31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

REPOBTORIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Madeline Sheddy, '31 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keehe, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the' Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



A PARABLE 



Hear ye now the parable of a foot- 
ball team. 

Behold, the team went forth to win 
victories, and by reason of hinder- 
ances on every hand, it returned, 
bringing with it the tail end of the 
score. 

But not many days afterward, be- 
cause of much hard labor and dili 
gence in practice, the team went forth 
as at other times, and lo! it was suc- 
cessful and did bring home the bacon. 

Now there were in that same coun- 
try, school-mates abiding, jealously 
keeping watch over the honor of their 
Alma Mater. And when they heard 
the results of the games, they began 
to murmur amongst themselves, say- 
ing. 

"Who are these false-alarms and 
whence came they? Can they not sc 
much as win a single game ? 

"Behold, it was not so in former 
years. And as for these victories 
they are but small fry; we desire the 
bigger fish for our feast. 

"Come, now, and let us hoot th- 
team. Let us not support them at thr 
gomes ncr come out to pep meeting • 

"But let us run around the campur 
and chide them with shouting the 
names of their rivals. 

"And although we know not how to 
encourage them let us ride them, for 
is not that the right school spirit?" 

Verily, verily I say unto you. Ex- 
cept this foolish and perverse genera- 
tion repent and change its ways, tha* 
team will go down in defeat. 

Him that hath ears to hear let him 
hear. 



AFTER-MATH 



Now that exams are over and we 
have had the necessary week's time 
for recovery we can again resume our 
normal manner of life. My how se- 
cure we do feel for another six or 
eight weeks at any rate. We've pass- 
ed our exams, some of us at least, and 
wasn't that what we were working 
for? Oh, to be sure, that attitude 
lis not the most fitting one, according 
to the best principles of educational 
procedure, but why try to pass the 
buck? Facts are facts, and in this 
case they show quite conclusively that 
with very rare exceptions, everyone's 
objective is to "get by" the exams. 

The wrong outlook? Perhaps. But 
haven't the instructors used these ver; 
tests as a grand bug-a-boo with which 
to enforce our attention to our 
studies ? And haven't we, through our 
negligence, our happy-go-lucky atti- 



tude, made such a bug-a-boo neces- 
sary? 

Well, it's all over now until semes- 
ter exams come round. Then another 
period of cramming, excitement, worry 
and all the rest of it. Inevitable? No 
doubt. But we would certainly wel- 
come as a benefactor someone who 
would banish forever the idea that 
"the exam is the principal thing, 
therefore pass the exam, yea, with all 
the ability pass the test, for by so do- 
ing thou shalt acquire an appearance 
of wisdom, and everyone will take it 
for granted that thou art educated." 



SWORDS AND 



PLOWSHARES 



With the passing of Armistice Day, 
we have brought to our attention the 
ever-recuring problem of world 
peace. "And they shall beat their 
swords into plowshares — "throughout 
Cristendom the words of the old 
prophet echo and re-echo. The pulpit, 
the lecture platform, the soap-box it- 
erate and reiterate the principle that 
ihe era of peace has dawned. But in 
che midst of the merrymaking the 
mumblings of wars break upon us 
with their discordant sounds, as Italy 
rattles the saber at France and the 
republics of Latin America engage in 
a free for all hair pulling contest. 

Too modest are we to attempt to 
add to the volumes without end that 
nave been written upon this subject. 
We would merely desire to ask a few 
questions. 

First, is our self-complaint optim- 
ism in view of the present state 01 
international relations well founded, 
or are we really closing our eyes to 
the facts, shouting "Peace ! Peace!" 
where there is no peace, and inviting 
'sudden destruction" to come upon us ? 

In the second place, is the estab- 
lishment of World Peace so simple an 
atfair that oratory and treaty-sign- 
ing alone can solve the problem i 
What consideration is to be given to 
che problems of commercial competi- 
tion, over expansion of population, 
differences between nations in stand- 
ards of living, and the like? 

And finally, would it not be most 
wise for us all to assume a more cool- 
headed, reverent, and less boisterou 
and boastful attitude toward this 
great task? 




One thousand new workmen were 
added to the payroll of the Hudson 
Motor Car Company this week. This 
makes a total of 3500 new men in the 
past three weeks. 



With the discovery of a Red plot 
in Cuba, all American property has 
been put under special guard. A 
large police guard has been stationed 
around the American Embassy at 
Havana. 



After three days of riot and dis- 
order the general stride in Madrid is 
coming to an end. On account of the 
strike bakers had not been working, 
stores were closed and transporta- 
tion was lacking. The wounded from 
the food riots thus brought on were 
numerous. 

The Barcelona cavalry of the regular 
army was ordered into action and 
heavy guards of soldiers patrolled 
the entire city. 

Labor riots have become so serious 
that King Alfonso has returned from 
his hunting trip, though he was not 
sent for by those left in authority. 



Mrs. Henry W. Peabody, of Bev- 
erly, Mass.; chairman of the National 
Women's Committee for Law En- 
forcement, has indicated that she will 
move from Massachusetts because 
the State Prohibition Enforcement 
Law had been repealed. She does 
not care to live in an "outlaw state." 



Sinclair Lewis has been awarded 
the Nobel prize for literature, ac- 
cording to announcements from 
Stockholm. This has brought the 
Nobel prize in literature to the Un- 
ited States for the first time since 
the award was established twenty- 
nine years ago. The money value of 
the award is $46,350; a greater a- 
mount than in any previous year. 



The German flying boat DO-X, 
largest seaplane in the world is pre- 
paring an ocean flight to New York. 
Plans are being made to leave Lis- 
bon, Spain, about the middle of Nov- 
ember. 



Edith Wharton, novelist, has be- 
come the only living woman member 
of the American Academy of Arts 
and Letters. 



Bobby Jones, 28 year old conquer- 
or of golfdom, has given up his am- 
ateur standing and is retiring from 
all championship competition. He has 
signed a contract with Warner Bros, 
to make twelve one reel motion pic- 
tures on educational golfing subjects. 



Baron Shidehara, Foreign Minister 
of Japan, has temporarily taken over 
the reigns of government. Premier 
Hugo Hamagwchi is struggling to 
recover from a pistol wound that was 
inflicted by a reactionary at Tokio. 
He is reported as improving. 




L. V. C.'s offense clicked against 
Washington College and Juniata Col- 
lege and as a result we ran up the 
largest scores we've made in recen 1 
years. 33 points against Washing- 
ton and 22 against Juniata. 



Williams, a star wingman, was in- 
jured in the Washington game and 
we regret to say he will be out for 
the rest of the season. His collar- 
bone was broken early in the game 
after he had made several beautiful 
tackles. 



Joe Volkins, another Frosh lumin- 
ary, was injured in the Juniata til'*. 
His shoulder was badly bruised bu' 
we expect to see him in his togs 
again for the Albright tilt. 



"Gus" Daub surely did show Wash- 
ington how it was done in the Coal 
region. That was a nice run "Gus". 
The boys from Chestertown are still 
wondering how Daub got over that 
60 yards of "terra firma" so rapid- 
ly. 



Scoop Feeser lived up to the expecta- 
tions of his home towners and made 
several nice runs. He scored a touch- 
down on a beautiful line crash. 



Peter Kandrat, the Athletic Vale- 
dictorian, drew first blood against 
Washington College when he picked 
Light's pass out of the air and gal- 
loped the intervening twenty yards. 
Nice goig Pete — you gave the boys 
the start. 



"Scotty" Abrams and Pete Slack, 
the two Sunbury lads, continued their 
good work. Slack put the ball in 
scoring position for the last touch- 
down and Abrams plunged it over. 



Albright continued their winning 
streak Saturday by trouncing George 
Washington University, 33-0. Looks 
like the Turkey Day tilt is going to be 
a real battle. Albright has lost to 
only one team this year and that was 
Bucknell the conqueror of Gettysburg 
and Penn State. 



Springfield College continued their 
winning streak. The only team able 
to halt tht Y. M. C. A. boys this year 
was Harvard. We play Springfield 
again next year — Let's hope we turn 
tables on them. 



Haines and Hatton are two Al- 
bright boys that will cause plenty of 
trouble unless they are watched. Both 
are credited with two or more touch- 
downs in the majority of Albright 
tilts. 



The fighting southerners traveling 
as Davis-Elkins football team lost to 
fast charging Albright eleven in the 
last few minutes of play. They say 
it was a "break" in the game but r 
team has to make "breaks" and then 
take advantage of them. Let's be on 
our toes gang — We must beat Al- 
bright. 



The team has a rest Saturday in 
preparation for the Thanksgiving Day 
game. The Ftfosh and Sophs will 
tangle on the local playing field in 
their annual gridiron classic. It prom- 
ises to be a real fight. Come out and 
cheer for your choice — you'll never re- 
gret the loss of that few minutes. 



Stone proved to Juniata that L. v 
C. specialized in "plain and fancy' 
football when he booted a field goal 
from the twelve yard line in thei 
third period. He also kicked the! 
first extra point L. V. C. has made 
this season "via" the place-kick 



Heller shook off a couple of would- 
be tacklers when he scooped Daub's 
pass out of the air for our third touch- 
down against Juniata. I wonder what 
that funny smile on Cal's face meant "i 



And have you added our scores in 
the last two football games and com- 
pared them with the points made on 
us? Not half bad eh, wot? 54 to 6. 
Wonder if the Albright crew is still 
cocky ? 



Now that the Sophs and Frosh are 
practising for their annual football 
game speculation is ripe. The Frosh 
have quite a few varsity men and a 
mess of former High-School lumin- 
aries but then the Sophs have Clem- 
ents. 

Let's all go to Reading so we can 
have something to be thankful for be- 
cause we are going to win and the 
team needs the backing of all stu- 
dents, alumni and friends. 



Don't forget our war cry. Beat Al- 
bright! 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Well the La Vie missed a week and 
gave us a chance to get some news 
together. And of course there's al- 
ways the guy who says, "Oh yeah, is 
that news?" 



The acute observer will have notic- 
ed that we warned the Frosh co-eds 
of the Ides of November in the last 
issue of this paper. Evidently the 
warning was not heeded. But who 
believes in soothsayers anyway. 



Eva Peck pulled a faux pas (p af 
done mio la franzosich) the other day 
Someone asked her what football 
game she was going to see. Replj eg 
Eva very naively, "Oh, I'm going ^ 
see the Navy play Annapolis, 
won?" 



And Minna Wolfskeil '34 is wonder 
ing how it is that she took exams i r 
high school to get out of school an* 
here she is taking them to stay j n 
school. Will somebody please hint fa 
her that we too are wondering how ft 
is, why it is and couldn't it be other- 
wise? 



There seem to be two words i n 
our slanguage (apologies to the prop- 
er party) that are rather conspicuous 
by their absence. They are jockey 
and lady-killer. At least we have not 
heard them used much on the campus 
and we wonder why. Surely there's 
plenty of riding done and enough of 
the Vallee-Valentino stuff to warrant 
their usage. Are they distasteful or 
are we above that? Who threw that 
tomatoe ? 



Of course we must say something 
about exams. How did you make 
out ? Not so good ? That's great er- 
a-uhum we mean that's too bad, of 
course. Yes fine weather we're hav- 
ing? Oh, you say it's raining. Yes, 
too bad of course. And you made 
SIX A's! Oh yes I thought that the 
exams were very easy too. Well 
these snap courses. Oh, none of your 
courses are snap courses ? Really that 
should gc* into the La Vie. (s. i. 
what system did you see?) s. i. equal 
Strange Interlude. 



At last the Great Spuggy III claws 
the dirt. His brilliance no longer 
shines forth at night like an electric 
light illuminating all surrounding ob- 
jects. Alas and alack he too has sunk 
to the depths. He is only an object. 
For details see Schrope or Krumbie- 
gel. 



Have you noticed that Jim Montieth 
dances with his eyes closed. Oh he's 
a dilly. (Suggested by P. B.) 

Well, boys, the price of flowers 
hasn't come down any as yet. Why 
not wait until after the Anniversary 
and get them at half price. 



We wonder why Kinney is leaving 
us Friday. Surely he doesn't want 
to miss the Clio Anniversary. 



Ike Grant tried to pull a "R* 1 .' 
Grange by opposing the Sophomore 
football line alone. Needless to say 
he is still wondering what happened- 



The disciples of Terpsichore shoal 
give a vote of thanks to the Junwj 
class for their party in the Gym- 
surely was appreciated. Also it ' s 
hoped that the other classes will taK e 
the hint. 



Then again Krumjbiegel tries to 



tell 



us that his pump- handle dancing 
the "Carolina Wiggle." We wonder 
he ever saw Carolina. 



an- 



That good old fraternal spirit 

. , „ t i n the 

noys roommates is quite evident 

Zech vs. Goodman case. Goodman^ 
seems, is the better Biology artist 



Zech admits the temptation to 
foul methods in order to defeat 
roommate. 



us 
his 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 1930 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' 



-Jonathan Swift. 



Visitor — Are you an old settler here? 

Jimsonweed — Yep; I kin remember when there used to be as much as 
hundred feet between billboards. 

LVC 



Kinney — "I'd marry Gertrude but for one thing." 
Shorty — "Afraid to pop the question?" 
Kinney — "No, afraid to question pop." 

LVC 



Beautiful Gem 
Priceless Gem 
When shadows fall 
O'er West Hall 

I dream sweet dreams of you 
Hoping they all come true. 

McCusker. 

LVC 



Etter — The first time I smoked a cigar after we were married my wife 
fainted. i 
Moose — What did you do ? 
Etter — I smoked another before she came to. 

—LVC 



Lichty — Have you seen the Widow's Home. 

Salada — I did once and it cost me a couple of star course tickets. 
LVC 

Reeder — We're giving a show for the benefit of the widows. Buy a 
ticket? 

Lehman — Naw. They've got more show now than the single ones. 

LVC 

Mary K. Goshert — Do you know the "Barber of Seville?" 
Frank — No. I shave myself. 

— LVC 

Prof. Behney — When is baseball first mentioned in the Bible? 
Fake — When Rebecca took a pitcher to the well. 

LVC 

"I have often marvelled at your brilliancy, your aptness at repartee, 
your—" 

"If it's more than a dollar, old man. I can't do a thing for you. I'M 
nearly broke myself." 

LVC 

Wife — John, mother was so pleased with all those nice things you said 
about her in your letter to me. She opened it by mistake. 
Hubby — Yes. I thought she would. 

LVC 

"Why did you wake me out of a sound sleep." 
"Because the sound was too loud." 

LVC 

Pretzel — Can you drive seventy in your car ? 
Corker — No, it's only a coupe. 

LVC 

Gallant Guests — May I sit on your right hand? 

Hostess— No, I'll have to eat with that. You'd better take a chair. 

LVC ■ 

Hubby found some holes in his sox. 

"You haven't mended these?" he said to his wife. 

"Did you buy that coat you promised me?" she asked. 

"No." 

"Well, if you don't give a wrap, I don't f?ive a darn." 

ta LVC 

Bel 



»eve it or not 

There was an ancient adage in 1927, "Give Monteith the ball." 



Clements thinks tea. parties are just the thing. 



Secret marriages are becoming the fad in the Senior class. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



Philo held its regular literary meet- 
ing on Friday, Nov ,y (i ber 7. After ih,« 
meeting was called to order by th" 
president, t'arl WC devotions w»i- 
conducted by Chester Goodman. 

The program was both musical and 
litcr?ry. Paul Keene and Chester 
Gccdman Bang two duets entitled, "Old 
New England Moon," and "Confessing 
I Love Ycu." These were enjoyed by 
all. John Hughes then grve a talk on 
"Living Thoughts." With his usu,\\ 
pep and vo.ubility he presented a few 
jokes, some practical thoughts, and 
several suggestions for the good of 
the society. 

The literary session was followed 
by a business meeting. Eleven fresh- 
men were given the first degree and 
were welcomed into Philo. They were 
DeWitt M. Essick, D. Dwight Grove, 
J. Mitchell Jordan, H. Algire McFaul, 
Clyde S. Mentzer, Joseph Rhen, Don- 
ald R. Shope, Richard S. Slaybaugh, 
Kenneth S. Whisler, and John D. Zcch. 
Others who have pledged themselves 
to join Philo will be given the first 
degree later. 

Officers for the next term of office 
were then elected as follows: Presi- 
dent, Charles Wise; vice-president, 
Fred W. Munmund; corresponding sec- 
retary, Chester Goodman; recording 
ecretary, Samuel Ulrich; pianist, War- 
ren Lebo; critic, Earl Wolf; chaplain. 
Stuart Werner; chairman of execu- 
tive committee, Robert Rawhauser; 
and sergeants at arms, John Zech, 
Kenneth Whistler and John A. Ranck. 



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THE THRILL 

lasts for days! 

Those voices from Home will ring in 
your ears for days to come, and help 
to brighten up the longest lecture, 
or the dullest evening. 

Make a telephone date with the folks 
at home, for a certain evening every 
week — and bring a touch of home 
to the campus. 

It's easy to make the call — just give 
the Operator your home telephone 
number, and stay on the line. 

It costs but little — and, if you like, 
charges may be reversed. 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1930 



TROUNCES JUNIATA 

GRIDMEN 22-6 



(Continued from Page 1) 



against Albright. 

The summary: 
(3)— L. V. C. 
Lebanon Valley 
Thrush L. E. 

Stone L. T. 

Lechthaler L. G. 

Wogan C 
J. Wood R. G. 

Kelly R. T. 

Stewart R. E. 

Patrizio Q. B. 

S. Light H. B. 

Orsino H. B. 

Daub F. B. 



Juniata 
Light 
Holsinger 
Howe 
Jamison 
Reber 
Berket 
TalasKi 
Andrews 
Petit 
Cook 
Harley 



Lebanon Valley 7 9 6—22 

Juniata 6 0—6 

Touchdowns — Daub, Light, Heller, 
Patrizio. Point after touchdown — 
Stone. Field goal — Stone. Substitu- 
tions — Lebanon Valley: Morris for 
Wood, Volkin for Kelly, Stone, Heller 
for Stewart, Reeder for Daub, Kline- 
felter for Morris Sprenkle for Volkin, 
Daub for Reeder, Abrams for Daub 
Stewart for Thrush, Slack for Light. 

Referee — Craig, Penn State. Um- 
pire — Beck, Penn State. Head lines- 
man — Wilsbach, Bucknell. 



MYLINMEN 32; 

WASHINGTON 



(Continued from Page 1) 



kicking shown by Gainer. His puntr 
made up for many of Lebanon Valley'f 
gains during the game. 
Lebanon Valley Juniata 
Williams L. E. Gamber 

Stone L. T. Dwyrr 

Lechthaler L. G. Freeny 

Murphy C Sherkey 

Wood R. G. Dickerson 

Kelly R. T. Phillips 

Kandrat R. E. Gainer 

Slack Q. B. Rob'nson 

S. Light H. B. Dobkins 

Abrams H. B. Dean 

Daub F. B. Plummer 

Lebanon Valley 13 13 6—32 

Washington 0—0 

Touchdowns — Kandrat, Daub, M 
Light, Feeser, Abrams. Points after 
Touchdowns — Daub, M. Light. 

Substitutions — Lebanon Valley — 
Thrush for Williams, Volkins for Kan- 
drat, Sprenkle for Stone, Morris for 
Wood, Klinefelter for Lechthaler, Pat- 
rizio for Slack, Max Light for 
Abrams, Stewart for Daub, Feeser for 
S. Light, Brown for Klinefelter, Or- 
sino for M. Light, Abrams for Or- 
sino, Stone for Sprenkle, Klinefelter 
for Brown, Frey for Murphy, Heller 
for Volkins. 



KALO — (DELPHIAN 

JOINT SESSION 



(Continued from Page 1) 



tation of . athletic stunts. Their cos- 
tumes consisted of basketball trunks 
shoulder pads, and head gears — a 
very appropriate lay out for this 
twpe of diversion. Misses "Gem" 
Genimel and Leona Allen then gave a 
series of popular musical selections. 
Miss Allen with her crooning voice 
was accompanied by Miss Gemmel 
"Jerry" White, Kalo's mellow voiced 
crooner rendered several delightful 
numbers. "Corker" Reeder then iav- 
ored with his old reliable "Tiger 
Rag." "Corker" was the whole or- 
chestra and your should have heard 
him growl! 

After the program music was fur- 
nished for dancing by the orchestra. 
Bridge and other card games made 
it possible for all attenmg to have 
an enjoyable evening. Refreshments 
consisting of ice-course were ser- 
ved during a brief intermission after 
which dancing was resumed. As the 
time flew by the evening became 
more lively. The music became fast- 
er, the dancing more graceful but at 
the stroke of eleven the last strains 
of "Bye Bye Blues" brought the mer- 
riment to a close. Long will the 
echoes of this joyous gathering ring 
in old Kalo Hall. 



topic. Paul Evancoe summarized the 
discussions on H. G. Wells in a force- 
ful and interesting presentation of 
several current magazine topics he had 
brought to light on the author with 
comments on his work. 



FIRST AND SECOND YEAR 
MEN PREPARE FOR MATCH 



READERS DISCUSS THE 

WORKS OF H. G. WELLS 



Y. W. NOTES 



Due to mid-semester examinations 
and also to the large number of ab- 
sentees at the usual "Friendly Hour" 
services on Sundays, November 11 
and 16, the programs of the past two 
weeks were limited to brief devo- 
tional ones. The singing of hymns, 
the reading of the scripture lesson, 
and prayer constituted the whole of 
these Y. W. services. Both meetings 
though brief, were not without a pur- 
pose; they served as inspirational 
moments for all present. 



On Tuesday evening, November 18, 
the Reader's Club met at the home of 
Dr. Wallace at 7 o'clock, to discuss, 

lisect, and dispatch H. G. Wells. A 
very interesting program had been ar- 

anged by the committee, but two 
scheduled to appear during the course 

)f the program failed to be present 
so that the discussions of the books 
"True Machine" and "The Wonderful 
visit" were not included. Neverthe- 
less, those who remained faithful to 
the end were well prepared and a de- 
lightful evening's entertainment en- 
sued. 

Arline Heckrote in her dissentation 
on his book "Marriage" revealed much 
jf his interesting views and opinions 
on this subject which were quite wall 
received by her auditors. Miss Heck- 
rote showed fine discrimination in her 
election of details to be presented. 
Next was a most interesting review 
->n his work, "Ann Veronica" rendered 
by Marie Gelwicks who handled the 
book exceedingly well and gave a de- 
'ig-htful character sketch which those 
present could almost visualize. Rob- 
ert Eshleman in his presentation of 
^he "Outline of History" was at his 
best. He had prepared his talk most 
thoroughly and as always, delighted 
the audience with his "neat turns, 
of language" and his unique personal 
'nterpretations. In the review of 
'Research Magnificient" which Edward 
Shellenberger presented in his usual 
clear, illustrated manner which never 
fails to retain the attetion of his lis- 
teners; he cordially expressed his 
opinion that the book was most diffi- 
cult to explain, and that the reading 
of it had been most laborious. Despite 
this fact, he made a good job of his 



Saturday afternoon on the College 
Athletic Field the Freshmen and 
Sophomores get together in the an- 
nual interclass football battle. All 
pregame indications point to a hard- 
fought and close contest. 

As in previous years, the Freshmen 
are favored to win due to a number 
of them having had training on the 
varsity squad. This experience has 
always proved valuable to the Frosh 
in the past as they have consistently 
beaten the Sophs. The lone exception 
in the last few years was last year 
when a scoreless tie resulted after 
forty minutes of piay. 

Both teams have been practising 
hard all week for the fray. The main 
activity is getting some offensive 
plays to present against the oppon- 
ent. The boys must get into shape 
without scrimmage since no football 
equipment is available for practice. 

"Bob" Schaak has charge of the 
Sophomore team. He has some heavy 
material for the line as well as some 
fast running backs. 

The Freshman team is being coach- 
ed by Shortlidge with Salek as his 
assistant. The Frosh have more ma- 
terial available then their rivals at 
the present the starting lineup is un- 
cerain. However a good game is ex- 
pected when the two teams clash. 




Mr. Charles Fink, '30 has obtained 
a position with the Kresge Company 
and is at present stationed in Patter- 
son, New Jersey. 



The fololwing are changes made in 
Pastorates, of the United Brethren 
Church of alumni of L. V. C. Walter 
E. Deibler, from Lebanon Memorial 
to Highspire; Harry W. Zechman, '30, 
to Lebanon Bethany; Mark H. We:*, 
to Philadelphia First Church; C. R. 
Longenecker from Cleona to Reading 
Zion; Clarence Ulrich sent to Shoe- 
makersville, Pa.; Raymond Tyson 
from Sanders Pa., to Bendersville, Pa. 
Frank E. Stine, Boonsboro, Md., from 
Gettysburg; DeWi£t Zuse to Frederick, 
Md.; Paul O. Shettle to Shipepnsburg, 
Penna. 



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LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

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OUR SLOGAN 
IS: 

BEAT ALBRIGHT! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



WE HOPE 
YOU ENJOY 
THE TURKEY 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, THANKSGIVING, 1930 



No. 8 



Clionians Observe Their Sixtieth Anniversary 



INTEREST CENTERS AROUND PLAY 



SIERRA'S "CRADLE SONG/' IN TRANSLATION, 
SKILLFULLY PRESENTED. ENJOYABLE 
SOCIAL HOUR FOLLOWS PLAY 



IS 



The Glionian Literary Society suc- 
cessfully close its sixtieth year with 
a very pleasing program presented in 
Engle Conservatory, Saturday even- 
ing, November 22. 

Before the rise of the curtain, Miss 
Lucille Shenk, gave the invocation, 
after which Miss Marie Ehrgott, as 
president of the society delivered the 
address of welcome Betewen the first 
and second acts, Miss Leah Miller, a 
graduate of 1929, delighted the audi- 
ence by singing "The Rosary." 

For their play the Clionians pre- 
sented "The Cradle Song" a two-act,, 
play translated from the Spanish of 
G. Martinez Sierra. The scene is laid 
in a Spanish convent. The subject is 
the raising by the Nuns of a found- 
ling left in their charge by a desti- 
tute and erring mother. The child 
grows up in the eighteen years that 
elapse between the first and second 
acts, ad the play concludes with her 
departure to marry the man of her 
choice. 

The play was well-chosen, well- 
coached, and admirably presented 
Throughout the whole of it there is 
virtually no action; dialogue and char- 
acterization alone carry it along. Each 
act works up to an effective and affect- 
ing emotional climax. It is unfor- 



CAN WE REPEAT THIS 

AGAINST ALBRIGHT? 



Here's how a writer in a current 
Magazine describes an outstanding 
ev ent in Blue and White football his- 
t° r y- Can our team show the same 
qualities of leadership and brilliant 
headwork in Thursday's game? 

Dickinson and Lebanon Valley col- 
leges are playing in Carlisle, Pa., in 
1926. The score is 6-0 in favor of 
Vinson, the ball is on Lebanon's 
twenty-yard line and belongs to tne 
a tter, and thirty-eight seconds re- 
m& in to be played. 

To overcome Dickinson's lead the 
Va Ueyites will have to carry the ball 
ei ghty yards in thirty-eight seconds 
Set it across the home team's goal 
llne without fumbling then take it out 
an <i kick goal. 

The Dickinson band leader, like 
everyone else, is certain it can't be 
. 0ne > wherefore the home band bursts 
l0 yously into the Dickinson victory 
marc h and, followed by almost the 
enti re student body, it heads for the 
ClVlc center of Carlisle, there to par- 

® and revel in abandoned triumph, 
ut the revelers are reckoning with- 
° ut those thirty-eight seconds and the 

° r °sity of Harvev Nitrauer's cerebral 

Let me remind the reader that a 
ea ^ may ask for a halt three times 
(Continued on Page 4) 



tunate perhaps that the first act is 
vastly superior to the second from the 
point of view of dramatic effectiveness, 
lit paPesses the elements of balance 
and dramatic relief and even charac- 
terization, the lack of which is no- 
ticeable i the second act. The second 
act then tended to drag from its very 
nature. Liberal "cutting," especially 
m the longer speeches of Don Antonio 
and Teresa and to some extent in the 
conventional dialogue, would have 
speeded the climax without serious 
loss. Indeed, rather it would have 
gained in sustaining the spectator's 
interest, as part of this act was play- 
ed in almost total darkness. The ac- 
tors were under the purely technical 
difficulty of picking up cues. 

Continued on Page 4) 



ALBRIGHT SCORES 
OF PAST YEARS 

RIVALS TAKE BUT TWO 
VICTORIES SINCE 
1900 



L. V. Albright 

1929 6 

1928 13 6 

1927 6 6 

1926 16 3 

1925 41 

1924 21 6 

1919 48 

1918 13 6 

1912 10 7 

7 20 

1902 16 11 

Such is the list of compaartive scor- 
es for the years since 1900. In the 
years not mentioned no game was 
played, between L. V. C. and her an- 
cient rival. Albright has beaten us 
twice, last year and in 1912 when they 
beat us he second game. There has 
only been one tie and that was a mis- 
take. L. V. has to her credit 8 wins 
to Albright's 2. 

j She now appears a more formidable 
contestant in the struggle for school 
supremacy since she has consolidated 
with Schuylkill last year. That makes 
the fight harder but a victory sweeter. 
To look at the scores for this year, 
Albright seems to have the edge in 
scoring, but by the edge isn't a good 
way to hold things, they should be 
grasped by the handle. Come on boys, 
grab the handle and turn the pot 
over — spill the beans. 

It will be lots of fun doing what 
people think to be the impossible. And 
we did it to Brown, let's do it now. 
We can, we will, we must. 



FROSH CO-EDS CARRY 
OUT NOVEL PUNISHMEN1 



A new kind of punishment was 
handed out to four Frosh coeds by 
the W. S. G. A. recently. The sen- 
tence was delivered in the form of a 
mandate requiring the presentation 
of a skit in chapel on Tuesday morn- 
ing. The reception afforded by the 
audience rendered the punishment an 
expiation sufficient for the worst of 
crimes. All the varieties of cat-calls, 
hoots and otherwise derogatory sounds 
known to mankind were generously 
available. 

Those who participated were the 
Misses Gem Gemmel, Marjorie Miller, 
Margaret Kohler and Winnie Miller. 
In view of the interference the skit 
►vas a commendable production. The 
student body added the final touch by 
joining in singing the Alma Mater. 



"YT OBSERVE 
THANKSGIVING 



MEET IN JOINT SESSION 
TO PRESENT 
PROGRAM 



A special Thanksgiving program 
wes presented at the joint session of 
the "Y. M." and "Y. W. C. A." in 
Engle Hall, Sunday evening, Novem- 
ber 23. The service was quite in- 
teresting and varied throughout; it 
was based on that old, yet ever new- 
theme, "Giving Thanks to God," and 
was therefore very appropriate for 
the season. 

The meeting opened with an orgar. 
prelude rendered in a skillful man- 
ner by Effie LeVan. The audience 
then joined in the singing of several 
hymns; following this, a very hefjS- 
ful devotional period was conducted 
by Paul Emenheiser. A vocal quar- 
tet composed of Leona Allen, Rob- 
ert Roudabush, Paul Keene, and 
Hilda Buckley next rendered a se- 
lection which was much appreciated 
by all. 

The Thanksgiving theme was dis- 
cussed and enlarged upon by Chester 
Goodman who brought to his aud- 
ience a message of inspiration and 
cheer. A reading, in keeping with 
the theme, was also presented by 
Marion Kruger in her usual effective 
manner. A beautiful and final num- 
ber, a mandolin duet by Gretna 
Drawbaugh and Fred Mund,. brough 
the program to a close. 



NOTICE! 



Lebanon Valley students will be 
admitted to the Albright game free of 
charge, provided they apply at the 
box-office for a free-pass and are able 
to identifvy themselves. No free pas- 
es will be granted before the regular 
time of opening the box office on 
Thursday. 



INTERGLASS GAME 
RESULTS IN TIE 



TEAMS ARE MORE EVENLY 
MATCHED THAN 
USUAL 



For the second successive year, the 
annual Soph-Frosh football game re- 
sulted in a stalemate, ending with 
the score standing at 6-6. The two 
teams were more evenly matched 
than has been the case in former) 
years. 

Neither offensive was working well 
with the result that there was not 
much gaining except when some 
oaekfield man eluded a tackier or 
two. The 1 ground gained by the two 
teams was nearly the same the Soph- 
omores getting seven first downs to 
the Freshmen's six. 

Karinch of the Sophs and Bowers 
and Wycotf of the Freshmen were 
the leading ground gainers. Fake 
and Henne also did some nice running 
for their respective teams. 

March and Sparks stood out on the 
Frosh line. March especially broke 
through many times to throw the 
opponent backs for losses. Speg 
played a good game at left end for 
the Sophomores while Tobias and 
Shrope also showed up well. 

Coach Sthortlidge's team was the 
first to score. At the close of the 
second quarter ■ they tore off two 
first downs to put them five yards 
from the goal. Bowers then threw a 
pass to Wycoff to score the touch- 
down. Another pass by the same 
combination for the extra point was 
batted to the ground. 

"Bob" Schaak's Sophs came right 
back and marched the ball down the 
field for their score. Shrope took the 
kickoff and brought it up to the 45- 
yard line. A pass to Karinch netted 
(C< mtiriued on Page 4 ) 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

MEET IN NORTH HALL 



The Life Work Recruits of the 
college held their regular meeting on 
Thursday evening in North Hall par- 
lor. After singing several hymns, the 
groups participated in a devotional 
period. Paul D. Emenheiser led the 
devotions, using for the basis of hM 
remarks the subject. "Truth." TO 

The speaker of the evening wal 
Edward Shellenberger. He spoke or 
the Koran, and in his remarks com 
pared it with the Bible. He also in- 
cluded the life of Mohammed in luV 
talk. 

Following the address a discusser 
was held on "Prayer." The variou- 
phases and values of prayer were 
dealt with. 

The groups then decided to mee+ 
every three weeks in the future. It. 
was also decided to have the discus- 
sion period play a more important 
part in the meetings. After a prayer- 
circle the meeting was dismissed. 



Y. W.'s ENTERTAIN 

INMATES OF HOM2 



The Y. W. C. A. ever loyal to its 
purpose of bringing cheer and in- 
spiration to others less fortunate 
than themselves conducted a special 
Thanksgiving service at the Widow's 
Home, Lebanon, Sunday afternoon, 
November 23. Sunshine and good 
cheer were generously offered to the 
inmates as they listened to the fal- 
lowing presentations — all of which 
were carried out in an interesting 
and commendable manner. 
Piano Solo Dorothy Garber 

Hymn in Unison 

Violi Solo Gretna Drawbaugh 

Devotions ' Sara Ensminger 

Hymn in Unison 

Talk Eva Peck 

Vocal Duet Buffington & Gelwicks 
Mandolin Solo Gretna Drawbaugh 
Hymn in Unison 
Prayer Circle 



CLOSE CONTEST 
EXPECTED THURS. 

COMPARATIVE REVIEWS 
OF SEASON ONE 
OF INTEREST 




and the 
home 



On Thanksgiving afternoon, Leba- 
non Valley will play its big game of 
the year when the Blue and White 
gridders invade the Albright stadium 
at Reading to engage with our most 
ancient and bitter rival. 
.A hard fought game is usually the 
result when these wo bitter opponents 
face each other; this year's game >.a 
expected to meet all former records 
and then some. The local eleven has 
been looking forward to this game 
during the entire season, as victory 
over Albright is always L. V. C.'s ob- 
jective. The old fighting spirit seems 
to be gradually re 
boys are determin 
Albright's scalp. 

Albright has made 
record this year, which gives them the 
edds over the Mylinmen. Six: victor- 
ies against one defeat I one no 
overshadows Lebanon Valley's three 
victories and five defeats. Albright's 
lone defeat was handed to them 'oy 
Bucknell by the score of 26-0. 

Last week Western Maryland could 
get no mire than a 7-7 tie with Al- 
bright, being beaten until the last 
three minutes when they put over a 
touchdown and tied the score. Pre- 
viously to this, Western Maryland had 
Compiled a string of seventeen straight 
victories in the last two years before 
being stopped by Albright. 

While the Red and White team was 
reaping glory it also worxed hard- 
ships on them. They had to figTii 

(Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, THANKSGIVING, 1930 



Jfa Hie (&#ik$unw 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, *31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '81., Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

RE PORTO RIAL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '3 2.. Asst. Business Manager 
C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies io cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



ON TO ALBRIGHT 



The playing of the Albright game 
at Reading on Thursday marks the 
close of the regular foot-ball season 
for the Lebanon Valley eleven. Com- 
pared with previous seasons, the 
schedule has been completed with . 
fine showing. This is especially 
in view of the large proportion of nev\ 
material which turned out for practice 
at the beginning of the season. 

Now here are a few facts worti. 
considering. This new material has 
been steadily improving. A moderate 
schedule has done much to accomp^is. 
this result. The team, too, has had 
a rest of a week and a half. Tha. 
rest has been a two-fold benefit. It 
has helped the players to gain a muc;. 
needed rest, and has afforded an op- 
portuity for injured members to re- 
cuperate. 

On the other hand, Albright ha 
had a full schedule, including one of 
the hardest games of the season las: 
Saturday. Her team has been pit- 
ted against some fast-playinng aggre 
gations; the well-known tendency for 
an eleven to burn-up under such condi- 
tions has had ample opportunity to 
assert itself. From the standpoint of 
the odds therefore Lebanon Valley has 
nothing to fear. 

It is needless to overlook the fact, 
however, that we are pitted against a 
formidable rival. Albright has made 
a most commendable showing; it 
would be a certain mark of poor 
sportsmanship to attempt to deny it. 
If the Blue and White, is to rise above 
the Red and White at Reading on 
Thursday, it is going to take all the 
resources at the command of L. V. C. 
to make it so. 

The team has made its mistakes this 
season, of course it has, "out it has 
also played some mighty fine foot- 
ball. And it has the grit, the back-bone 
the determination to repeat its fine 
playing in tip-top shape at Reading. 

On the other hand, the support giv- 
en the team by the student body has 
been downright rotten. Pep meet- 
ings with a handful of rooters in at- 
tendance, brick-bats by the bushel and 
boquets by the pint, cheers for rivals 
and jeers for the varsity — is this the 
sort of food on which a team shall 
thrive ? 

There has been entirely too much 
grumbling; let's quit it right now 
.There has been entirely too little en- 
couragement offered the boys; let's 
get started at once. We want that 
Albright game, see? We don't give 
a continental what the rest of the 
season has been like, if we lose that 



game we're going to feel mighty blue, 
all of us. 

We're oging to take that game, too. 
But it's going to take everything we've 
got to do it. Albright is out for bloco 
She hasn't had a better chance to 
get it for a good many years. We 
pledge our faith and hopes on you, 
team. What do you say? 



THANKSGIVING 



The celebration of Thanksgiving 
this year should be an event of singu- 
lar importance. America has felt the 
pinch of a combination of business 
depression and drought of a magni- 
tude seldom known to our fore-fathers. 
Unemployment and poverty offer some 
very real challenges to our economic 
organization. 

How much real thankfulness will 
be in evidence it is difficult to pre- 
dict. Certain it is that many of the 
nations have suffered to a much great- 
er extent than America in the grip 
of universal business depression. Cer- 
tain it is, too, that ample opportuni- 
ties are afforded for a practical ob- 
seivance of the day by helping in c 
way or another to relieve the all-too- 
prevalent distress among the unem- 
ployed. 

Business depression or no business 
depression, however, Thanksgiving is 
here, and for college students every- 
where in general and at L. V. C. in 
particular it is a time for optimism 
and good cheer. ■ 

Chief among our reasons for goc 
cheer is the fact that our boys are 
going to bag Albright. Isn't that 
justification enough for the La Vie to 
wish its many friends a happy 
Thanksgiving. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Whew — when on Earth will the Edi- 
tor cut down on assignments. We jus* 
gvot this column out for the last issue 
"bout two days ago and hence are 
all pumped for ideas. Requests for 
the same received no response. So 
we performed a little research work 
and inspected all the rooms in iZve 
Dorm, Varsity Hall and the Jersey 
Club. Due to the fact that your cor- 
respondent is a male he could not in- 
spect the rooms of North Hall, Wesi 
Hall or S^uth Hall. At least he deem- 
ed it inadvisable. 

The conclusion arrived at, after 
visiting some sixty rooms and view- 
ing the wall decorations and general 
appearance of the abodes was, that 
they were very collegiate, in the out- 
siders conception of that word. 

In sooth we found only four beds 
made, and it must be kept in mind 
that the inspection was made at eight 
6'clock in the evening. Many of the 
boys had bits of poetic inspiration 
hung or plastered on their walls, but 
let us approach that in detail. 
\ In Stewart's and Wogan's room we 
found the signs; Pay for Children 
that Walk; Danger High Voltage; No 
Trespassing, a mess of movie queens 
and a few hotel towels. 

Salek, Kinney and Coleman offer 
the following: Don't Waste Air; Here 
All Next Week (which incidentally 
was removed when the Thanksgiving 
holidays were metioned) and about 
twenty pennants. 

In Long's and Fridy's room we 
found the work of an unknown paro- 
dist in the fcjlowing: 

Early to bed and early to rise 

Keeps your roommate from wearing 
your ties. 

Also in the same room were the 
signs: Boarding by the Day or Week; 



and Sergeants Don't Take Orders. 

Albert Alexander Joseph Kazlusky 
reeeives his incentive to be some- 
thing in this world from the follow- 
ing, which we foud above his desk: 

Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime, 
And departing leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of Time. 
Above the door of Shortlidge's dom- 
icile were the sweet words: Love 
Nest. 

Tires, tubes, one slightly used vic- 
trola and a No Visitors sign were 
the main objects of interest in the 
Kelly-Rue-Thrush suite. 

Ulrich ad Werner optimists extra- 
ordinary have one sign that causes 
others to hide in shame: Smile: 
Quiturebelliaken. 

Ike Grant and Joe Hutchinson have 
ja radio. Enough said. 

Kraybill, Goodman and the double 
iZechs receive their inspiration from 
the following: 

While some delve deep in mustie 
ji books. 

In quest of learn in rare, 
Ye wise folk walk by trees and 
brooks 

And gain of wisdom there. 

Kuhnert and Whisler greet the vis- 
itor with the sign: Hello There!!) 
Hello Everybody. 

In the Rhen-Clements chamber 

Were discovered 4 Tampa pennants 

pne tinted and framed picture of the 
famous Bok Tower and a sign, Re- 
served Seats Extra. 
• Above Brute Lehman's desk were 
10 dance programs. Inspiration 
enough ? 

Also Reeder offers the- simile that 
Shaeffer's desk is as bare as OLd 
Mother Hubbard's Cupboard. 

A part of Hood College, 32 penn- 
ants, 14 empty tobacco tins and the 
placard, Cheer Up The Best Is Yet 
To Come, occupy poins of importance 
jn the Barr, Beam and Christman 
room. 

Speg, for the edification of the Cig- 
arette Grubbers Asociation, has the 
sign: If You Want To Bum a Cigar- 
ette, Ask Us For Chesterfields So We 
Can Reply Honestly. We Smoke 
Luckies. 

| Schrope, Adams and Mantz have 
their wall pasted up with inumerable 
Motion picture secnes and an instruc- 
tive placard: For Your Own Enter- 
tainment. Silence Please ! 
I The two Frosh who deserve a niche 
m the Hall of Fame are Klitch and 
Hoover, due to the fact that their 
beds were made. 

In the Wise-Salada-Fake room we 
found the Yoyo with which Bartolet 
of L. V. C. broke the intercollegiate 
Yoyo record in May 1930 and an auto- 
mobile license appendage: Teachers 
Pet. Of Course They Do. 

Varsity Hall, according to signs, is 
occupied by men of note. We found 
this: 

C. Bartolet, M. A. 

E. Boyer, D. V. M. 

C Heller, Pres. V. H. F. 

J. Morris, B. S. A. 

And on another door the following : 

A. E. Buzzel, LL. D. 

R. B. Greene, M. D. 

Prof. T. C. Walker, Mus. D. 

Visiting the Jersey Club we dis- 
covered, six slightly used cigarettes 
five beds, one deer skin, a painting 
of General Field Marshal von Hinden- 
burg, pictures of co-eds, one, Rudolf 
Miller asleep in bed, a mediocre Bull 
Session, the inspiring sign: You 
Came Here for an Education. Now 
Try and Get It, with the post script 
Nerts, and 24 medals, 23 earned for 
track and one for mathematics. 




Don't forget the big game Thurs 
day — Albright tied Western Mary- 
land, the only undefeated Eastern 
eleven 7-7 at Read'ng, Saturday. Think 
what it means to as if we can turn 
this game. 

"Gus" Daubv, playing his last inter- 
collegiate game for the Blu^ and 
Wh'te vas un n nimously elected' cap 
tain for the Albright game. This if 
the only time this season that tih~ 
captain has been chosen by the team 
Best of luck, Gus. 



Jce Volkins. the Frosh lunrnary whr 
plays well at either end or tackle, i~ 
back in uniform and it is rumored that 
his injuiy received in the Juniata gam<~ 
will be healed enough t~ "How Irm 
him to play against cur traditional 
rivals 



Russ Williams is receive- ing rapid- 
lv from his injury received in the 
Washington game and there is a pos- 
sibility of him being in our line up 
r gainst Albright. 



The squad has had no real scrim- 
^ap-e during the past week and it is 
doubtful whe+her they will before th r 
b ; g gamp. Scrimmage '*s » risky un- 
dertaking before the crucial game o<" 
f he season, e^p^ciallv wh<m our team 
has weakened as it has this yea 1 ' b-- 
costly injuries. 



The coach has divided the sauad in- 
+o two divisions. The scrubs are my- 
thically "Albright" and thev havr 
been running the Red ad While's phy- 
->gainst our powerful front wall dur 
ing the past week. 



Haines and Hatton continued thei - 
Villiant plaving for Albright in l*>s' 
Q atu'dav's tilt. Hino is another bo- 
+!hat knows football and dIpvs v. H 
is a favorite with the Reading fans. 



Kelly- Patmio. Wood and D-u 1 ^ wiP 
V^ang up + heir togs after the A^^'gV 
^•-me. This is Kelly's and Patrizio'r 
'■hird year with the Blu^ and White 
while Wood and Daub ha^e galloped 
-ver our gridiron for four yeaV 
We'll miss you plenty boys — Let'r 
make the last game a real one. We 
want Albright's scalp. 



The game Thursday will b^ th^ 
first taste of conflict with AlbriglV 
for some of ou*- b^ys. Hero ir. a 
chance for the Frosh stars to com- 
+ brough. You have what it takes bov 
and if we ever needed it we need i + 
now. We want that Albright game! 



This year has been a year of up- 
sets in college football. Albrigh + 
will consider it an upset if we beat 
them. We will consider it an upse + 
if we don't. We are in for a good 
fight but, we will bring home the 
bacon and change the traditional 
Thanksgiving dub. This is one time 
we prefer bacon to turkey. 



The "cocky" Frosh eleven that pre - 
dicted a "walk away" victory over 
the Sophs suffered ouite a shock Sat- 
urday on the local gridiron. The 
game ended in a 6-C> dead-lock. I won- 
der if any outside influence cause the 
jophs to "spank" the Frosh so hard? 



Don't forget our battle cry — Beat 
Albright! Let's all go to Reading 
and show the team that we are back 
of them— 100 percent for L. V. C. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Joseph A. Shadzin, '31, who h as 
lived in Philadelphia all his life, vvi«j 
the exception of a few months aft er 

es 



he was born in Poland, and <j 
not knew the Polish language will be 
deported to Poland because of n j s 
criminal record. 



Tornadoes which took 21 lives and 
njured about 100 persons in Okla- 
homa, Kansas, and Arkansas on 
Thursday wsre followed by a winter 
sow storm. Wire service to the Pa c j. 
fic coast was badly hit as wires snap- 
ped through the prairie country from 
"ceumulations of ice, sudden temper- 
aim es and high winds. 



Sinclair Lewis and his wife will sail 
for Stockholm on November 29, to be 
present at the activities connected 
with the presentation of the Nobel 
prize awards on December 10. At 
present he is being drilled in the 
Swedish language by Baro John Lil- 
kenorantz, former officer of the Royal 
Guard, but now editor of me Swedish 
Trade Journal. Lewis will speak be- 
fore the Academy on Present-Day 
American Literature. 



The flames of a carbon arc were 
converted into a new kind of loud 
speaker at the Bell Laboratories re- 
cetly. Its tones were not quite as 
strong as those of a loud speaker. 



David Ridgeway Johnson, 17, was 
acclaimed the outstanding student vo- 
cational agriculture in the U. S. at 
the America Royal Livestock Show. 
He was awarded $1000 by the weekly 
Kansas City Star and was given the 
title of "The Star American Farmer." 

When he is not doing work on the 
93 acre farm one-half mile from 
Stockton, N. J., he is attending the 
College of Agriculture, Rutgers Uni- 
versity. He is a member of the Fresh- 
man Class. 



Hungry school children of Phila- 
delphia will be served free breakfasts 
daily. There are several thousand 
pupils whose parents are out of work 
and in need of financial aid. At least 
$100,000 will be necessary to finance 
this plan until next May. Several clubs 
and private citizens have already given 
their assistance to this project. 



November 25th will be a holiday 
throughout Norway, for on that day 
twenty-five years ago King Haakon 
VII ascended the throne. During his 
entire reign he had had no friction 
with the Storting o r the administra- 
tion. 



Paris is worried over the traffic 
problem. Experts estimate there are 
4>000 too many taxis. The total num- 
ber now operating are 20,000, a num 
ber which prohibits a living wage a 
which jams the streets. 



.Hi 




In a quiet and simple ceremony ^ 1SS 

Elva Reigel of the class of '30 ^ 

united in marriage to Mil. Geofla** 

Hoaster at 6:00 P. M. on Wednesday 

November 19, at her home in Leba 

. jfl 

„„n. Since her graduation' 
June, Mrs. Hoaster has resided at > _ 
home. Mr. Hoaster is employ^ . 
the office of the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany, Lebanon, Pa. They will reSJ 
at the bride's home on Ninth Str ee ' 
Lebanon, for the present. 



4 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES'" 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Almost any nice little co-ed— Honey. I'm knee deep in love with you. 
Babe Earley — Allright. I'll put you on my wading- list. 



-LVC- 



Slim — I simply detest mingling with my inferiors. 
Arlene — I didn't know you had any. 

LVC 



He thought she was cool, 

But Bill denied it; 
He thought horseradish was too, 

, Until he tried it. 

LVC 



Carl — Do you think you could learn to love me? 
Mary Elizabeth — Well. I learned to eat spinach. 

LVC 

"That last kiss was nice, dear." 
"Who said it was the last one?" 

LVC 



Him — I've handled some of the best lightweights in the business. 
Her — Well, get the idea out of your head that I'm a pugilist! 

LVC 

Muriel — Jack and I are engaged! 
Mabel — You don't mean it! 
Muriel — No; but he thinks I do. 

LVC 



"What was the rumpus at your sweet mama's hruse last m'ght? A firo 
alarm?" 

"No, a sire alarm." 

LVC 

And They Shot Lincoln— 

"Let's have a rubber of bridge you p^y, don't you?" 
"Well. Ihardly know. You see, I've never tried." 

LVC 



Ranck — The closer a man gets to Nature the happier he is. 
Mentzer — That's not what you said when you slipped on the bana- 
na peel yesterday. 



-LVC- 



"Both Herbert and Harold proposed to me eysterday.. 

"And you refused both." 

"Yes, but how did you know?" 

"I saw them shaking hands over something this morning. 

LVC 



Alex (over phone) — And please mail my ring back to me. 

Alice — You'd better come and get it. glass breaks so easily in +he m"il 



-LVC- 



'My wife went through all mv pockets last night " 
"What did she find." 

What all explores find — enough material for a lecture 



-LVC- 



&elie 



Ve it o r not— 

Y°u can always draw the queens, if vu havo the i^k. 



Tf 



Vm had seen as much as an old Flivver you'd have somp^h'n"- J " 



!* about ton! 



neither rlvpcc: ; n dvpssinp* cnwns. nor bathe in hn-h r'-ib" t !. 
an y a man develops into a liar by writing love letters. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
held its regular meeting Friday night 
in Kalo Hall. A varied program con- 
sisting of comic sketches, interesting 
and instructive talks was presented 
before a fairly large crowd. 

The first number on the program 
was a comedy skit put on by Kalo's 
talented Juniors: Messrs. Early, 
Salek, Kinney and Frevola. These 
third year men cleverly clad in cos 
tumes ranging from a Turkish batl 
several humorous selections and told 
a few select jokes. 

The next feature of the program 
was a talk by the well known Wal- 
ter O. Krumbeigel, Germany's gift 
to Kalo. "Krummie" told us some 
very interesting things about his 
native country and at the close of 
the speech it was hard for us to 
realize just what we would do if! 
,we didn't have the Germans. The 
speech was very instructive and 
Kalo plans to have more of them. 
It was the first of a series to be 
.presented by Kalo's representatives 
from distant lands. 

The main feature of the program 
was a talk by Danny Walters '18, 
a former Kalo and four letter man 
in L. V. C.'s intercollegiate Athle- 
tics. At the beginning of his speech 
Mr. Walters informed those pres- 
ent that it was not going to be a 
soft "wishy washy" confession of 
what L. V. C. and Kalo had done for 
him. It's going to be a bawling out 
as well as a congratulatory speech but 
my main purpose is to urge you to 
take the opportunities that are offer- 
ed you and not mind the hard knocks" 
said Mr. Walters. All throughout his 
speech he told of the many hard 
knocks one encounters in everyday 
life, knocks that are not soon for- 
gotten. "The best place to learn to 
'take it on the chin' is in a small 
institution," he went on to say "and 



Lebanon Valley College is no exception 

They give hard knocks as some of the 

fellows know, but he only thing to do 

is to give and endure it. Be a man 

by all means. Don't be a qu"tter. 

When you ccme to college you art 

free in some respect, ycu have to 

think and act for yourself. Don'', 

run home to pop each time ycu hit a 

bump. What are ycu going to do 

after pop has gone?" 

His speech will long ue remembered 

by all those that heard it. Kalo is 

proud to have such men as Danny 

Walters on their roll. 

* * * * 

Kalo wishes to extend Thanksgiving 
Greetings to the stuuciit body and 
faculty. May all enjoy their vacation 
and return in good health and spirits. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



fm 



A -l SKTL, 
WORKS WONDERS 




ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 



207 W. Main 



Delphian Literary Society held a 
brief session on Friday evening, Nov- 
ember 23. At this time the members 
administered the "second degree" of 
the initiatory program to the Fresh- 
men and all other newcomers who 
have pledged their future member- 
ship in this society. The group of 
individuals who received the "second 
degree" included the following: — 
Gem Gemmil, Mary Gossard, Marjor- 
ie Miller, Viola Williams, Thelma 
Shoop, Ruth Mark, Esther Smeltzer, 
Marie Ely, Evangeline Salerio, Mar- 
garet Lehn, Minna Wolfskeil, Wini- 
fred Miller, Verna Grissinger, Doro- 
thy Ely, Mary Brace, Helen Lane, 
Catherine Mowery, Dorothy Jackson, 
Regina Oiler, Leona Allen and Sadie 
Light. 



The Philo program of Friday even- 
ing was marked by its fine numbers 
and exceptional spirit. After calling 
the meeting to order, Earl Wolf, tho 
retiring president, installed president 
elect, Charles Wise. Wise then gave 
his inaugural address, expressing his 
appreciation of the honor, and recog- 
nizing his duty as the chief exe:u ive 
He then installed the rest of the offi- 
cers, who thereupon took their posi- 
tions. 

Paul Evancoe opened the literarv 
session with a talk on "Thanksgiving " 
His skill in presentation rnd the qual- 
ity or thought embodied in his re- 
marks held the close interest of h's 
hearers. For the musical part of the 
program, Carl Myers gave two violin 
solos: "Sextette" from Lucie and 
"Serenade" by Shubert. These were 
very well rendered proved del : ghtful. 
Clinton Allen next gave a character 
sketch of Knudsen, president of the 
Chevrolet Motor Company, a division 
cf the General Motors. In his matter- 
of-fact way, Allen gave the interest- 
ing high points in Knudsen's life. The 
last number was a "pep" talk by John 
David Hughes. His subject was "Beat 
Albright." He pointed out the effi- 
ciency of the L. V. C. line, and the 
prognostication made plain through- 
out his sometimes humorous and some- 
times serious speech was that the 
White and Blue would come through 
victorious on Thanksgiving Day. Af- 
ter some very "peppy" general re- 
marks, the meeting was adjourned. 



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PAQE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIgNNE, THURSDAY, Tl I A N fKSGIVING, 1930 



INTEREST CENTERS 

AROUND PLAY 



(Continued from Page 1) 



The outstanding performance was 
that of Anne Kiehl in the role of 
Teresa, the foundling grown-up. Her 
simplicity and utter naturalness, her 
ability to make every gesture count, 
to . let her lines run on rapidly and 
nturally without loss of distinctiveness 
and to sustain the somewhat trying 
emotional level of the parting scene 
contributed to a memorable perfor- 
mance of an appealing role. Upon 
Dorothy Garber as Sister Joanna of 
the Cross, fell the task of a subtle 
characterization which she handled in 
excellent fashion. Especially effec- 
tive was her performance in the final 
scene of the first act, where she 
brought out the emotional possibilities 
of t^e situation in a very moving 
manner. Lolita Mummert was well- 
cast as the Vicaress. Despite the 
somewhat unrelenting characteriza- 
tion called for by the part, she utiliz- 
ed well her few chances to unbend., 
notably at the very end of the piay. 
Elizabeth Flook ,hough possessing b\ 
nature, a rather light voice, manageu 
to give her lines with sufficient sweet- 
ness and dignity to be effetcive as. the 
Prioress. Miriam Book as Mistress 
of the Novices gave a most excellent 
and capable performance and revealed 
a stage presence that bespeaks experi- 
ence. 

,The minor female roles, w ere, fbi. 
the most part, adequately handled 
Especially effective was Mildred Nye's: 
characterization of Sister Marcella : 
fir^st as novice, then as nun. She en- 
tered fully into the spirit of the part 
which could easily have been spoiled 
by making Sister Marcella merely £ 
hoyden. This Miss Nye skillfully 
avoided. Interesting variations of 
character were contributed by .. Mary 
Anne Rupp as Sister Inez, Jane Muth 
as Sister Maria Jesus, Margaret Koh- 
ler as Sister Sagrario and Martha 
Daley as Sister Toenera. 

The only two male' roles provided 
by his most distinctively feminine 
play was that of the Doctor, by Fred 
Mund, and Don Antonio by Joseph 
Hutchinson, who except in one or twe 
of his longer speeches repressed a ten 
dency to indistinctness of diction, a 
matter of some importance in a role 
dOjubly handicapped by lack of motior 
and unnecessarily long speeches. The 
interest of. this play centers definitely 
inj the feminine parts, and the author 
was not kind to the only two men he 
pejrmits to intrude. 

Creit is due. to those responsible 
for the stage settings and most par- 
ticularly to Prof . Mary K. Wallace for 
her excellent and carefully thought- 
out direction. The success of the pro- 
duction was undoubtedly due in large 
part t9 h er efforts. 

After the play in Engle Conserva- 
tory, the students, faculty, and friends 
wended their way to the Alumni Gym- 
nasium where everyone, so inclined, 
indulged in an hour of social enter- 
tainment. Music for the occasion 
was- furnished by a popular orchestra 

The gymnasium was cleverly decor- 
ated with streamers and what not, 
presenting a very cheery and cozy ap- 
pearace. Dainty refreshments were 
served at a reasonable hour. 

The affair was most successful as 
an anniversary and one which gives 
much credit to those in charge. The 
committee chairmen were as follows: 

Play and Program, Ethel Mae How- 
er; Invitation, Naomi Shiveley; Seat- 
ing, Ruth Armacost; Decoration, Eu- 



lalie Morton; Refreshment, Alma Bin- 
ner. 

To Miss Mary Kathryn Wallace, 
Miss Mildred Myers, John Morris and 
Fred Christman, the society is espec- 
ially indebted and gratefully acknow- 
ledges all the able help which it re- 
ceived from them. 



CAN WE REPEAT THIS 

AGAINST ALBRIGHT 



{ Continued from Page 1) 



! in each half. After that each addi- 
tional request they make for "time 
out" costs them a five-yard set-back. 
One other point: When time is taken 
out for any reason the official stop 
watch is stopped on the insiant and is 
not restarted until the ball is actually 
snapped again. 

j As a rule Nitrauer "barked" his sig- 
nals- — like other good quarters — but 
just now he feels like yelping, so he 
yeips faintly and halfback Charley 
Gelbert (now playing snor estop sor 
the St. Louis Cards) drops Dack ana 
Lakes station ten yards behind iTie 
line. The ball is snapped to Charley 
and he heaves it a scant mile. When 
the oval comes down the Lebanon left 
end gathers it in and as he is tackled 
oaptam Fox cries madly, "Time Out:" 
ihe held judge stops Uig watcn, thus 
conserving for Lebanon seconds that 
ure usually wasted in slow lining up 
xor the next p*ay. But Lebanon must 
pay tor this concession, and the ref- 
eree slices five yards off tneir thirty- 
>nree-yard gain. 

'i wenty-iour seconds to go \ 

This tinie Gelbert hurls a second 
long pass. Nitrauer himself answers 
for this one 4 _and as a Dickinson tack- 
ier tells him again the Fox cry of 
"Time out!" is heard in the iand. 
Again the referee exacts a toll of five 
yards from Lebanon realty holdings, 
jeaving a net gain of twenty-two yards 
lor the invader's second barrage. 

fen seconds more. 
Harvey orders a third forward p^rs, 
>_.nd a tird time Gelbert bombards 'the 
.ionie interceptors, if any. The pass 
^s incomplete; it strikes the ground 
and time is automatically taken out. 

As the teams line up the distant re- 
frain of a band grows fainter on the 
ear. It dies altogether as the referee 
.nforms the two captains of the time 
they have left to play. 

ONE WHOLE AND UNDIVIDED 
SECOND. ; . 

But that's enough to start another 
play, and the game will not De over 
until that play ends and the ball is de- 
clared dead. Again Gelbert" takes the 
snap and hurls the ball heavenward. 

This fourth long pass is intended 
for Rudy Cunjack, who plays rig/it 
end. Rudy darts along the ground; 
into his waiting arms sinks the ball. 

Rudy's feet are one foot beyond the 
Dickinson's goal line. It is a twenty- 
four-carat touchdown ad the score is 



tied. 

And now Lebanon must be allowed 
her try at goal. It is made and the 
game is won 7-6. Almost it is a 
miracle. 

They say it took sixteen messengers 
on motorcycles to overtake the par- 
ading Dickinson band; and it took all 
of them thirty-eight minutes, a rule 
book and plenty of Einstein mathe- 
matics to convice those cheer leaders 
of what had happened in thirty-eight 
seconds. 

The shades of night were falling 
fast as they folded their cornets anu 
pilently stole away, only the tuba emit" 
ting one mournful bar of: 

"We won't go home till morning." 



a touchdown 
plays later. 



The game ended a few 



The lineup;^ " r " 
Sophomore|^,„ ; 



Freshmen 



Barnes 
Shrope 
Tobias 
Saylor 
Leibig 
Speg 
Henne 
Clements 
Morrison 
Karinch 



INTERCLASS GAME 

RESULTS IN TIE 



(Continued from Page .1) 



twenty yards and immediately after 
that Karinch made another first 
down by an eleven yard gain. Several 
line bucks and a Frosh penalty put 
the oval on the two-yard line from 
where Karinch took it across. Mor- 
rison's pass was beyond Speg's hands 
and the extra point did not score. 

The second half was dull until near 
the end of the game when each team 
made a final bid to break the tie. 
First the Frosh staged a determined 
offensive for three first downs to 
the Sophs ten-yard mark. Here they 
were held and a pass was incomplete 
over the goal giving the Sophs the 
ball on the twenty yards nearly geU 
ting away from the safety ! man for 



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Q. B. " Bowers 
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H. B. Wycoff 
F. B. Todd 
Score' by Periods: — 

Frosh 6 0—6 

Sophs ..0 6 0—6 

Substitutions— Snowhill , for Shrom, 
Jacks for Clements, I^ehmanHfor Peif- 
fer, Fake $dr SnQwhrtt-,* Holman for 
Morrison, j^KrunrDeigel for Leibig, 
Dellinger for Krumbeigeh 
; Referee — Kelly, Umpire— Lechthal- 
er, Head Lindsman— S. Light. 



CLOSE CONTEST 

EXPECTED THURS. 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
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ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

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(Continued from Page 1) 



tooth and nail for sixty minutes wn'~e 
L. V. was enjoying a rest. In addition 
two good backfield men received in- 
juries which although they are not 
serious certainly did not do them any 



ay 



good. Furthermore Albright was g 
ing at top pace without rest while l 
V. has been carefully preparing - tQ 
reach the. peak of form on Thursd 
afternoon. 

If Albright lias become over-confi. 
dent by reason of her victories, s h e 
will have' to change the tune when 
Lebanon Valley hits her. The student 
*oody is aU back of the team and wish 
success on Turkey Day. 



Faculty Notes 

President Gossard, due to a relapse 
in his apparently improving health 
will remain at Atlantic City longer 
than was anticipated. Mrs. Gossard 
remains with the President. 



Miss Mary K. Wallace, associate 
professor of English, entertained 
the Clio cast of "The Cradle Song" 
at her rooms on College Avenue, in 
a very delightful and uniformed man- 
ner. Everyone enjoyed the recrea- 
tion following a strenuous rehearsal 
on Thursday evening. 



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EVERYBODY OUT 
FOR STAR COURSE 
TUES., DEC. 1G 



VOLUME VII 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1930 



No. 9 



Albright Triumphs in Bitterly Fought Match 



DAUB MAKE S SPECTA CULAR RUN 

INTERFERENCE ON RECEIVER CALLED ON LONG PASS 
TURNS TIDE AGAINST LOCALS IN 
FINAL PERIOD 



Lebanon Valley's hopes for a vic- 
tory over Albright were postponed foi 
another year when the Blue and White 
lost out by a narrow margin after a 
hard fought game in the Reading 
Stadium on Thanksgiving Day. Al 
bright won by a 12-6 score before a 
crowd of five thousand people wh 
braved the cold weather to view the 
contest. 

"Gus" Daub, captain of the team 
for the game, made himself the hero 
for the losers by making a beautiful 
run of 79-yards for Lebanon Valley' 
touchdown. This run, the longest 
one made this year, came only a few 
seconds before the close of the first 
half and tied the score at six-all at 
half time. 

The game was hard fought witl 
each team trying its best to win. The 
hard tackling coupled with the frozer 
ground was responsible for quite a 
few knocks during the afternoon. 

From start to finish the game war 
full of action and presented no dul" 
moments. Albright drew first blood 
on the first play of the second quar- 
ter after a series of gains in the first 
period. Hattan took the ball acrosf 
but his try for the extra point was 
blocked. 

For the remainder of the quarter 
the play seesawed back and forth with 
boners being even u* ; l Daub broke 
away on his tnrilling run. With the 



SINCLAIR LEWIS IS 

DISCUSSED BY LEADERS 



The bi -weekly meeting of the Read- 
er s Club was held in the parlor of 
^°rth Hall n the evening of Decem- 
ber 3. The club discussed the writings 
of Sinclair Lewis, who recently won 
th -e Nobel Prize for literature and is 
ow in Copenhagen to receive his 
award. 

Naomi Shively introduced Lewis 
**** a short history of his life, pre- 
par ing the way for an interpretation 
of his writings. Mary Jane Eppley 
ave a thorough report on Arrow- 
^iith, satire on the pure scientist. 
he next report was by Anne Wolfe, 
i% on Dodsworth, a satire on 
^ social climber. The sensational 
mer Gantry was reviewed by Walter 
j-umbiegel. Elizabeth Ulrich report- 
°n Babbitt, satirizing th e confirm- 
, business man. The quintette of 
s ^is's works was completed by Main 
^eet, reviewed by Margaret Lehn. 
d e 6 reports we re all very good and 
, arly showed Lewis's method and 
£ v mt of view. The president, Paul 
p e ^ nCOe ' reac * an article from a recent 
judical, relative to Main Street and 
ls - A general discussion follew- 

b-mt 



the 



ffl which all contributed valuable 



ball on the 21-yard line, Slack started 
toward right tackle and threw a lat- 
eral to Daub who was going around 
the end. "Gus" fumbled the ball but 
catching it on the first bounce found 
a clear field ahead due to good inter 
ference by his teammates. He outrac 
ed the safety man and went over the 
goal for a touchdown. Stone's place 
ment kick for the extra point was 
blocked. 

Each team fought desperately is the 
(second half to break the deadlock with 
Albright getting the break that won 
the game. Early in the fourth quarter 
they tried a long pass and the referee 
called interference on the receiver, 
giving Albright the ball on the eight 
yard line. From there Hatton again 
took the oval across for the score. 
Again Lebanon Valley's line was 
through to block the kick. 

Fighting desperately, the Mylinmei; 
put on a sustained attack that carried 
them 60 yards only to stop near the 
goal line. With the backfield men 
making nice gains and Daub throwing 

(Continued on Page 4) 



UNUSUAL STAR 
COURSE NUMBER 

DRAMATIC CARTOONIST 
OFFERS NOVEL 
FEATURE 



■s. 



On December 16 at 8:15 P. M., John 
Bockewitz, the dramatic cartoonist, 
will present the third Star Course pro- 
gram of the season. Mr. Bacewitz fea- 
tures in animated cartoons, aided by 
electrical effects, and is a very clever 
artist. He has introduced many in- 
novations and novelties into his type 
of program, which| is made very de- 
lightful and beautiful, due to his 
ability to produce marvelous color 
effects by the aid of electricity. 
Among his selections are illustrations 
,of Kipling's "Road to Mandalay," 
>Toyes, "The Highwayman, and Payne's 
"Home, Sweet Home." 

Mr. Bockewitz's program is the firsv 
of its type to be presented here by 
a Star Course Committee, and there- 
fore should prove of great interest to 
11. There can be no doubt of the en- 
tertaining qualities and popularity of 
this sort of demonstration. 

Star Course has been poorly sup- 
ported this year. Its remaining on the 
College Calendar depends upon its suc- 
cess during the present season. There 
are two numbers left. Let's support 
them as we should and insure Star 
Course for next year. Boost it ! 



GIRL DAYS-STUDENTS 

FORM ORGANIZATION 



We are informed that the organiza- 
tion of a club for girl day-students, 
to which have been given the name 
Sigma Kappa Eta, has just been com- 
pleted. The president, Ruth Liller 
has arranged to hold monthly meetings 
in the South Hall parlor. The pro- 
grams are to be diversified in charac- 
ter and will consist entirely of original 
contributions. 

The purpose of the organization it 
to furnish a means of fellowship 
among the girl students and to atone 
in some measure for the loss by the 
day-students of the opportunities — 
social and otherwise — which dormitory 
life affords. 

Sigma Kappa Eta is a new-born 
babe, but who can say whether it may 
not be a Hercules, or should one say 
an Amazon Hippolyta, in the cradled 



"Y" CQNERENOE 

AT DICKINSON 



LOCAL DELEGATION IS 
SECOND LARGEST 
PRESENT 



On December 5, 6 and 7 a Y. M. C. 
A. Conference for all colleges in the 
central part of the state was held at 
Dickinson College, Carlisle. The con- 
ference was well attended. The L. V 
C. delegation consisted of ten students 
and two members of the faculty. 

The theme of the conference was 
"Finding and Sharing God." Dr. Ellis 
of Juniata, and Dr. Harrison, medical 
missionary to Arabia, were the speak- 
ers, and were very much appreciated. 

Lebanon Valley was honored by 
having the second largest delegation 
present, and by placing on e of then 
delegates, Mr. Robert Roudabush, in 
the office of General Chairman of the 
Conference. Those who attended were 
Profs. Butterwick and Light, and 
Messrs. Wise, Rourabush, Allen, Good- 
man, H. Zech, Clements, McFaul, Es- 
sich, Buzzell and Shirk. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR ! 



Friday, December 12 — Regular 
meetings of I Herary Societies; 
Kalo, Delphian, Philo and Clio. 
Saturday, December 13 — Sophomore 
Party. 

Sunday, December 14 — Friendly 
Hour in North Hall Parlour 5:45 

Tuesday, December 16 — Star 
Course Program. A cartoonist. 
Bockewitz. 

Wednesday, December 17 — Annual 
Christmas Banquet followed by 
a play given in the Engle Con- 
servatory. 



JUNIOR PLAY AN 
UNUSUAL SUCCESS 

ACCLAIMED BY MANY AS 
FINEST PRODUCTION 
IN YEARS 



Before a large and appreciative 
audience, the Junior class of Leba- 
non Valley College presented in Engle 
nali on Wednesday evening, Decem- 
ber 10 at 8:00 P. M., "Pygmalion," a 
comedy in five acts by Bernard iShaw. 

The story takes place in England. 
A young "gutter-snipe," a flower-giri, 
a perfect example of her class, is plac- 
ed under the influence of a distin- 
guished professor of phonetics lor 
six months. He guarantees that he 
can make a real lady of her in that 
short period of time. She is trans- 
formed into a lady such as she ha~ 
always wished to be and poses as a 
duchess at the ambassador's ball. Hib 
work being finished, the professoi 
{ias no further use for the "Newly- 
Made" lady. The play ends with the 
dower girl about to be married to a 
young society gentleman. 

The play was an absolute success 
from beginning to end. From the very 
first raising of the curtain until its 
final roll, the play was brimming 
with action. It is full of life and 
reality. There are touches of sarcasm, 
of cynicism, of humor, of sorrow, of 
happiness, as only Bernard Shaw can 
give them to us. The play, though 
containing five acts, is not long-drawn 
nor tiresome but holds our eager at- 
tention every minute of the . time. 
Action keeps it going at full-tilt es- 
pecially when Eliza, the flower girl, 
is on the stage. Each actor did his 
or her impersonation exceptionally 
well and helped to make of it a most 
successful and outstanding perfor- 
mance. 

In the difficult role of Eliza Doo- 
little, Eva Peck outdid herself in mak- 
ing of it a memorable performance 
one which will not quickly be forgot- 
ten. Both as the young, ignorant, un- 
cultured, uneducated flower girl and 
in the role of the would-be duchess, 
she gives absolutely excellent por- 
trayals. Her acting was indeed above 
criticism. Every movement, every 
Continued on Page 4) 



LUNCHEON IS HELD 

FOR COMMERCE CLU: 



At a regular meeting of the Com- 
merce Club held in the small dining 
hall last Friday evening, Dr. Gos- 
sard gave the members an inspiring 
talk on the advantages of persever- 
ance. Professor Stokes spoke along 
the same line in advising the students 
to be diligent in the pursuance of 
their duties. The meeting was called 
to order by Patrizio, president of th" 
organization. A representative crowd 
was in attendance. 



'L" CLUB HOLDS 

PARTY IN GYMNASIUM 



The "L" Club of the school enter- 
tained the student body at an infor- 
mal party held last Saturday evening 
in the gymnasium. Dancing was the 
chief f orm of entertainment, the music 
being supplied by the orthophonic. It 
rendered a medley of dance selections 
accompanied by much static, as well 
as many popular hits of the week on 
the old reliable discs. 

Earl Wolf, the popular crooner of 
the campus, varied the program by 
giving a solo. He was accompanied 
by Miss Gemmel. 

A feature of the evening was the 
persistent and frequent cutting ex- 
hibited by several of the boys, the en- 
thusiasm created serving to add zest 
to the group. The party was well at- 
tended considering the fact that the 
Week-end crowd is usually sparse. All 
present expressed a desire for a re- 
petition of a similar party in the near 
future. 



BATTERY H LOSES 
CHARITY GAME 



LOCALS ENDED SEASON 
WITH A 33-0 
VICTORY 



Lebanon Valley's football team end- 
ed their season with a victory over 
Battery H, amateur champions of Leb- 
anon County, in the charity game last 
Saturday at the Bethlehem Steel Field 
in Lebanon. The final score was 33-0 
in favor of the Mylinmen. 

For one half, the game was score- 
less but the Blue and White eleven 
opened up their attack in the second 
half and ran up five touchdowns on 
their opponents. Mylin started the 
second team and left them in the firs L 
quarter. Although they gained much 
yardage they could not produce the 
scoring punch. Reeder showed up wel 1 
the first period making some nice 
gains and throwing beautiful passes. 

After being held during the second 
quarter, the varsity came back in the 
last half and swept Battery H off 
their feet. Two drives were staged 
in the third quarter, each one ending 
in a pass from Daub to Heller over 
the goal line. 'Lechthaler kicked one 
of the trys for point after touchdown. 

The (features of the game were 
Daub's run of forty yards and a pass 
to Sweeny Light which resulted in a 
gain of forty yards and a touchdown. 
Daub and George Nye, acting captain, 
scored the other six-pointers. Stone 
kicked two placements through the 
bars for the other two points. 

The present season was the most 
successful for Lebanon Valley in the 
past few years with four victories 
chalked up out of ten games. The 
local team outscored their opponents 
Continued on Page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1930 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31. .. .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

REPORT OKI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul fc>. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

1^ V'iE CUiiiiEGlENNE, a member 
oi Lie iiiuti cuiieyiate .Newspaper Asso- 
iation ui tne Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tne 
Act of March 3, 1879. 

CLUBS AND MORE CLUBb 



The complaint is rather general on 
the campus that there is a gross 
lack of cooperation in the traditional 
activities. A lagging, half-hearted in- 
terest seems to be all that the leaders 
of long-established organizations and 
movements can expect. 

Numerous reasons have been as-* 
signed to this condition. Some 01 
them are possibly true. Many are 
far wide of the mark. But we wondsr 
why someone has not taken account ol 
the large number of new organizations 
and movements that have sprung up 
like mushrooms within recent years. 

Out ui iaunecs ltsnouid be stated 
at once that some of these organiza- 
tions have already justified their ex- 
istence in an ample way. That others 
may justify their existence in the 
future is probable. But the facts are 
these: The amount of student co- 
operation available is a fixed quantity 
while the number of activities requir- 
ing student participation is on the in- 
crease. Under such circumstances, it 
is foolish to expect the same standards 
of cooperation as formerly obtained. 

It seems just a bit strange that as 
soon as half a dozen students get to- 
gether these days, the result is a club, 
with all the regulation officers, by- 
laws, etc., etc. Reminds one of the 
days when every vacant lot had its 
miniature "army" (we refer to the 
pre-golf era, of course), with a "cap- 
tain" all tricked out in dad's trench 
hat (or a replica thereof), a more or 
less sharply pointed stick for a sword 
and a half -preserved cap-pistol for ad- 
ditional protection. And if, per- 
chance, one failed to obtain the re- 
quisite support for the grand office 
of "captain," "lieutenant" or what- 
have-you ? there still remained the con- 
solation of starting a new "army." 

That something should be done to 
stop this foolish movement is self- 
evident. We heartily favor the for- 
mation of as many organizations as are 
necessary to properly handle the ex- 
tra-curricular activities of the cam- 
pus, but there is such a thing as a 
limit, and there should be such a 
thing as a means of determining when 
that limit has been reached, what new 
organizations shall be permitted, and 
what old ones shall be scrapped. Who 
has the courage to take a hand in the 
matter ? 



A WORD OF PRAISE 



The students in general and the 
team in particular deserve commenda- 
tion for the unselfish manner in which 
they gave their support to the charity 



game on Saturday. The cause was a 
worthy one, surely. The Lebanon 
Valley, rich as it is in the fruits of 
the earth, has seldom been stricken 
with so unfortunate a combination of 
circumstances as that which has at 
present impoverished so large a num- 
ber of families. 

The fact that a group of students 
is willing to contribute its share to- 
ward the welfare of a community with 
which it has little if any direct con- 
nection should go a long way toward 
removing the antagonistic attitude 
frequently assumed toward colleges. 
We hope that Saturday's game and 
the events leading up to it will help 
to dismiss from the minds of many 
the thought that the college student 
is in reality the uncivilized barbarian 
that fiction portrays him to be. 



THE STAR COURSE 



The Star Course Committe informs 
us that they have reecived from the 
campus this year, cooperation that 
is anything but what it should be 
Unless there is a decided change in 
the attitude of the student-body a 
financial loss is imminent. The Course 
will be completed this year regardless, 
but the Committee will be compelled 
to discontinue it in the future. 

Just why the students should fail to 
cooperate here it is difficult t see. 
The Comittee has always obtained an 
excellent type of production at very 
reasonable prices. The whole project, 
too, is undertaken for the benefit of 
the students themselves. N one else 
can possibly be affected by its success 
or failure. 

If you want a good, clean, first- 
-lass type of entertainment on the 
campus, get busy, students, and show 
the Committee what you can do nex. 
Tuesday night. And if you don't want 
■Miat sort f thing, tell the Committee 
so frankly and relieve them of their 
duties for the rest of Lebanon Valley'? 
history. Perhaps you would prefer 
the inconveniences of "thumbing" 
your way to Lebanon r Harrisburg to 
*ee a production for twice the nrice 
q.nd to return with a firm conviction 
fhfit "the show was rotten" and with- 
out so much as the privilege of bawl- 
ing somebody out about it. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



The regular literary session of Philo 
was called to order on Friday 5, by the 
Vice-President, Fred W. Mund. The 
Chaplain, Stuart Werner, then conduc- 
ted devotions. The first number was 
debate on the question, "Resolved that 
the slogan, "Buy Now," is economical- 
ly sound." The team taking the neg- 
ative position won the debate under 
the leadership of Robert Eshleman. 
His colleagues were Charles Kraybill 
and Joe Rhen. The affirmative team 
was led by Paul Evancoe and his col- 
leagues were Marvin Schell and Clyde 
Mentzer. The debate proved both in- 
teresting and instructive. 

The next number was a quartette. 
"Mother Macree," by Allen Ranck, 
Carl Myers, George Brubaker, and 
Paul Emenheiser. As an encore, 
George Brubaker sang, "As the Organ 
Plays at Twlight." Both of these 
numbers were excellent. Woodrow 
Delinger then gave a talk on "Living 
Thoughts." The talk was a combina- 
tion of the serious and foolish, and 
was enjoyed by all. Kermit Taylor 
followed with a talk on "Exams," dis- 
cussing the good and bad features of 
these tests. After the critic, Francis 
Barr, made his report, and after a 
few general remarks, the meeting was 
adjourned. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Fun, pep, enthusiasm — all were pre- 
dominant i actors in the Delphian 
meeting, Friday evening, when the 
Freshman girls presented their in- 
iatory program for the benefit of the 
old Delphians. 

The meeting opened with devotions 
conducted by Ruth Shroyer; "the di- 
versity of gifts" spoken of by St. 
Paul in Corinthian II served as the 
basic element for the chaplain's re- 
marks which wei'e quite practical, and 
were applied to the members of the 
society as a whole. 

After the devotional period, a skit 
prepared by Minna Wolf skill was pre- 
sented by a group of Freshmen girls. 
.The scene was laid in the Girl's Dor- 
mitory, Lebanon Valley College, Sep- 
t-ember 1930, and was typical of plea- 
santries indulged in by girls every- 
where. 

The various character impersona- 
tions were intensely interesting, and 
proved to be quite mirth-provoking 
to the audience; the Sophomore, the 
Junior, the Senior — all began to see 
themselves as others have seen them 
in the yesterdays of their college life. 
Music, dancing, eating, talking — and 
particularly talking, an art in which 
girls have always been superior — pre- 
vailed throughout the program. A 
piano duet was rendered by Thelma 
Shoop and Gem Gemmil; a lively tele- 
phone conversation with police head- 
quarters was conducted by Ruth Mark 
and Esther Smeltzer; several skillful 
dances were given by Evangeline Sal- 
erio; a popular vocal selection was 
sung by Leona Allen, and a second 
one was rendered by Regina Ailer and 
Dorothy Eby in the mournful tone of 
th^ homesick Freshman. 

The following anpeared in the 
program: — Viola Williams, Helen 
Lane, Thelma Shocp, Leona Allen. 
Winifred Miller, Evangeline Salerio, 
Kathryn Mawry, Gem Gemmil, Mar- 
jorie Miller, M?rgaret Lane, Mary 
Gossard, Regina Oiler, Dorothy Eby. 
Ruth Mark, Esther Siueitzer, Verna 
Gressinger, and Dorothy Jackson. 

Following the program, the critic. 
Marie Gelwicks. congratulated the new 
girls on the evenings accomplishments 
and expressed the desire that this 
same cooperation and fellowship might 
be manifested in the future. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetan Literary Society held 
a short business meeting last Friday 
evon'ng. The annual initiation which 
was scheduled for that date was called 
off in cooperation with the student 
Y. M. C. A. There were several Kalos 
desiring to attend the student con- 
ference of the Y. M. C. A. which was 
held at Dickinson College in Carlisle 
and in order to make it possible for a 
good number to be present the initia- 
tion was postponed. 

All new Kalos are urged to be pres- 
ent at the meeting Friday, December 
13th when the proposal initiation will 
be held. Goats, horses, and other ap- 
paratus have been arriving daily in 
carload lots. Hear ye Kalos! — Be on 
time Friday night. 



Y. W. NOTES 



"The Need for a Better World" was 
the theme of the Friendly Hour dis- 
cussion on Sunday evening, Decem- 
ber 6. Marie Gelwicks was in charge 
of the program. A piano prelude was 
played by Eulalie Morton. Several 
appropriate hymns were sung; and a 
very helpful devotional period was 
conducted by the leader. A vocal 
duet, "Ivory Palaces," was rendered 
in an inspiring manner by Regina Oil- 



er and Dorothy Ely. A talk on the 
theme was given by the leader who 
endeavored with the help of interest- 
ing illustrations, to point out the ex- 
isting need for a better world, and the 
part that can be played in helping 
to fulfill this need. Clippings relat- 
ing to the subject discussed, were 
also read by a number of girls pres- 
ent at the meeting. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



Annville, Pa. 
Now. 

Dear Joe Goof: 

Thanx for the letter. It certainly 
was terrible. I couldn't read a word, 
but don't worry you won't be able to 
read this anyway. If you do you're 
Joe Bass. 

What's new ? Nothing much. Last 
week Clio held their Anniversary. It 
>was good but the audience refused to 
keep quiet and insisted on interrupt- 
ing by seeking seats during the play. 
When on earth will these palookas 
learn that when a show is billed for 
eight o'clock it starts at that time 
and not latter? 

Joe Hutchinson says that the beans 
are to the army what sweet potatoes 
are to us. Maybe it's so. And Mund 
made the crack that there was no 
fresh meat around. Wotta life. 

Well we're getting lofty around here. 
They are going to pull a German plav 
for the edification of the masses. Ad- 
mission isn't, so you can come. Bring 
the Babe it'll do her good. No sauer- 
kraut however. 

Basket ball season has started. 
Plenty of men showed up, but it won't 
be long now. 

And don't accept cigarettes from 
James Dominic Frevola, even if he in- 
sists that you have one. They're 
loaded. 

Bob McKusker, the Lebanon Valley 
lyricist wrote a letter to his one and 
only the other night. This is the way 
it went. 

11:30 Saturday Night. 

My Darlin', 

IF I COULD BE WITH YOU ONE 
HOUR TONIGHT, SOMEWHERE IN 
OLD WYOMING, SWINGING IN A 
HAMMOCK UNDER A TEXAS 
MOON. 

I AM YOURS, 

BOB. 

Wotta guy. He can't seem to get 
away from the song influence. I won- 
der why? 

Heard all about the P-J Club meet- 
ing the other night. No men were 
present. 

I asked a Sophomore who wrote Ken - 
ilworth. I am still breathing hard 
from the workout. 

Well we sorta knocked the militia 
about last Saturday. And some fel- 
lows even had the courage to back 
them. 

And whether you know it or not 
this is the contributor's column. If 
you have anything to say write it 
down on a piece of paper and slip it 
under the door of the La Vie office 
We'll be much obliged. 

Having six classes tomorrow and 
none of them prepared I might as 
well pull over to the curb and go to 
bed. 

Your old pal, 
JOE SNOOP. 



Mrs. J. M. Keith-Miller, who van- 
ished while on a flight from Havana 
to Miami, arrived in port at Nassau, 
on Monday, after being rescued from 
her collapsible raft b\ a small nsmnp 
vessel. All nopes for her safety had 
been given up. 



Sport Shots 



Well we lost to Albright but \y 



hav e nothing to be ashamed of 



put up a good fight and long will th ey 
remember that game — I wonder jf 
some of their stars are still shining 
after so many of their lights went 
out? 



Daub in his final intercollegiate tilt 
made the most spectacular run of the 
day when he galloped 85 yards f 0r 
our only touchdown. That was a beau- 
tiful run Gus — We'll miss you next 
year. 



Patrizio, Kelly and Wood also play, 
ed a wonderful game — L. V. C. will 
surely miss these boys when the call 
for football candidates is given next 
year. 



Despite the cold weather quite a 
few loyal rooters were present at 
Reading. That's the spirit gang — Why 
not more of it? 



Battery H buried L. V. C. in a pre- 
game celebration at Lebanon, Friday 
night. Evidently they forgot to cover 
us properly because w& ^eemed very 
much alive auring the second half. 



It has been rumored that a few de- 
monstrations like the one held in Leb- 
anon last Wednesday night might 
help pep up things around the cam* 
pus for other games — I wonder if it's 
worth thinking about? 



Cal Heller was high scorer against 
Battery H. He made two touchdowns 
while /"Njyje, Dau^>, and Light each 
crashed the goal line once. 



Basketball is in the lime light now— 
The first practice was held Tuesday. 
Quite a few likely prospects report- 
ed and it looks as though we are go- 
ing to turn out another great team. 



We play only four home games in 
basketball this year but the support 
of the student body is needed for all 
of the games. We followed them on 
the gridiron. Let's give them support 
on the court. 



The center position is drawing the 
most candidates it seems this year. 
Looks as though our letter men are 
going to have to fight to hold their 
positions. 



The squad will work out in the 
Alumni "ice box" for the next few 
days but before they get down to real 
work they will have to obtain a larger 
court. The High School gym most 
likely. 



It won't be long now before the 
boys will be whooping it out on the 
court, so let's get our cheering voices 
in shape — We want a winning team 
and we must do are part. Go to ft 
fellows. Find the basket. 



on 



With the death of "Mother" J<> neS ' 
labor has lost one of its most spectac- 
ular champions. She was 100 yea 1 ^ 
old. For 60 years Mother Jones ^ 
the leader in strikes, appearing 

battlefront in half a dozen states- 

the 

Her activities were known from 
coal fields of Pennsylvania to 
mountains of Colorado. Her fi* llUr * 
spirit first asserted itself in the f aI ^ 
ous Hay-market riot in Chicag°» 
1836, and ended in 1922, when H lneS 
forced her into retirement. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 




Miss Gladys Hopple, '28, daughter 
of Rev. and Mrs. W. B. Hoppel, of 
Lebanon, and H. Ross Flowers, of 
Hathaway Park were married, Thurs- 
day .'evening-, November :by the 
bride's father, in the First Reformed 
Church of which Rev. Hoppel is pastor 



Ann — Do you go caroling ? 

Mary Margaret — Sure, I carry the books. 

LVC 



Berkov — Ever hear the Irish bulldog's love song? 
Dechert — No, what is it? 
Berkov — "Litte r by Litter." 

LVC 



Hughes — I put my arm around my girl six times tonight. 
Rawhouser — What a big arm you have! 

LVC 

"Who are you pushing?' 

"I don't know. What's your name?" 

LVC 



Waiter — And the lobster, madam? 
Girl — Oh, he'll order for himself. 



-LVC- 



Lee — Will you marry me? 

Mary — Why, you couldn't keep me in handkerchiefs. 

Lee — Well, you don't expect to have a cold the rest of your life, do you? 

LVC 



Red — How did you find the weather while you were away? 
Fred — Just went outside, and there it was. 

LVC 



"Doctor, there are times when I feel like killing myself. What on earth 
shall I do?" 

.. "Leave it to me, madam." 

LVC 



A waiter says he walks over twelve miles a day in the course of his 
duties. That is carrying things too far. 

LVC 

Warner — Making your own cigarettes? 

Ulrich — Yes, doctor says I must get more exercise. 

LVC 

"Where does she get her good looks?" 
"From her dad." 
"Handsome man, eh?" 
"No—druggist!" 

LVC 



She was only a printer's daughter, but he liked her type. 

LVC 

Did you improve financially after marrying?" 

"Yes, my wife demanded money the first day, and I've been advancing 
steadily ever since.' 

LVC 



Taylor— It's to be a battle of wits. 

Waughtel — How brave of you, to go unarmed. 

LVC 

"My gi r i i s a decided blonde." 
Yes, I was with her when she decided." 



B ELIEVE IT OR NOT- 



-LVC- 



Newlyweds like to call each other darling and pet. 



^ e best way for a girl to keep a man at a distance is for her to chase 

Girls who wear cotton stockens are either over-confident or don't give 
a darn. 1 1 ! 



Some students hav e just returned from their holidays. Others are 
Orally gl , 



loomy. 



About the only time the modern girl tries to be an angel is when she 



iving 



a car. 



On November 12, Rev. D. LeRoy 
Fegley, pastor of the Allentown Lin- 
den Street United Brethren Church 
and Miss Mildred Irene Woodside of 
Lykens, Pennsylvania, were married at 
Lykens. Rev. I. Moyer Hershey, D. D 
of Philadelphia, performed the cere- 
mony. The bride for the past six 
years has been missionary superin- 
tendent of the East Pennsylvania 
Conference Summer Assembly. The 
groom after his graduation here com- 
pleted his training in the Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 



At a delightful bridge party given 
at her home, Saturday, November 29, 
in Hummelstown, Miss Anne Hershey 
'30, announced her engagement to 
:J. Witmer Allwein also of the class 
of '30. Miss Hershey is at present 
teaching in Pennsylvania Grove, New 
Jersey. Mr Allwein is taking further 
training at Temple University, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



Faculty Notes 



We note with pleasure the return 
of Dr. and Mrs. Gossard. ..Dr. Gos- 
sard spoke in chapel on Monday morn- 
ing for the first time in several weeks. 

We hope his recovery is complete 
and permanent. 



A banquet in honor of Dr. Gossard 
will be held at Sinking Springs, Pa., 
on Friday evening, December 12th. 
The faculty are all expecting to be 
present for a very delightful affair. 



Dr. Butterwick and Dr. Light last 
week attended the student-faculty Y. 
M. C. A. Conference at Carlisle, Pa. 



ARTISTS' SUPPLIES 

Canvas, Parchment, Japanese Tissue, 
Fabriano White and Grey Charcoal 
Papers, Whatman's Hot and Cold- 
pressed Papers, Oil, Water and 
Decora Colors, Brushes, Atomizers, 
China Palettes, Drawing Boards, 
Colored Crayons and Pencils. 
All high grade materials 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Chicagoan's home is just about anywhere he hangs his gat. 



THIS IS A QUALITY SHOE 
REPAIR SHOP 

Service, Workmanship and Materials 
Hand Stitching 

W. D. ELLIOTT, JR. 

140 N. Railroad St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



PRINTING— 

Stationery, Announcements. 
Publications, Catalogues, 
Booklets, Etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Annville - Penna. 



TOURIST BELL PHONE 

ACCOMMODATIONS ANNVILLE 69-R-13 

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Wm. Penn Highway, 4 Miles West of Lebanon, Pa. 
We Cater To Private Parties and Banquets 
Special Dinners and A La Carte Service 
Ample Parking Space We Serve With a Smile 




KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WAS HE R 
COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

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328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



Annville, Pa. 



SHEET MUSIC MUSICAL BOOKS 

MUSICAL GOODS VICTOR RECORDS 

VICTOR RADIOS 

Miller's Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



ISN'T IT 

TIME 
YOU • • • 




TELEPHONED 

<JMother and "Dad 





BRIGHTEN 

this- evening and 

several tomorrows! 

The cheering effects of a telephone chat 
with the home folks are much more last- 
ing than most of the Campus Pleasures. 
For several tomorrows, you will feel the 
thrill of those voices in your ear, and they 
will feel the thrill of yours. 
We are moved to use those time-tried 
words, "a trial will convince you." 
Make a date to telephone home on a 
certain evening every week. 
Just give the Operator your home tele- 
phone number and stay on the line. 
{Charges may be reversed.) 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1930 



JUNIOR PLAY ON 

UNUSUAL SUCCESS 



(Continued from Page 1) 



step, every stir of hers aided in mak- 
ing it successful. 

Paul Keene, as Henry Higgins, the 
young professor, was all that might 
have been asked of his part. Young 
impetuous, unthinking, rather rude, 
all he carried out perfectly. His car- 
riage, his manner, his exceptional ease 
on the stage, his voice, all tended to 
make him the hero of the evening. 
Dashing, very much alive, exaspera- 
ting, he held our interest and apt at- 
tention throughout the entire play. 

As the quiet, middle-aged, confirm- 
ed bachelor, James Leathern perform- 
ed well. His part called for no out- 
bursts as did the professor's but in 
his own, quiet, gentle way he left his 
impress on our minds as we watched 
him on the stage. 

John Morris as Alfred Doolittle, 
Eliza's father, carried out his part 
exceedingly well, both as the garbage 
man and as the public lecturer. His 
speeches were filled with humor which 
was uncommonly well-received. His 
characterization was individual, we 
realize, and as such he will be long 
remembered. 

As the mother of Higgins, Ann Es- 
benshade, gave a good performance 
Elizabeth Engle as Mrs. Hill a soc- 
iety woman, Cynthia Bensing, as Miss 
Hill her daughter, Arthur Reeder a; 
Freddie Hill, her son, all in their diff- 
erent roles gave very good portrayals 
Mrs. Pierce, the housekeeper of Hig 
gins, in the person of Eualalie Mortor 
was well-presented. Others in th 
play as the parlor maid, Mary Rup~. 
and the bystanders, Kermit Taylor 
Frederick Mund, Robert M^Cuske 1 
helped the success of the play as a 
whole. 

The Junior Class is deeply indebted 
t Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace for hte 
untiring efforts in the production o 
the play. Mrs. Samuel C. Savior 
Kreamer Bros., the Clionian Literal 
Society, and many others who contri 
buted toward the success of the pr" 
duction deserve special thanks. 



BATTERY H LOSES 

CHARITY GAMF 



(Continued from Page 1) 



113 to 110 points. Daub was %hr 
leading scorer with four touchdown 
and one extra point. Heller had threr 
and "Sweeny" Light two six-pointer? 
while eight other men had one apiece 

The summary: 
L. V. C. Battery H 

Shaeffer L. E. Souders 

Sprenkle L. T. Hill 

Moris L. G. Henry 

Murphy C. Hoke 

Kleinfelter R. G. Emerich 
Boyer R. T. Eckert 

Kandrat R. E. T. Heath 

Reeder Q. B. Young 

Abrams H. B. B. Heath. 

Feeser H. B. Hess 

Nye F. B. Gassert 

L. V. C H 13 20—33 

Battery H 0—0 

Touchdowns — Heller, 2; Daub, S. 
Light, Nye. Points after touchdown, 
Lechthaler, Stone, 2. 

Substitutions — L. V. C. Stewart for 
Shaeffer, Stone for Sprenkle, Lech- 
thaler for Morris, Wogan for Murphy, 
Wood for Kleinfelter, Kelly for Boyer, 
Heller for Kandrat, Patrizio for Reed- 
er, Daub for Abrams, M. Light for 
Feeser, S. Light for Nye, Thrush for 
Stewart, Orsino for M. Light, Brown 
for Wood, Wykoff for Patrizio. 



DAUB MAKES 

SPECTACULAR RUN 



(Continued from Page 1) 



accurate passes the ball was put on 
Albright's nine-yard line and first 
down. Two plays gained only two 
yards and a pass was grounded in the 
end zone giving Albright the ball and 
ending the attack. 

From then until the end, L. V.'s 
passes were batted down or inter- 
cepted and the game ended without 
further score. The boys played their 
best game of the season as each one 
did his work well. With a little bet- 
cer luck the result would have been 
totally different from what it was. 

The lineup: 
L. V. C. Albright 
Thrush L. E. Karlip 

Stone L. T. Carney 

Lechthaler L. G. Schaeffer 
Wogan C. F. Hatton 

Wood R. G. Kozlowski 

Kelly R. T. Suydam 

Stewart R. E. A. Dauu 

Patrizio Q. B. Emmeu 

L. Daub H. B. Hains 

M. Light H. B. L. Hatton 

S. Light F. B. Weigle 

L. V. C 6 0—6 

Albright 6 6—12 

L. Daub, L. Hatton, 2. 

Substitutions — L. V.: Heller for 
Stewart, Slack for M. Light, Orsino 
for Slack, M. Light for Slack, Stewart 
for Thrush, Klinefelter for Lechthaler. 
Morris for Wood, Murphy for Wogan, 
Abrams for M. Light. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Senator-elect James J. Davis from 
Pennsylvania, did not present himself 
when the seventy-first session con- 
vened. Chairman Nye, North Dakota 
of the Senate Campaign funds com 
mittee, demands that he stand aside 
pending inquiry of the expenditure in 
behalf of the Davis-Brown Ticket, al- 
ready found to total $368,000. 



Miss Ruth Nichols, Rye, N. Y., 
society woman, has flown from New 
York to Burbank, California, in 16 
hours 59 y 2 minutes. This is faster 
than any woman has crossed the 
United States before and only slightly 
more than two hours slower than the 
speed mark of Capt. Frank M. Hawk : 
last August. 



fm 



A-l SKIL* 
WORKS WONDERS 




BEFORE 

ANNVII 



207 W. Main 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



One of the eight Russian engineers 
on trial for high treason stated in 
his trial that Soviet Russia would 
not get ahead of the United States in 
technical production for many years. 



Sandwiches Sodas 

EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE 

ICE CREAM 
C'gars Cigarettes 



H. GOODMAN & SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and l ies 



Grimm s Book Store 

Try us for your needs 

GIFT SUGGESTIONS FOR 
CHRISTMAS 

RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
Pearls 

SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
ERY with College or Soc- 
iety Seals 



THE CROAKER 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



JUST RECEIVED A FRESH SUPPLY OF 
WHITMAN'S CHRISTMAS BOXES 

The Pennway 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



For advanced HOLIDAY FROCKS 
DON'T FAIL TO VISIT 

Rose Singer Shop 

761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



Once on the edge of a pleasant pool, 
Under a bank where 'twas dark and 
cool; 

Where bushes over the water hunsi: 
And rushes nodded and grasses swung 
Just where the crick flowed over the 
bog, 

There lived a grump and mean old 
frog 

Who'd set all day in the mud and soak 
And jest do nothing but croak and 
croak! 

Then a blackbird hollered, "I say, yer 
know 

What's the matter down there below?' 
The frog says, "Mine is an orful lot! — 
Nuthin' but dirt, and mud and slime 
For me to look at jest all the time! — 
It's a dirty world!" so the ole fool 
spoke, 

"Croakerty — Croakerty — Croakerty 
—Croak!" 

"But you've lookin' down!" the black- 
bird said; 



Look at the blossoms over head; 
Look at the lovely summer skies; 
Look at the bees and butterflies, — . 
Look up, young feller; why, bless ^y 
soul, 

Your lookin' down in a muskrat hole!" 
But still, with a gurglin' sob and 
choke, 

The blamed ole critter would only 
croak. 

And a wise ole turtle who boarded 
near 

Sez to the blackbird, "Friend* Se€ 
here, 

Don't shed no tears over him for he- 
Is low-down jest cause he likes to be! 
He's one of them kind er chumps that's 
glad 

To be so miserable-like and sad! 
I'll tell you something that ain't no 
joke, 

Don't waste no sorrow on folks that 
croak!" 

(Author Unknown). 



—Shaeffer' s Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

xj A T> T>T?T >C The Gift Store of Lebanon 
rl AKrlLJL »3 757-759 Cumberland Street 

Special Rate oh Portraits to Students 



CLOTHING O F QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



PRINTING 

When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville - p a . 



MENS 

Horse Hide Leather Coats, Shoes 
Underwear, Sweaters Srirts and 
Ties. 

LADIES 
(Silk Undies, Slk Hose, Stap Sand- 
lals, Pumps, Gloves. 
COURTESY — SERVICE 

J. F. BERLEW 

9-11 West Main Street. 
Annville, Pa. 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



Chefs 

House of Good 
Foods 

Wra. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 




Meals Served at AH Hours 
Our Specialty 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 



For Quality 

BAKED PRODUCTS 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



4 



MERRY CHRISTMAS 

AND A 
JOYOUS NEW YEAR 



lalfieCall^iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



TACK TK:E QUITTTE. 
BE 

PHOTOGRAPHED! 



VOLUME VII 



AXNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1930 



No. 1C 



MEN PREPARE FOR 
CAGE SEASON 

SCHEDULE OF THIS YEAR 
INCLUDES FIVE HOME 
GAMES 



THRUSH-WAGNER 

NUPTIALS ANNOUNCED 



With the close of the football sea 
son and the cold weather of winter 
getting a firm grip, the thoughts of 
the sport world are turning to basket 
ball. Each evening Coach Mylin is 
giving his squad a workout in prepara- 
tion for the difficult schedule ahead 

Many colleges have already started 
playing games but Lebanon Valley 
will not swing into action until the 
Saturday after the Christmas vaca- 
tion when the team journeys to Eas 
ton to play the Lafayette College 
quintet. 

When practise started about two 
weeks ago, a promising squad report- 
ed for the team . Three of last year's 
regulars are back in uniform and there 
are many likely candidates for the 
other positions. 

"Cal" Heller will again hold down 
the center position where he has been 
so valuable for the past two years. 
"Bob" Stewart and "Sweeny" Light, 
forward and guard respectively, are 
the other two regulars from last year. 
Each of these men should have little 
difficulty in landing their berths. 

"Olie" Orsino, forward, and "Red" 
Wogan and Earl Frey seem to have 
the inside track for the remaining 
positions. Fred Morrison, Fernersler, 
and Lee Stone should also see plenty 
of action during the season. 

In addition there are quite ; 
newcomers wno will make the gcin 
tough for the regulars. Among these 
are Sprenkle, Shrum, Williams, Max 
Lijrht, Volkins, Wykoff, Murphy and 

Continued on Page 4) 



Religion and science 
discussed by students 



"Religion and Science," was the 
subject discussed at a meeting of the 
Life Work Recruits on Thursday, Dec- 
ember 11. Ray Harris, the president, 
°Pened the meeting with a song, and 
then Chester Goodman conducted th* 
devotional exercise, reading scripture 
a *id offering prayer. The group was 
then especially favored in hearing se- 
ctions on the guitar by Gietna Draw- 
baugh. 

*red W. Mund then gave a talk on 

<Rel igion and Science." He likened 

them to two growing children, advanc- 

n & step by step together, yet ordered 

J>y necessity to hold the others hand. 

e also recommended a tolerant at 

#ade for both scientist and theolo- 

^ la n, and stressed the advisability of 

adapting one's thought to the latest 

Scov eries in both science and reli- 
gion. 

Following this thought provoking 
a lengthy discussion was held 
^ncerning the problems resulting 
^ ro m the present age of thought, in- 
. stl £ation and reasoning. The meet- 
n £ was closed with the customary 
c | rc le of prayer, each member parti- 
Cl Pating. 



The campus cupid has been un- 
usually active this year. La Vie has 
just been informed that his latest is 
the marriage of Miss Gladys C. Wag- 
ner, class of '33 to Mr. Bernard E. 
Thrush, class of '32. The ceremony 
was performed by Reverend Musser 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
of Frederick, Maryland, on November 
10, 1930. Mr. Kelley, one of our prom- 
inent seniors, acted as best man and 
third member of the bridal party. A 
short auto trip supplanted the honey- 
moon, which has been delayed until 
the coming summer. 

The bride, formerly of Palmyra, is 
now living at the home of the groom 
in Steelton, while Mr. Thrush is stilJ 
occupying his room in the men's dor- 
mitory between trips to the home- 
stead, and as yet has not divulged his 
plans for the future. 

The campus unites in extending to 
the newly-weds its very best wishes 
for a successful and happy future. • 



STAR COORSE IS 
WELLOTENDED 

DRAMATIC CARTOONIST 
GIVES SKILLFUL 
PERFORMANCE 



ANNOAL BANQUET 
ENJOYED BY ALL 

GOOD CHEER ABOUNDS 
AT ANNUAL 
EVENT 



PLANS ARE COMPLETED 
FCE GERMAN PAGEANT 



The. annual Christmas banquet was 
held on Wednesday evening at 5:45 
in the college dining hall. The ban- 
quet was of the usual type, plenty to 
eat, plenty to talk about and plenty 
to laugh at. 

In the large dining hali Mr. Trezise 
was Master of the toasts and he 
certainly had them mastered, io: 
for everytime he spoke he aroused 
laughter from all sides. Miss Ethel 
Hower, speaking in behalf of the class 
of '31, expressed very well the feeling 
cf her class in her toasts. Mr. George 
Nye was very good in reading in 
negro dialect his many laughable joK- 
ss. Miss Trula Koch of the class of 
'33 also did very well in giving her 
class's toast in the negro dialect. Mr. 
(continued on page 4) 



PRESIDENT ENTERTAINS 
FACULTY AT CHEF'S 



One of the best Star Course num- 
bers ever witnessed at Lebanon Val- 
ley was presented, Tuesday, December 
16 by John E. Bockewitz, the drama- 
tic cartoonist. In plain words, Mr. 
Bockewitz "knew his chalk," creating 
most beautiful pictures with a few 
deft strokes. He cleverly avoided tir- 
ing his audience by reciting as he 
worked on the easels; using wit on 
the poems from which his drawings 
were taken. 

Standing before the two gigantic 
easels which he uses, Mr. Bockewitz 
skillfully sketched various pictures, re- 
presenting various types in life. Per- 
haps the ones which best showed Bock- 
ewitz's great art and pleased the audi- 
ence most were Noyes' "The Highway- 
men," Paynes' "Home, Sweet Home," 
and "Cowboy Dan." These scenes 
were made very beautiful b^ the mar- 
velous vari-colored lighting effects, 
which brought numerous murmurs of 
approval from the appreciative audi- 
ence. For novelty, Mr. Bockewitz 
wrote such words as Philadelphia and 
Czecho-Slovakia upside down on his 
sheet. Tearing off the sheet, he turn- 
ed it about and there were the words 
as they should be. 

There can be no doubt that Bocke 
witz is one of the greatest cartoonist; 
and entertainers who has ever stood 
before an audience. His popularity 
here was shown by the group which 
crowded the stage after the perfor- 
mance in an effort to obtain one of 
his sketches or to question him 
about his work. His work of art if 
to be commended as all comments o r 
the audience were in his favor. 



The Facufty Banquet .riven by Dr 
Gossard which was held at Chef's 
Place" in Sinking- Spring;', Pa., was s 
successful affair if we may judge from 
the various reports of those present 
Every member of th e faculty as we! 1 
as wives of the faculty were present 
with the exception of Miss Wallace 
and Miss Meyers, who were unable to 
attend. There were no lengthy toasts 
or speeches, no jokes or detailed re- 
ports given. The main objective of 
each person being to banquet royally 

Dr. and Mrs. Gossard were both 
present which indeed gladdened thr 
hearts of all. Their absences whicl 
have been more frequent than we 
would have them, are always deeply 
regretted for the kindly interest of 
Dr. Gossard and the charm and af- 
fability of Mrs. Gossard are valuable 
to all. 



On Thursday evening at 8:00 P. M. 
the Deutsche Verein will present in 
ihe chapel a Christmas Program, 
winch will consist of a German solo, 
'Glory to God in the Highest," by Miss 
rifelSH Eddy, a snort history of tne 
German onnsunas by Miss Edna 
^laxiy, German Christmas carols by 
u chorus and the audience, and a Ger- 
man play. 

The theme oi the play is, of course, 
the Christmas story, beginning with 
'Hie appearance of the angel Gabriel, 
*n.ea part is played by Augusta 
Trachte to Mary, played by Alma Bin- 
ner. The rejection of the couple at 
the inn is especially stressed. The 
part of the inn-keeper, is played by 
Waiter Krumbiegel, and his wife is 
Margaret Pans. Franklin Glass- 
moyer is playing in the role of Joseph 
while Marie Ehrgott, Helen Yingst, 
and Violet Morton are the three kings 
and Dorothy Snyder, Luella Umber- 
ger and Kathryn Gockley are the 
shepherds. Miss Ethel Hower takes 
the part of a monk who announces 
the play and pronounces a benedic- 
tion. 

The coaching of *<he play is under 
the direction of Dr. Lietzau, who is 
spending a great deal of time with 
the cast in getting the play ready for 
presentation. We indeed hope that 
there will be a large and apprecia- 
tive audience to insure the success 
of the program. 



CAMPUS ENJOYS 
CHRISTMAS PLAY 

PAGEANT IS ONE OF 
YEAR'S DRAMATIC 
SUCCESSES 



The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
presented "In The Light of The Star," 
a Christmas play by Agnes Emelie 
Peterson in Engle Hall, Wednesday 
evening, December 17, 1930 at 8:00 
P. M. 

The story takes place in England 
on Christmas Eve. Sir Hurbert Burn- 
hane has lost the spirit of Christmas 
during the eight years that have elap- 
sed since the death of his wife and 
will not allow any semblance of Christ- 
mas about the home. The story con- 
cerns the son of Sir Hurbert who has 
been crippled because of his father':, 
anger. The little boy curls up in a 
chair to await the coming of the chim- 
es and bells of midnight. He falls 
asleep and dreams the story of the 
birth of Christ which a servant Peuf- 
Continued on Page 4) 



SOPHS ENTERTAIN 
AT HOTEL WEIMER 

SECOND YEAR PROM 
ATTRACTS LARGE 
NUMBER 



The Sophomores broke the ice for 
the out-of-town dances when they held 
^heir Promenade in the Hotel Weimer 
in Lebanon last Saturday. Art Zeller 
and his orchestra supplied a neat ar- 
ray of populars which well pleased the 
dancing crowd. 

The party was chaperoned by Prof- 
essors Johnson, Stokes, and Ohl, all 
of whom proved to be amiable partici- 
pants. A most sociable and enthusi- 
astic assembly attended the affair, and, 
acording to reports, all had a most 
enjoyable evening. The Sophomores 
also report a financial success which, 
while not impossible to attain, is 
quite rare. Congratulations Sophs, 
you're doing yours for a bigger and 
better. 

It has been the growing custom 
for the various classes of the school 
to foster a social affair of some type 
or other during the school year. 
These functions have varied from 
cthe time-worn plays to the cabaret 
given by the Juniors of last year, 
and each seems to suit that element 
of the student body which enjoys 
its type of entertainment. 



DAY STUDENTS 
HOLDJANQUET 

ADD NEW FEATURE TO 
CAMPUS HOLIDAY 
ACTIVITIES 

The first annual Christmas banquet of 
the Day Students of L. V. C. was held 
at the Hotel Weimer in Lebanon on 
Monday night, December 15, at seven 
o'clock. Fifty-eight, including the 
members of the faculty and the chap- 
erones, who were Prof, and Mrs. 
Grimm, Miss Gillespie, Miss Fencil 
and Professor Behney, were present. 
Professor Behney offered grace, after 
which was served a delicious turkey 
dinner. 

Edgar Meiser, who acted as toast- 
master very cleverly introduced the 
speakers of the evening. The first 
speaker was Henry Berkov who re- 
presented the Senior class. Next, Al- 
fred Gibble, a representative of the 
Tunior class entertained the banque- 
teers with his revelations of male Day 
Student College life. To vary the pro- 
Tram, the honored guest of the even- 
ing, Mr. William Saunders, of Harris- 
burg, gave a dexterous dancing act 
which was greatly enjoyed. Then 
Margaret Light, in a few words, re- 
presented th e Senior girls, followed 
by Elizabeth Shaak speaking for the 
Freshmen. Professor Grimm respond- 
ed to the toast-master's request with 
a delightful repartie to climax the 
speechse of the evening. The next 
feature on the program was a novelty 
number, clever and original, handled 
by Gardner Saylor, in his usual witty 
way. The remainder of the evening 
was spent in dancing and playing 
cards. 

Altho this was an innovation in 
L. V. C. history, the response of the 
students is to be commended and en- 
couraged. The fine feeling of fellow- 
ship, it is hoped, will continue thru- 
out the year and make this, the first 
Day Student Christmas banquet one 
never-to-be-forgotten event. 



FITZGERALD DISCUSSES 
LIFE OF RAIL MAGNATE 



Last Thursday, the campus was hon- 
ored by the presence of Mr. J. M. 
Fitzgerald, assistant to the chairman 
of the Committee on Public Relations 
of the Eastern Railways Association. 
Mr. Fitzgerald spoke in chapel dur- 
ing the regular period and also ad-, 
dressed the students in the Depart- 
ment of Business Administration on 
several occasions later in the day. 

The chapel address was most skill- 
fully presented. Mr. Fitzgerald's sub- 
ject was the life of J. J. Hill, a former 
railway magnate, born in Canada but 
having devoted the major part of his 
life to work in America, the founder 
of the Great Northern Pacific and 
Pacific systems. His addi*esses to the 
busines administration students dealt 
with pipe lines, inland waterways and 
New York marketing. 

Seldom has the campus heard more 
skillful presentations. Mr. Fitzgerald 
has addressed local audiences on pre- 
(continued from page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1930 



^aWxt (Eallegtentie 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Russel Etter, '31 Editor-in-Chief 

Ruth Liller, '31 Associate Editor 

R. Roudabush, '31 ... .Associate Editor 
R. Morgan, '31 Managing Editor 

RE PORTO EI AL STAFF 

Robert Eshleman, '31. 
Ruth Shroyer, '32 
Hilda Buckley, 32 

Walter Krumbeigel, '33.Gen'l Reporter 

Mary Goshert, '32 Conservatory 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 Athletic 

Dorothy Garber, '32 Clionian 

Mary Epply, '32 Delphian 

Percy Clements, '33 Kalozetean 

Fred Mund, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

G. Becker, '31 Business Manager 

P. Keene, '32.. Asst. Business Manager 

C. Wise, '31 Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math, Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



HOME GAMES 



THE SEASON'S GREETINGS 



The usual practice for editors is tr- 
devote a column or so to an edifyinf 
dissertation upon the subject indicat- 
ed in the caption, "whereby the edi- 
tor doth contract writers cramp, the 
brethren and sisters are bored to 
death by the lack of originality there- 
of, and the whole Holiday Spirit doth 
suffer loss." 

Now since you have been good child 
ren, we're going to forget that w\ 
are editors and simply remind you 
that there are a lot of opportunitie 
for giving instead of exchanging gifts 
this year, and that the La Vie Col 
leginne wishes you a Very Merry 
Christmas and a Most Prosperous 
New Year. 



A GOOD SUGGESTION 



The suggestion recently made by 
Dr. Butterwick that some measures be 
taken to more thoroughly develop 
among the students the art of conver- 
sation we consider a good one. Ex- 
amples are legirn of the student who 
leaves college with a knowledge in his 
field that is most complete, and yet 
without having ever acquired the 
ability to converse with others intel- 
ligently and entertaingly. In the 
class-room, seminar or laboratory he 
can speak fluently, but in the drawing- 
room he stutters and stammers in con- 
fusion, to his own great dismay and 
the imitation of his fellows. 

How can the matter best be taken 
icare of? Dr. "Butterwick suggest an 
organization, a sort of club. Given 
the proper amount of support, he of- 
fers to sponser such an organization. 
We can think of no better means; nor 
could we suggest a more expert spon- 
sor. It remains to be seen how many 
of us are willing to try at least to 
discord the cheap, loving, slang of 
the modern vogue for a more pleas- 
ing, more sensible kind of conversa- 
tion. 



THE BULLETIN BOARD 



Why the daily bulletin board in the 
main hallway of the Administration 
Building? It is certainly a very fine 
specimen; we suppose its installation 
involved the expenditure of a bit of 
cash. But why is it not being used ? 
Will Santa Claus please send us some- 
one who will see to it that the calen- 
dar of daily and weekly events is 
posted? Or must we wait until the 
time for the publication of semester 
grades to see the contraption put to 
some use? 



We observe that the schedule for 
the basketball season this year con- 
tains a large proportion of home 
games. We think the campus will 
welcome this news, especially in view 
of the agitation for more home games 
in football. It is a question, however, 
whether expectation or fulfillment 
shall prove to be the more enjoyable. 

Are we going to give the court more 
efficient support than we gave the 
gridiron ? Are we going to throw the 
brick-bats at the team and the bou- 
quets in the ash-can? We're getting 
what we've been hollering for; let's 
show our appreciation by turning out 
100% and backing the men for all 
we're worth. 



CAMPUS QUILLS 



I looked across the campus 

And whom did I see 

Trotting to the P. O. 

Warbling merrily? 

Not Speg, not Zech, 

Nor Moose by heck, 

But that dainty miss, H. T. 



(Editor's Note: All extra punctua- 
tion by way of ancient tomatoes, eggs, 
etc., is to be supplied at the option of 
th« reader.) 



I went into the Dorm, 
And tried to bum a butt, 
Then came flying out again 
A very much wiser mutt. 



But one thing I noticed 
In my brief stay there; 
The evidence of Radios 
Booming everywhere. 



Stew and Wogan have the loudest, 
Shellenberger's is the proudest 
Salek, Shrope and all the rest — 
Each claims his to be the best. 
Which one is I can not tell, 
To me they all sound like — 



Shellenberger went to Lancaster 
last Saturday and made the bucks 
driving in strayed, lost and stolen 
trolley cars. 



Yesterday I heard one say 
"I love you very much." 
It did not sound like you or me, 
But like Ioway Dutch. 



(Editor's Note: Mere punctuation.) 



I went to Alfred Kuhnert 
Not very long ago, 
And he told me the story of 
Conservatory Joe. 



It seems that little Ewalt 
Locks the doors at night, 
And of course occasionally 
Takes in quite a sight. 



(A word to the wise 
Is enough, I surmise, 
But if it's not true 
It's vacation for you.) 



And now that Xmas is around 
Suggestions are the thing. 
I hear that many of the boys 
Are going to buy the ring. 



Well, I intended to write the whole 
column in the above manner, but 
someone saw it and discouraged the 
attempt. So I'll have to chuck it un- 
til next Spring. That is, of course, 
if I'm not booted out of this job. 



Also the Editor bawled me out and 
said that this was the social column 
and that I should stick to that field. 
So here goes. 



Speg spent the Sabbath in bed. 



The committee who arranged the 
Christmas banquet seating is still 
raving. 



The College will desist operations 
from December 20, 1930 until Jan- 
uary 5, 1931. 

There will b e no La Vies published 
during the holidays. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



99 and 44-100% of the Freshmen 
Class went home over the week-end. 
They always do. 



A very charming Christmas party 
was held in Delphian Hall, Friday 
evening, December 12, at seven o'clock. 
The room was artistically decorated 
with trees, and evergreens and burn- 
ing candles; in the midst of this ap- 
propriate setting the skit, entitled 
"The Visit of the Christmas Angel," 
was presented. The story which was 
distinctively one from Old English 
folk-lore, was full of quaintness and 
rich in meaning. 

The players entered the room, sing- 
ing Christmas carols; then the herald, 
Caroline Fisher, announced in poetic 
fashion, the purpose of the group ; and 
the following action ensued. Gladys 
Hershey and Marion Kruger appear- 
ing as a quaintly-dressed couple, per- 
formed an old-fashioned waltz which 
brought back reminiscences of other 
days. The scene then shifted to » 
comfortable English home radiating 
Christmas cheer; the family gathers 
around the burning yule-logs, and lis- 
tens to the reading of a legend in 
which the Christmas Angel is men- 
tioned; their curiosity is aroused and 
each one names some gift which will 
be given to the Angel should she ap- 
pear. A knocking is heard at the 
door and a beggar is ushered into 
their midst; all are disappointed, but, 
being filled with the true Christmas 
=;piri, they bestow their gifts upon the 
needy stranger and urge him to re- 
main with them; but he declines, 
+ hanking them kindly and saying that 
he must return to the far country 
from which he came; he departs and 
and then — their gifts gone — the fam- 
ily gaze aft^r their departing guest* 
and lo and behold they find themselves 
gazing no longer upon a beggar, hut 
upon a shining, white-clad figure 
which is none other than the Christmas 
Angel, herself ! The herald again ap- 
pears, thanks the audience for their 
support, and, in the gentle language 
of the poet, reminds them of others 
less fortunate than themselves during 
theis happy Christmas season. 

The following individuals appeared 
in the above presentation: — Caroline 
Fisher, Dorothy Hafer, Mildred Chris- 
tianson, Ruth Shroyer, Gladys Her- 
shey, Marion Kruger, Kathryn Yingst, 
Gretna Drawbaugh, Augusta Trachte 
Anne Gohn, and Minna Wolfskill. 

An additional numbers on the pro- 
gram was a "sing" in which all pres- 
ent participated. The old carols were 
sung with renewed interest and en- 
thusiasm, until individaul gifts were 
distributed; then began a period of 
eating and playing games, and in this 
manner a very delightful evening was 
brought to a close. 



PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



On Friday evening, December 12, 
Philo held its yearly administration 
of the "Second Degree." Eleven fear- 
ful candidates, huddled together in a 
room, were taken one by one in al- 
phabetical order to the closet where 
the Philo goat is kept. Thoroughly 
angered and enraged by a year of 
fasting, the goat tore loose from his 



keepers and savagely mauied its vic- 
tims. Not one escaped its terrifying 
assaults, nor did the last obtain less 
than the first, for to him who follow- 
ed in the rear, Philo's goat seemed 
omnipotent indeed. Not only the goa 
was there, but any of the initiated 
can testify that all the monstrous 
creations of fable gave the pscholo- 
gical atmosphere to the ordeal by their 
crys, howlings, and laying on of 
hands. However through it all, each 
bne with martyr-like fortitude per- 
severed, and notwithstanding heart- 
beats as loud as bass drums, features 
sale as death and bodies bathed in 
cold sweat, there were no serious 
casualties. Then the goat was pushed 
into his stall for another year, and 
new as well as old Philos joined in 
a social hour. 

At a short business meeting, Charles 
Wise was elected anniversary presi- 
dent of the society. 




Three rousing cheers! Basketball 
season is here at last. The squad has 
settled down to hard work in the hig^ 
school gym. Go to it fellows— ^ 
want another wonder team. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



The Kalozetean Literary Society held 
its annual initiation last Friday night. 
The meeting was called for 6:30 when 
all of the pledged members assembled 
in Kalo Hall. After a short business 
meeting consisting of reports of the 
nominating committee and election of 
officers was adjourned, the candi- 
dates were escorted to the alumni 
gymnasium. Here they were given 
the second and third degree. The large 
number desiring admission to the soc- 
iety necessitated a short snapped cer- 
emony. Great spirit was displayed by 
the pledges and members through- 
out the entire session. Those enter- 
ing the societ were: Gerald White, 
Abe Bower, George Derickson, Daniel 
Engle, James Friday, Earl Hoover, 
Robert Hughes, Peter Kandrat, George 
Klitch, Carl Long, W. Mathias, Leroy 
Miller, Rudy Miller, Arnald Piplere, 
Wm. Seiger, George Sherk, Snowhill, 
Todd, Volkin, and Adams. 

A short business meeting was held 
Tuesday noon and the following offi- 
cers were installed: 

George Becker, president; Charles 
salek, vice president; William Mar- 
tin Speg, secretary; Walter Krum- 
chaplain and Todd and Hoover, ser- 
geants-at-arms. These officers were 
installed by the retiring president, 
Russel Morgan. They start their dut- 
ies immediately after the holidays. 



Bids will be received on December 
30th for the construction of the new 
$3,500,000 penitentiary to be built near 
Lewisburg, Pa, This prison will take 
care of the northeastern portion of 
the United States which has been 
without a place for the confinement 
of offenders against the Federal Law. 
It will thus relieve the over-crowded 
conditions at Atlanta and Leaven- 
worth. This is the first of the insti- 
tutions to be built in conformity with 
the new prison program of President 
Hoover. 



Raymond Poincare, 70 year old 
statesman of France, is seriously ill. 
Reports state his illness has develop- 
ed into partial paralysis. 



Spain is under martial law as a re- 
sult of the reecnt revolutionary out- 
breaks. The death sentence has been 
imposed on a number of th e rebels. 
Two of the ringleaders faced the fir- 
ing squad without being blindfolded 
and smoking cigarettes. 

King Alfonso has provided for his 
family outside of Spain in case of a 
crash. Queen Victoria, who is a mem- 
ber of the English royal family has 
insisted that as far as possible some 
British relative or close friend from 
the homeland be with her always in 
Madrid. 



Albright hit snags in th e first tw 
tilts of the season. They lost to Laf- 
ayette and Rutgers. Can it be po s . 
sible that the Reading lads are going 
to be late in starting this year? 



Haines and Karlip, two figures that 
flashed on the gridiron are sharing 
honors on the court for Albright. Thev 
had seven points each in the scuffle 
with Rutgers. 



F and M College suffered a severe 
set back at the hands of Penn but 
three nights later they came back and 
trounced Lehigh — Reports say that 
F and M has a much better team than 
last year. That gives us something 
to work for. We must beat F and M! 



The Gettysburg Bullet hit "bullet- 
proof" defense in the form of Waynes- 
burg College basket tossers. They 
were at the short end of a 44-19 score. 
We stopped the "Bullet" last year— 
ht's repeat! 



Waynesboro College journeyed to, 
the hills of Emmitsburg, Maryland 
and handed the Mt. St. Mary's bas- 
keteers a 28-15 set back. We play 
the Marylanders in Emmitsburg this 
season. It has been proven that they 
can be beaten on their home floor. 
Let's chalk this tilt up in the win col- 
umn too I 



Sprenkle of York, Strum of Ephra- 
ta and Max Light *i Lebanon are 
showing real form on the local court 
during the daily (or rather nightly) 
practices. They may see plenty of 
action if they keep up the good work. 



Ursinus, another of our opponents 
staged a remarkable come back during 
the second half of their tilt with Hav- 
erford and counted a 37 to 20 victory. 
Lodge, a tall lanky forward playing 
his first year for Ursinus scored seven 
(field goals and a foul for a total of 
15 points. That's a boy we must 
watch, guards. Let's hold him down- 
along with the other four players! 



Bucknell journeyed to Wilkes-Barre 
and lost an over time game to the 
flashy St. Thomas quintet 32-36. We 
play the Bison on our home floor this 
year. We haven't played them since 
1928 but we beat them twice that year. 
How about winning the game this 
year too. Stop the Thundering Herd! 
Only five can get on the floor at one 
time! 



We may have trounced Washington 
College on the gridiron but they boast 
a fine basketball team this year. They 
won their initial encounter by a larg e 
score. They have a team of six-foot- 
ers. Don't you wish we played those 
"big boys"? 



Three cheers for Dickinson! They 
journeyed to Philadelphia and hand- 
ed Pen quite a set back. After the 
smoke cleared away the score ^as 
39-31 with Penn on the short end. » 
might make us feel better if we don 
forget that the coach of the Dickinson 
Quintet is a Lebanon Valley graduate- 
It comes natural to him — Check! 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE T O CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

— Jonathan Swift. 



Greene — I've changed my mind. 

Walker — Attaboy! Does the new one work any better V 
LVC • 



Prof. Stokes — What, late again? 

Bill Barnes — Yes sir. You see, ther e are nine of us at the Jersey Ciub, 
and the alarm was only set for eight. : 

LVC 



Miller — The doctor says there's something wrong with my head. 
Gohn — You don't mean to say you paid a doctor to tell you that "/ 

LVC 



The trouble with the femmes, says Salada, is that they're all too biased. 
It's always 'bias this' and 'bias that', until you're broke. 

LVC 



Thug — I'm burning with love for you. 
Evangeline — Oh, don't make a fuel of yourself. 

LVC 



Salek — If you found ten bucks in your pocket, what would you think' 
Kuhnert — I'd think I had somebody else's pants on. 

LVC 



Hester — What is mostly raised in damp climates? 
Flooky — Umbrellas. 

LVC 



Clem — Do you believe everything every fool tells you? 
Ruth — No, but sometimes you do sound so plausible. 

LVC 



v^op — Why don't you blow your horn? 
Wogan — Who do you think I am, Little Boy Blue? 

LVC 



Mary Elizabeth — If I get you a tie for Christmas, will you wear it? 
Earl — Nothing else but. 

LVC 



Warden — You hav e a complaint to make? What is it? 
Convict — Ther e ain't enough exits sir. 

LVC 



"I'm only five feet two, 
And fragile as a dream; 
I'm but a girl, and yet 
I've made the football team!" 

LVC 



his 



. p aul— Why on earth is Johnny standing in front of the mirror with 
la e yes shut? 

Fred — He wants to see how he looks when he's asleep. 

LVC 



B ELl£VE IT OR NOT- 

l ay » There was once a chalk artist wn '° didn>t murde r " The Road to Manda 



• t Y °u can't drive a nail with a sponge, no matter how hard you soak 



Th 



e girl who is chaste is seldom pursued. 



Ti 



me will tell but co-eds won't. 
of f alli ng in love with a girl at first sight is, after all, just a matter 
x °rm. 



^self Ve is the feelin £ that makes a c °- ed make a ™ an make a f ° o1 of 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



The House of Representatives un- 
animously passed a bill providing for 
a 44 hour work week for all postal 
employees. This bill was passed over 
the opposition of Postmaster Brown, 
if ratified by the Senate and signed 
by the President all employees in the 
postal service will get a Saturday half 
holiday. It will also give additional 
work to 10,000 postal substitutes 
throughout the country. Cost to the 
Government would be upward of $2,- 
000,000 a year. 



Dr. Doran, Alcoholic Commissioner 
has announced the development oi ? 
new poisonous denaturant which mak- 
es alcoholic taste "like a combinatior 
of rotten eggs and garlic." He will 
substitute for the wood alcohol which 
the Government has been using in its 
denaturing formulas to discourage the 
diversion of alcohol into bootleggin- 
channels fcr beverage purposes. 



Ruth Nichols says its a satisfaction 
to cross the continent faster thar 
Colonel Lindbergh and a pleasure tr 
set a new record in time for a trans- 
continental flight by a woman. 



Life histories of some of the coun- 
try's most notorious gangsters are 
being studied by the Government to 
see if they can be deported. The list 
includes rackateers in New York, Chi- 
cago, and other large cities. 



William O. Baker, president of the 
Philadelphia National League base- 
ball died last week in Montreal, Cana- 
da, from a heart attack during the 
night. He was 64 years old. 



Ty Cobb, former American League 
batting king, declares if the price 
were right he would become interest- 
ed in the purchase of the National 
League Franchise, if Mr. Baker's heirs 
decide to sell it. 



King Carol asked Parliament to re- 
duce the government appropriations 
for upkeep of the royal family by 
22 percent. In the 1931 budget the 
government employees get a 20 per- 
cent reduction in salaries. 



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SN'T IT 
TIME 



Y O U 



TELEPHONED 

fJMother and HDad 




BRIGHTEN 

this evening and 

several tomorrows! 

The cheering effects of a telephone chat 
with the home folks are much more last- 
ing than most of the Campus Pleasures. 
For several tomorrows, you will feel the 
thrill of those voices in your ear, and they 
will feel the thrill of yours. 
We are moved to use those time-tried 
words, "a trial will convince you." 
Make a date to telephone home on a 
certain evening every week. 
Just give the Operator your home tele- 
phone number and stay on the line. 
{Charges may be reversed.) 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1930 



CAMPUS ENJOYS 

CHRISTMAS PLAY 



(Continued from Page 1) 



fles had told him before. The dream 
is so realistic that the lad pleads with 
the Christ for his father's happiness. 
Through it he is made whole and thus 
restores his father to happiness. 

Marie Gelwicks portrayed the part 
of the young crippled boy admirably. 
Wiliam Barnes as his father presented 
his characterization well. Russell 
Morgan, as the drunken companion of 
Sir Humphre ably played his role 
In Paul Keene was the typical Englisr 
servant. Mary E. Stephens as th' 
wife and Russell Williams as the hus 
band played their parts well as tb 
daughter and son-in-law, respective! 
of Pruffles, the servant. 

In Humphrey's dream were th' 
Three Wise Men, Paul Keene as Gar 
pard, William Barnes as Balthasar an' 
Russell Morgan as Melchoir. Russel' 
Williams represented Joseph, the fath- 
er of the Savior and Mary E Stephens 
as Mary the Mothe r of Jesus. Chester 
Goodman read the words of the anere 1 

The carolers who san<r for the little 
crinpled boy were Dorothy Hafer, Dor- 
othy Garber. Caroline Fisher, Hester 
,Thompson, George Brubaker, Chester 
Goodman, Robert Rcudabush and Ken- 
neth Russell. 

The plav was well acted and showed 
a pretty and charming picture of wh? 
Christmas should mean to us. 

The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A 
v are deeply indebted to Prof. Bm-' 
Behney f^r his efforts in the coachhv 
■•of this Christmas play. 



CELLO ARTIP^ riVES 

RECITAL IN CHAPET 

I 



Members of the focu'ty ™d studen' 
bodv were afforded °n ivn-nf* 1 trea + 
during the regular chapel period on 
Wednesdav mornms-. in the form of 
a delightful concert given on the 
cello by Mr. John Mver, of Reading 
Pennsylvania, who b"<? proved himseF 
a very valuable acPiMon to the Con- 
servatory Faculty tlrs v«>ar, bein°- in 
structor in cello, a<= well as the very 
capable leader of the college orches- 
tra. 

Words cannot ad°nuatelv expres*- 
the pleasurable aoo^eciation wit 1 ' 
which this musical program was re- 
ceived. The audience gave its un- 
divided attention whole-heartedly as 
Mr. Myer, possessing a pure, rich 
tone, facile technique and marked in- 
terpretative ffifts, lrmself a soloist 
high order in a well-nlanned program 
which included first the "Largo" from 
a G Major Concerto bv Gotterman 
played with impeccable tone and great 
depth of feeling. After much ap- 
plause this was followed by the more 
lively "Scherzo" of Daniel von Goens 
revealing crisp, clean-cut playing c f 
a number which contains technics 1 
difficulties unsuspected by the lay- 
man. Still more applause came from 
the audience at the close of this num- 
ber, after which Mr. Myer concluded 
his brief but thrilling program witr 
the famiiar and ever-popular "Ber- 
ceuse" from Gacelyn, by Godard, which 
was played with great artistry and in 
a true romantic style. 

Mrs. Bender supplied effective ac- 
companiment giving Mr. Myer dis- 
tinguished support at the piano. 

The audience was unstrained in its 
enthusiasm and demonstrated that it 
will welcome any opportunity which 
the future may present for having the 
honor to again listen to Mr. Myer's 
playing. 



MEN PREPARE FOR 

CAGE SEASON 



(Continued from Page 1) 



FITZGERALD DISCUSSES 
LIFE OF RAIL MAGNATE 



Reeder. They will all be fighting hard 
for positions. 

The manager, Dean Salada, has 
booked fifteen games to date with the 
possibility that one or two more may 
be added. The schedule as it now 
stands appears to be the toughest fac- 
3d in years especially in view of the 
fact that ten of the games are played 
jn foreign courts ai d only five are 
played in the local gym. 

The home games will be against 
such quintettes as Susquehanna, Buck- 
nell, F. & M., Gettysburg and Albright. 
Lafayette is the first opponent on 
January 10 and the first home game 
Joes not come until February 14. The 
schedule follows, 

sat., Jan. 10 — Lafayette Away 
Wed., Jan. 14 — Ursinus Away 
Fri., Jan. 23 — Susquehanna Away 
iat., Jan. 24 — Temple Away 
3at., Jan. 31— Mt. St. Mary's Away 
Fri., Feb. 13— F & M Away 
-3at., Feb. 14 — Susquehanna Home 
fue., Feb. 17 — Bucknell Home 
Thur., Feb. 19 — Albright Away 
Sat., Feb. 21— Muhlenberg Away 
Mon., Feb. 23— P. M. C. Away 
Wed., Feb. 25— F & M Home 
3at., Feb. 28— Gettysburg Home 
Wed., March 4 — Bucknell Away 
Sat.. March 7— Albright Home 



n 



A -l SKIL* 
WORKS WONDERS 




BEFORE ^ Wi AFTER 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 



207 W. Main 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESSING 
KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



(Continued from Page 1) 



vious occasions, but seemed to be at 
his best last week. He will return 
next month to speak at a lucheon 
of the Commerce Club. If more 
speakers of his type were used during 
the chapel periods — men of capacity 
who have a real message to deliver, 
one which grows out of each man's 
particular field — attendance would 
rapidly lose the perfunctory character 
By the various scores we see what 
type of opposition we must face this 
year. It is no snap — meaning our 
schedule. We have fine material for 
a good fast team. -We want to win 
plenty of games this season so let's 
buckle down and get to work. The 
team is going to do the worK on the 
court if we do the cheering. Let's co- 
operate and have a great season. Those 
opposed will find the railroad ticket 
office just two blocks away — pleasant 
journey! 



Sandwiches 



Sodas 



EAT AT ROEMIG'S 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE 

ICE CREAM 
Cigars Cigarettes 



H. GOODMAN & SONS 

29 W. Sheridan Ave. 

Real Refreshments in a 
Real Way 
Ice Cream, Cakes and Pies 



Grimm s Book Store 

Try us for your needs 

GIFT SUGGESTIONS FOR 
CHRISTMAS 

RINGS 

SOCIETY PINS set with 
Pearls 

SHAEFFER FOUNTAIN 

PENS AND PENCILS 
DESK SETS 
BOOK ENDS 

DIE STAMPED STATION- 
ERY with College or Soc- 
iety Seals 



LET'S GO— 

Buy your Note Books, Fillers, Fountain Pens, and other 
School Supplies at 

ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

38 N. 8th St. -:- -:- Lebanon, Pa. 

J. W. Esbenshade, 03. Edith S. Esbenshade, '03. 

Ann Augusta Esbenshade, '32. 



JUST RECEIVED A FRESH SUPPLY OF 
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761 Cumberlad Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



ANNUAL BANQUET 

ENJOYED BY ALL 



(Continued from Page 1) 



Robert McFaul representative of the 
Freshmen class broke into the L. V. C. 
speakers in a very creditable manner. 

After the speakers had finished 
Miss Sara Ensminger on behalf of 
the Y's presented Mrs. Green with a 
little present which showed their ap- 
preciation for all she has done for 
them. 

In the small dining hall, Miss Dor- 
othy Thompson bad charge of the 
toasts and handled them very well 
indeed. Mr. Robert Roudabush spoke 
on behalf of the Senior class. Miss 
Lollita Mummert, using the jokes 
which one may tell brought peal after 
peal of laughter from her audience. 
Mr. Edward Shellenberger of the Sop- 
homore class did very well in express- 
the sentiments of his class in several 
good jokes. Miss Viola Williams of 
the class of '34 spoke from beyond 
the conventional and brought out 
some good philosophy. 

The whole program was arranged on 



the "Amos and Andy" style, 
s'peaker did or said something whi^ 
referred directly to that couple j 
popular humorists. The title of ^ 
speeches in both dining halls were 
there order, "Hallo," "Sho-Sh 
"Check" and "Double Check." 



» Hi 



Five of the eight engineers 
have been on trial in Moscow for sev 
eral weeks on charges of conspiri^ 
against the Soviet Government had 
their death sentence verdict change 
to ten years imprisonment. The other 
three had their ten year imprisonment 
sentence reduced to eight years, ^jj 
are deprived of citizenship rights f 0r 
five years. Their property is to be 
confiscated. Had the engineers been 
executed the Pioneers planned simul- 
taneously to hang in effigy Aristide 
Briande and Raymond Poincare, f 
France, and Sir Henry Setering and 
Winston Churchill, of England. These 
men were named in the confession of 
the engineers as having conspired for 
intervention in Russia. 



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When you want work 
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